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  2. Mr.t

    111D1E6E-5346-4D9E-94C6-1D738881A05F.jpeg

    Those look really good!!! Are those like blade baits or lipless baits?
  3. Today
  4. Looks water related. I got hard water spots like this on jigs once because, for some reason I can't remember, I needed to wash them off before baking.
  5. smalljaw

    Whip Finish

    I use the tool, I can do them by hand but not as fast as I can with the tool.
  6. cadman

    Getting into jigs

    Pouring is the easy part. I find polishing lead-free jigs cumbersome. Powder painting lead-free jigs is a challenge. Once that is all done. Skirting is easy. Just make sure to wire tie your skirts. If you sell them it is a selling point. Using rubber collars are fine for yourself, however the rubber dries out or loosens and the skirt falls apart. That doesn't happen with hand tying whether wire or thread.
  7. ChrisNick78

    Getting into jigs

    Will do. I'll be a newbie to pouring jigs though. I make soft plastics as of now. But I want jigs for myself and maybe try to sell some not sure on the selling part yet. My wife wants to make the skirts she wants to help out
  8. cadman

    Getting into jigs

    If you are going to buy the fishing bismuth mix, please post how it works out for you. I was thinking of switching over but have not done that so far.
  9. Colton Holler

    CMH LURES White Sucker Wake Bait

    See more @cmh_lures on Instagram
  10. ChrisNick78

    Getting into jigs

    I have I see the have ingots for lead free fishing jigs that's bismuth/tin mix. Thank you
  11. gaspumper

    Getting into jigs

    Google roto metals for prices. Also lead melts at 621 deg and bismuth at 520 deg.
  12. ChrisNick78

    Getting into jigs

    No offense taken at all. Thank you for the info greatly appreciated
  13. cadman

    Getting into jigs

    Are you looking to sell these or are you looking to buy? There are a lot of variables here. Painted, unpainted , what kind of hook, skirted complete with weedguard ready to fish.
  14. cadman

    Getting into jigs

    That is going to very, depending on how much tin, and other properties are in the bismuth you buy. I mix my own, however since I sell my jigs, I don't want to share my percentages. Don't take offense to this, as I am always willing to help. As far as temp and baking goes, all I can say is start low with (200 degrees) heat and go up from there. You will have to do some testing on your own to see what is the correct temp and the length of time the jig needs to be in the oven. I can't give you this info, because every oven is different and if I give you a number and you melt all of your jigs well, you know where I'm going with this. Good Luck.
  15. ChrisNick78

    Getting into jigs

    What temp and how long do you bake for
  16. Mr.BankYanker

    Automotive Clear Coat

    So do you find auto clear to be durable for lures? 2 part auto clear ?
  17. Mr.BankYanker

    Spraying Automotive Clear?

    So are you still using auto clear ... that's all I've ever used as I paint cars daily and recently started painting lures .... how do you feel about the auto clear for lures?
  18. Jig Man

    Whip Finish

    When I was tying a lot of bucktails I got to the point that I could tie two dozen an hour start to finish. I had one guy who placed a 90 dozen order every year and I had a deadline when he ordered. I do at least 10 whips per head and several more at the end of the chenille before gluing.
  19. Apdriver

    2 ton epoxy question

    When I first started making and painting jigs, I struggled with this decision. Topcoat or not? Eyes or not? I knew my jigs caught fish without the topcoat and eyes so why bother? After awhile and looking at some of the beautiful baits and creations in our gallery, I wanted my stuff to look like that. I needed to “up” my game. I asked a lot of questions and read a lot about people were doing, what products they were using etc.etc. Smalljaw told me one day what the topcoat will Do is make all that color you spent so much time applying really POP. That was sage advise from an experienced baitmaker. Eyes enhance your creations, also.
  20. Tarheelfishing88

    Any "REAL" custom crank bait makers left?

    I will say that the FB sites I've used have helped me improve the finish on my wood baits for airbrushing, clear coating, and foiling dramatically, but they haven't helped as much with actual crankbait building and design. Personally, I try not to ask questions unless I have first researched something and attempted to figure out my own solution. If someone gives you an answer to something it is much less likely that you'll even try to come up with a way to do it yourself and no creative thought is put towards that process. If we aren't thinking outside of the box then innovation occurs much more slowly. I'm willing to put in the time and work, and in many instances that has helped me. The other side of this is there have also been times when I've been stuck on various things that caused me to waste a ton of time figuring something out when there was a simple solution that many builders before me have taken advantage of. It's taken me this long to finally get confident that I can produce the few wood models that I make consistently to achieve desired action, and also understand the adjustments that I can make to them to fulfill multiple niches with each body style. This is for 1 piece balsa and basswood builds that are not inherently complex. I've got several more complex ideas that I had difficulty working with when I first started building, because I quickly realized that I didn't fully understand all of the variables and forces at play. Most of these ideas are going to require me to use 2 piece builds. The biggest problem I'm having at this point is finding ways to speed up the production of my baits so that I can make more efficient use of my time. Right now I use a band saw for basic shape, disk/belt sander for refining edges, and then carve and hand sand to reach my desired blank shape. That works well, but the hand carving/sanding is incredibly inefficient. In a perfect world new builders would be paired with an experienced one, and there would be a knowledge share that would take place. It's obvious what the experienced builder provides, but less so with a new builder. A new builder's lack of experience can actually be an advantage when it comes to creativity and ability to provide a fresh perspective. A new builder doesn't have preconceived notions about how things should work or be done. This can help provide new inspiration for crankbait design or production techniques that could be used by both builders. Think of it similar to how many large companies are moving towards a combination of young and more experienced employees within their executive teams. Since we don't often have this scenario for crankbait builders this site is about as close as many of us can get to this type of knowledge share.
  21. Jimmyjigs

    Getting into jigs

    Cadman,Can you ballpark the price for a bismuth/tin simple jig?
  22. Jimmyjigs

    Whip Finish

    Jigman,Cadman,Had a fellow tier who tied the whip finish by hand so fast it was impossible for me to ever learn it.Almost hard to see it! Unfortunately I finish heads with 2 modified half hitches that go around 4 times instead of just one. Never had any come apart but, if I don't really cinch them up a whisp of thread can stick out which has to be clipped.Might buy the tool.Thanx.
  23. Skeeter

    Perfect D2T Finish??

    Your problem is not dirt. What you are feeling is bubbles that have come to the surfaced and popped. Your problem is that your environment is too dry. You should have a humidity of at least 62%. Temp should be around 70 to 76 deg. Skeeter
  24. cadman

    2 ton epoxy question

    Cope102, there are many ways to do things. Jimmyjigs has some valid points. You can put jigs on a fixture that they use to turn fishing rod epoxy, this will keep the epoxy from sagging and running. You don't have to use epoxy for putting in weedguards or covering eyes. There are a lot of options. Find what works for you and if you're happy with it go for it. Only you know how much time and money you want to put into making your jigs. The fish don't care if your jigs are perfect, however if you are selling jigs, your customers will always want top notch work. As far as brushing epoxy on jigs, I never get brush streaks. The epoxy is self leveling and the brush streaks disappear.
  25. cadman

    Getting into jigs

    I pour and sell bismuth/tin mix jigs. They are a P.I.T.A to do because the bismuth is very hard and some jig profiles are difficult to get out of the mold. Bismuth/tin jigs are expensive because of the cost of the bismuth. Yes you can powder paint them. You have to use lower heat temps other wise you will melt the jigs. Bismuth has a very low melting point. If you fish a lot of jigs like me, you will have to use a larger bismuth head to compensate for the weight difference. However the fish really don't care. As for the wax you are referring to, if this means fluxing the bismuth, I do not flux bismuth. Welcome to TU and Good Luck.
  26. cadman

    Whip Finish

    I do the whip finish by hand and with a tool. I've yet to decide which is faster. But both methods work very well.
  27. Jig Man

    Getting into jigs

    Fortunately for me we can use lead so I haven't used that mixture. However, my opinion is that most anything that can be heated can be powder coated. I'm sure guys like Cadman and Smalljaw have experience and will be along to give you some good advice.
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