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Soft Plastic Rod/reel Combo


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#1 pondfisherman

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Posted 30 January 2011 - 09:01 PM

what is a good rod and reel combo for t-rigs and jigs should it be spinning or baitcasting

#2 BobP

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Posted 13 March 2011 - 02:11 PM

I think the most important part is the rod. Whatever length you like but it needs to be the most sensitive rod in your arsenal, light, and with a fast tip section. For me, that has been a custom built Rogue MB-664 for T-rigs and a Rogue MB-705 for C-rigs. You can spend $350 for a Loomis GLX or St Croix SCV rod in the same general quality, and any of them will be well worth the expense. I pair the rod with a very light reel to make a combo that is as neutrally balanced as possible when you hold it. My choice is usually a Shimano Chronarch 50MG at less than 6 oz for T-rigs. Now, the cherry on top - always fish it with fluorocarbon line.

You can skimp if you have to on rods for moving bait presentations like SB's, cranks, topwaters, etc. Never skimp on rods used for touchy-feely presentations like T-rigged plastics or C-rigs. That's where sensitivity and low weight really count, and where high end (high cost) graphite makes a real difference.

Spinning or baitcasting? I like baitcasters because I can throw them more accurately and I don't have to worry about line twist. But either will do the job. If you're using very light line (4-8 lb test) for finesse plastics like shaky head worms, dropshots or unweighted plastics, spinning combos dominate 'cause baitcasters won't throw very light baits reliably.

Edited by BobP, 13 March 2011 - 02:15 PM.


#3 Braided Line

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 07:03 AM

Spinning or bait caster? Spinning is much easier to use that`s why a lot of people use them .IMO.
Somebody who knows how to use a bait-caster will/can blow the socks off a spinning reel user in so far as accuracy and speed of casts goes.
As accuracy is the main goal in delivering your lure to a given spot it`s a no-brainer, a bait casting reel in the hands of a proficient
user can be on target cast after cast. Just my opinion .

I`m not bashing spinners or folks that use them. Or put another way, different strokes for different folks. :)

#4 Braided Line

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Posted 25 April 2011 - 08:03 AM

I think the most important part is the rod. Whatever length you like but it needs to be the most sensitive rod in your arsenal, light, and with a fast tip section. For me, that has been a custom built Rogue MB-664 for T-rigs and a Rogue MB-705 for C-rigs. You can spend $350 for a Loomis GLX or St Croix SCV rod in the same general quality, and any of them will be well worth the expense. I pair the rod with a very light reel to make a combo that is as neutrally balanced as possible when you hold it. My choice is usually a Shimano Chronarch 50MG at less than 6 oz for T-rigs. Now, the cherry on top - always fish it with fluorocarbon line.

You can skimp if you have to on rods for moving bait presentations like SB's, cranks, topwaters, etc. Never skimp on rods used for touchy-feely presentations like T-rigged plastics or C-rigs. That's where sensitivity and low weight really count, and where high end (high cost) graphite makes a real difference.

Spinning or baitcasting? I like baitcasters because I can throw them more accurately and I don't have to worry about line twist. But either will do the job. If you're using very light line (4-8 lb test) for finesse plastics like shaky head worms, dropshots or unweighted plastics, spinning combos dominate 'cause baitcasters won't throw very light baits reliably.


BobP:

This is in ref to your last sentence. I`m one baitcaster who fishes the "Zoom floating worm" , just a lite wire hook, no weight about 50% of the time I`m on the water. Give or take. Living in Fl were "fishing plastics in the grass is a way of life"
You either get with the program or ........................

As far as throwing "very light baits reliably" I`ve been at this for a long time and my proficiency/ accuracy distance, is spot on.
Granted you need good equipement and lots of experience to accomplish the "art" in anything. After a lot of years ,I`ve
gotten there.

Just re-read you comment. I thinking one thing and your talking about the .........."REEL." I think! :)
A few years ago I would have agreed but not anymore. Today`s bait casting reels have many more bearings whick
certainly improves there ability to assist in casting very lite baits.
I just bought a Bass Pro Shop, Tournament bait casring reel. Model, PQT10HB. Use it only for my "floaters."
That puppy (reel) is something else. Once adjusted, it seems to have no limits. See your target. Let it fly, Bingo, on
target. It replaced a LEW`S reel which up till that time was doing just fine.

I`ve got some very old Ambasseduer 5000 reels and they are truly great reels
but by todays standards , they are
dinosaurs. Looking at the 5000 and looking at todays moderate priced reels, $75-100...........what an up-grade for
for folks that use baitcasters.
All that being said. any good quality B/C is more than capable of throwiing a ..."light bait reliably."

Hope you look at this as a ............Point..... Counter point. :D

Just for the record. I`ve got 31 baitcasters and only 4 spinners.

#5 BobP

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 10:11 PM

Yeah, I'm not real particular about reels as long as they get the job done without backlashing and the gear ratio suits the application. Rather than brands/models, I was thinking about balancing out your rod/reel combo because worm fishing is a 'touch' presentation and you spend a lot of time balancing the rod at 10 o'clock, trying to sense bites. One of my favorites for plastic or crankbaits is a 1970's era Abu Pro Max 1600 or 3600. I have several I got on Ebay for $50-60 and "rehabbed". They are some of the slickest, far casting, non-backlashing and reliable finesse baitcasters I've ever used - certainly on a par with the performance of my higher end Shimanos. 6 internal bearings and a light aluminum spool. They were top of the line back in the day, sold for $169, and are still great little machines if you don't mind using a round reel.

Baitcaster vs spinning reels: Looked at your location and it seems you're a Southern boy too :lol: 20+ baitcasters and 2 spinning reels for me!

Edited by BobP, 05 May 2011 - 10:14 PM.


#6 blazt*

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 12:29 PM

NEVER buy a rod or reel made from soft plastic!

#7 ROWINGADUBAY

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 01:47 AM

This is a loaded question with a lot of variables with really no right answer for me I would pick a med-med/lite fast action 7' or longer probably in spinning for lighter line and lighter baits my cut off is around 3/8 of an oz for the total wieght of the lure/rig and ten pound test line . For anything over 3/8oz and 10 lb test I would go baitcasting again in a 7 foot or longer
so far as brand goes I am a big fan of shimano reels paired up with a St.Croix rod

#8 DropShot'r

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 03:25 PM

I think it may be easier to point you in a proper direction if we knew:

1) What size & weight of baits do you want to throw.

2) How deep will you be fishing.

3) Will you be fishing in cover and if so how thick.

I have an older 6' 2" M/H Shimano Crucial I fish T-rig Senkos and light (1/4 & 3/8oz) jigs. When I say jig I mean Revenge Flip Jig.

I have a Dobyns SS705C I use as my heavy (1/2, 3/4 & 1oz) jig rod

Drop