Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Jig Production- Baking Powder Paint Jigs


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 thill

thill

    Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPip
  • 44 posts

Posted 03 February 2008 - 07:15 AM

I commonly do batches of jigs in the hundreds.

I read where most guys seem to like toaster ovens for baking their jigs for powder painting, and I have some questions....

How fast does the oven reach 350* after you fill it with jigs?

How many jigs can you fit in the oven at one time?

Why do so many people say not to use a regular oven?

Just curious if this would be better than using our cooking oven. I can fit about 300 jigs in it at a time, and so far, I haven't had any drips, and can't see any downside. It doesn't even smell.

Looking for different opinions, so please speak freely. Thanks.

-TH

#2 dayooper

dayooper

    Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPip
  • 156 posts

Posted 03 February 2008 - 08:49 AM

Thill,

If using a toaster oven you want to make sure to use an oven thermometer. The guages on them can be way off. Mine for example, I will set to 400 and the oven thermometer only says 350. It will take just a little bit to get ot 350 when fully loaded with jigs.

I believe alot of people say not to use your cooking oven for curing jigs for the simple fact of the lead. You are putting lead in your oven and heating it. Al beit it is encased in powder paint and the temperatures do not get hot enough for the lead to be dangerous. I would hate for somebody to cure the jigs in the kitchen oven and then one of their kids get sick. So I believe alot of it has to do with precaution. Another major fact is your wife, if she is like mine :). My wife has a fit when I am melting lead in the back yard in the open air saying she can smell it and it stinks. She also got mad when I cured some ice jigging spoons that contain no lead in our kitchen oven. For these reasons, I simply use a toaster oven. Saves on the headaches with the wife.:worship:

Thanks!
Benjamin

#3 BLT

BLT

    Advanced Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 363 posts
  • Location:
    Lancaster, Pa.

Posted 03 February 2008 - 09:55 AM

Agree on not using the Wifes oven. OK, not PC, the kitchen oven lol.
I have my toaster oven in the garage upside down. I have the rack pulled out while the oven is heating up, and have it resting on a pan on each side so the rack is about 4" above the workbench. I hang the jigs from the rails of the rack, toaster oven gets warmed up, open lid, put rack in the oven. Be careful to check that none of the jigs slide against each other when you put the rack into the oven. Only tricky thing about this method is when the oven is sitting on it's top, the door will open up, not down, so you will have to hold it up, and put the rack in with one hand, or use something to prop it up. I've done either method, just depends on jig size/how heavy the rack is.
I prefer to do it this way instead of just loading up the rack while in the oven, and then turning it on.

#4 LedHed

LedHed

    Advanced Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 799 posts

Posted 03 February 2008 - 10:53 AM

thill
”How fast does the oven reach 350* after you fill it with jigs?”
How big are the jigs, what kind of temp control, and type oven???
”How many jigs can you fit in the oven at one time?”
How big are the jigs and type oven???
”Why do so many people say not to use a regular oven?”
Do not bring lead into your kitchen – especially if you have children. Refer to the Do-It web site or their pamphlet and read safety.

During the curing process, all PP release (off) gas and the residual gas collects in the curing chamber. The problem is when you reheat the oven at a higher temp (i.e. for cooking) the residue is re-released into the oven. I think Columbia Coatings might have the info posted on their web site – it is in the safety section of their manual.

There was a previous post describing the use of a deep cake pan with threaded rods to hang jigs on – pretty sure there were pics included. It’s something you might want to try. If you have two – you can be loading one while one is curing.

Used ovens are cheap – even new ones. Get the best one you can afford – it’s a business investment. They make some good size ones that can handle the volume you are talking about.

Be safe

#5 smalljaw

smalljaw

    Advanced Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,400 posts
  • Location:
    Pennsylvania

Posted 03 February 2008 - 12:24 PM

I use the house oven to mine but I only do them once a month before the oven gets cleaned. I have made a simple but efficient way to do alot of jigs at one time and it's cheap. Buy one of those soft aluminum lasagna pans and take a wire coat hanger and cut the straight piece that goes across the bottom off. Make a small hole at each end of the pan and put the hanger wire through so it's now attached at both ends of the pan. Now you have a rack to hang about 20 -25 jigs depending on the size and if you have dripping issues not to worry, it'll just drip into the pan. One more thing with the pan method, you'll need the oven at about 7 degrees hotter than what you want to cure at, I checked the heat inside the pan the first couple of times and it was 7 degrees cooler than the surrounding temp.

Posted Image

#6 HookUp

HookUp

    Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPip
  • 177 posts

Posted 05 February 2008 - 09:58 AM

I replaced my used toaster oven with a new one and retired the old one for jig cooking.

Built a few quick jig holders by using old scrap metal from a garage door opener for the base, and onto that Plaster of Paris riviting scraping tape bent in a square to hold the jigs. I can do up to 46 at a time, or build another base/scraping tape and do over 60. Suits my small time needs just fime.

I trust the temp setting on the over, and never had a problem w/ the powder paint, or the rare time I've done plastic weed brush guards. Mostly do single strand wire weedguards or no weedguard at all, so rarely change the setting from 350dF.

I like BLT's tip of an upside down toaster trick, may have to try that out.

#7 bgcountry00

bgcountry00

    Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPip
  • 96 posts
  • Location:
    Minnesota

Posted 06 February 2008 - 12:06 AM

I took the tray that comes with my toaster oven an wrap copper craft wire around it and it keeps the jigs from sliding I can do bout 150-200 jigs at a timee

#8 Old man in the boat

Old man in the boat

    Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPip
  • 96 posts

Posted 06 February 2008 - 12:18 AM

when we bought the new oven I got the old one......Mamma doesn't say a thing

#9 bgcountry00

bgcountry00

    Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPip
  • 96 posts
  • Location:
    Minnesota

Posted 06 February 2008 - 03:21 PM

I wish I could get a full size oven in my tying room just not enough space. i think that I will be buying 2 more toaster ovens today thou

#10 SMALLIEHUNTER

SMALLIEHUNTER

    Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPip
  • 128 posts

Posted 06 February 2008 - 07:15 PM

I got rid of my toaster oven and bought one of these http://cgi.#########...hZ014QQcategory

#11 thill

thill

    Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPip
  • 44 posts

Posted 06 February 2008 - 07:22 PM

Thanks for the replies, guys!

I'm commonly making 1-4 oz. jigs, on 8/0 hooks (saltwater fishing) and I have not seen a toaster oven that can handle the volume I need.

I have done a little research, and it appears that the reason my jigs don't drip is due to me putting them in a cold, NON TOASTER oven and THEN turning it on. As the AIR warms, the paint partially cures before reaching the liquifying temperature. By the time it hits that temp, the paint is already set. In the toaster oven, the hot coils radiate heat directly to the jig, and the paint liquifies and drips.

I just thought I'd pass this information on.

-TH

#12 bgcountry00

bgcountry00

    Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPip
  • 96 posts
  • Location:
    Minnesota

Posted 06 February 2008 - 11:12 PM

your link didn't come thru. I am always looking for new ways to do things. looking to get a bigger fluid bed. doing them 1 at a time takes forever when you have 400 a week

#13 flippinfool

flippinfool

    Member

  • TU Member
  • PipPip
  • 110 posts
  • Location:
    US

Posted 08 February 2008 - 09:27 PM

Here is a pic of my home made powder coating baking pan. I doubled up some square cheap roasting pans and use banding iron as hanging racks.
Banding iron is a product used in plumbing to hang pipes. It's cheap and available almost anywhere. What I like about it, is it keeps the jigs from sliding together. Just drop a hook in a hole.

Just crimp the banding iron to the sides of the pan with a plier.






.tnail { height: 240px; width: 320px; position: relative; } .tnail img { height:240px; width: 640px; position: absolute; } http://by133w.bay133...CA391CB18818D0|