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Awesome Stencil Idea From Hobby Lobby


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#1 creekrock00

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 11:02 AM

picked these up yesterday at hobby lobby...they are called eraser shields...they are thin and flexible and have the cutouts alot of us use when painting...they are made by pacific arc and the numbers are er26 and er12....only 1.99 each and about 2x4 inches in size...just thought i would pass this along...Attached File  photo (1).JPG   109.14K   592 downloads

#2 Bester

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 12:49 PM

Very cool. Thanks for posting

#3 mark poulson

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 09:50 AM

Good idea!

#4 Firechief

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 09:59 AM

Great idea

#5 Sonny.Barile

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 09:56 PM

Anyone who had a drafting class (before computers) has one of these. LOL I have one that is 28 years old.

#6 garyo1954

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 10:21 PM

Anyone who had a drafting class (before computers) has one of these. LOL I have one that is 28 years old.


Heh! Still have a few from electronic technician school with resistors, capacitors, chokes and stuff on them. Great idea!

#7 Hooklineandsinker

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 09:40 AM

I have one from High School drafting class. I do have another question concerning scaling: I have tried all kinds of products to get a desirable scale pattern. Tulle, soap puffs, hair net, etc. What have you found to give the best scale pattern?

#8 BobP

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 11:10 AM

I've been painting for 10+ years and only recently realized a better way for shooting scale patterns. Thanks to Rayburn Guy! Shoot your white color basecoat. Shoot a medium gray (or any dark color you like) over the area to be scaled. Then put on the netting and shoot basecoat white over it. This makes for an extra step in the process but it makes for a much better defined, neater, scale pattern. After the last step you can remove the netting and mist on more white basecoat if desired to mute the scale pattern to taste. Then use transparent colors to finish painting over the scale effect.

I use Polytranspar Superhide White airbrush paint for color basecoating. It has lots of white pigment, shoots well, and dries very quickly to a hard semigloss finish. Most airbrush paint lines contain a heavily pigmented white paint designed just for basecoating. Polytranspar is just my favorite.

#9 RayburnGuy

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 01:22 PM

Here's something else I've learned to do that will make the scale patterns stand out better. After shooting whatever color I want the scales to be I go ahead and put the netting on the bait. This is done after heat setting of course. Once the netting is in place I shoot another coat of the same color over the netting. This is then heat set as normal. Sometimes the color your shooting over the scale pattern will try to bleed under the netting. This happens on lures that are shaped in such a way that it's hard to get the netting pulled tightly to the bait. Spraying the same scale color over the netting will form a kind of seal and your next color isn't as apt to bleed under the netting.

And spraying multiple light coats helps keep the paint from bleeding under your netting as well. Making sure your netting is pulled tightly on your bait helps as well. I like to fold the netting over the bait and then secure it by using two tongue depressors clamped over the netting with binder clamps. And when I say pulled tightly I mean tight. Quite often I tear the netting by pulling it so tight.

Ben

Edited by RayburnGuy, 20 July 2012 - 01:27 PM.


#10 bluetickhound

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 01:23 PM

Somebody recently mentioned the mosquito netting in the camping section at Walmart. I picked some up to try and it really works great for me!

#11 bluetickhound

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 01:26 PM

Ditto on the polytranspar! Its the best basecoat i have tried yet by a wide margin.

#12 garyo1954

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 05:33 PM

Ben bleeding is a problem with a lot of stencils. A too hard stencil can't be wrapped over the contour of the lure. A too soft stencil will have areas that lift on their own.

This one is just a test, but it has multiple problems. (It was shot at 8 lbs/PSI)

Posted Image

The bottle is cut in pine and I didn't sand the surface like I should have.
I was concerned the ribbon coming out of the eagle's beak would bleed, and didn't pay attention to the areas around the anchor.
Cutting and using small stencils leave some overspray. Need to come up with some usable standard size that prevents that.

What you've said, good stencil work requires, 1) good surface preparation and 2) a stencil that lays tightly against the surface make a lot of sense.

I agree with you.


G

#13 RayburnGuy

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 08:22 PM

Gary try lowering your air pressure and spraying lighter coats of paint. It may take multiple passes doing it like this, but the lower pressure will help keep the paint from blowing out under the edges of the stencil. Holding your brush back away from the bait will help also.

This is more of a problem with stiff stencils especially on baits with tight contours. The netting we use for scales conforms to the shape of the bait much better than stencils do so it's not as much trouble.

Ben

Edited by RayburnGuy, 20 July 2012 - 08:23 PM.


#14 garyo1954

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Posted 20 July 2012 - 11:36 PM

Ben wished I'd have seen this earlier.

I went out and bought a roll of cheap clear contact paper to recut the stencil.
Also picked up a bottle of Acrylic floor finish to thin the paint.
Definitely going to shoot it through an old airbrush before ruining one I like.

G

#15 snooterfish

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 09:55 AM

Anyone who had a drafting class (before computers) has one of these. LOL I have one that is 28 years old.


mine are 39 years old...and still going strong..lol

#16 Hokieangler

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 07:12 PM

Here's something else I've learned to do that will make the scale patterns stand out better. After shooting whatever color I want the scales to be I go ahead and put the netting on the bait. This is done after heat setting of course. Once the netting is in place I shoot another coat of the same color over the netting. This is then heat set as normal. Sometimes the color your shooting over the scale pattern will try to bleed under the netting. This happens on lures that are shaped in such a way that it's hard to get the netting pulled tightly to the bait. Spraying the same scale color over the netting will form a kind of seal and your next color isn't as apt to bleed under the netting.

And spraying multiple light coats helps keep the paint from bleeding under your netting as well. Making sure your netting is pulled tightly on your bait helps as well. I like to fold the netting over the bait and then secure it by using two tongue depressors clamped over the netting with binder clamps. And when I say pulled tightly I mean tight. Quite often I tear the netting by pulling it so tight.

Ben


Doesn't netting pull into your previous applied coats that have been heat set! That has been my experience anyway! I want to learn!



#17 RayburnGuy

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 09:29 PM

Hokie,

If the prior layer of paint has been thoroughly heat set it will be dry and not cause the problem you mentioned.

Ben

#18 greg.p

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 03:13 AM

put your air pressure UP. it helps push the stencil onto the surface. airbrush control seems to be the problem.

#19 Hokieangler

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 04:27 AM

Thank You!

#20 A-Mac

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Posted 30 October 2012 - 07:03 AM

The soap "scrunchy" bath things are good for scale patterns too. Very flexible, can be stretched to cover awkward contour, isn't abrasive against previous paint coats, oh, and you get about 10m for $1.

For clamps, I've been using the small metal rubber coated spring clamps you see at home depot. They are cheap, very strong, and the rubber coatings help to prevent scratching paint. The small size lets you put several 3-4 on the bait to have a tighter fit to the lures contours.