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Using Spray Lacquer


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#1 sallystrothers

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Posted 22 February 2011 - 08:33 PM

Has anyone tried using spray lacquer on tiny (size 20-30) nymphs? I am thinking of taking some midge like nymphs and adding 3-4 coats of spray to see if I can get 2 things: the reduction of smell of synthetic material, and the more appropriate reflection of light that a midge would make.

#2 QFBT

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 10:00 AM

Has anyone tried using spray lacquer on tiny (size 20-30) nymphs? I am thinking of taking some midge like nymphs and adding 3-4 coats of spray to see if I can get 2 things: the reduction of smell of synthetic material, and the more appropriate reflection of light that a midge would make.


Hi Sally,
I've never tried using spray lacquer on small chironomid pupas like you mentioned, but I would be curious to hear the results of any success or failures you've had mimicking the "appropriate reflection of light" caused by the collection of gas around the pupa prior to ascension and emergence? When fly fishing lakes this is usually a critical aspect to chironomid pupa fly design.
Thanks.

-Ken

#3 bassrecord

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 01:32 AM

Has anyone tried using spray lacquer on tiny (size 20-30) nymphs? I am thinking of taking some midge like nymphs and adding 3-4 coats of spray to see if I can get 2 things: the reduction of smell of synthetic material, and the more appropriate reflection of light that a midge would make.


Whether you use rattle can lacquer spray or air brush lacquer spray, you will test if the lacquer and the synthetic materials you use have an adverse reaction. Good luck!

Over the years I've used several brands of glass jars with screw on lids to hold any of my lacquer paints with no issue at all. Last week I opened a jar that about 24 hours earlier I had filled with a new lacquer while testing and the "rubber" ring on the jar lid had completely disintegrated! I hope I don't have any lacquer issues with any of my synthetic materials.

You must have some lacquer based paint to "more appropriate reflection of light that a midge would make" in mind. Most lacquer paints come in small 1/2 oz. to 4 oz containers - all of which would easily accommodate fly hooks sized 20 to 30. Have you considered clamping the hook bend in a hemostat and dipping the entire midge into the lacquer and then shaking or blowing out excess paint by mouth, vacuum cleaner or air? As I think about it, if you take along a can of compressed air and bottles of lacquer paint, you could dip midges into your paints, dry it and fish test it on the spot.

I envy you. I could never do this. Shoot, I can't even see to tie a 20 to 30 sized fly hook on any leader.

Good Luck!
John

#4 Geoff

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 09:42 PM

Tying 20 to 30s are easy just clean off lg debris from tying table.Put hook in hemos coat shank w/super glue rub it in the dusty junk left on table and your done.Ha Ha



#5 bassrecord

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 03:05 AM

Bet you could do that really good, Geoff but since I posted that comment nowadays I can't even see them small hooks, much less tie them on to any size tippett!

 

John