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Casting Spoon Newbie

spoon paint clear coat

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#1 Donnybrooks1979

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 05:05 PM

Hows it going everybody? Newbie here, and just painted up my first couple spoons. Now i'm just looking for a clear coat for them. Dick Nite clear coat is the front runner now. Any suggestions? Tips? For Spoons. Thanks.

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#2 Donnybrooks1979

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 09:26 PM

Sorry i don't think the links are working.

#3 BobP

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 09:39 PM

Dick Nite S81 (moisture cured urethane) is a great topcoat for painted metal spoons. Dip'em, hang'em, done. Can't get faster than that and the stuff is tough as nails on metal. I have jigging spoons painted with multiple heavy coats of acrylic based glow paint that were dipped once in Dick Nite as a topcoat. None of them have the slightest sign of wear after several years of use.

#4 Donnybrooks1979

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 08:58 PM

Dick Nite S81 (moisture cured urethane) is a great topcoat for painted metal spoons. Dip'em, hang'em, done. Can't get faster than that and the stuff is tough as nails on metal. I have jigging spoons painted with multiple heavy coats of acrylic based glow paint that were dipped once in Dick Nite as a topcoat. None of them have the slightest sign of wear after several years of use.

Awesome! I think im going to go with that. Now, my local shop the owner always warms me about painting nickel plated blanks. He tells me the paint wont grab, and begin to chip. (pretty obvious if there is no harder or top coat) I have panted up a few nickel plated and the paint seems to grab fine. He says that brass is better, and will paint better. What do you think of this? And, if you don't mind me asking, what metal finish are on the spoons you have painted?

#5 RayburnGuy

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 09:17 PM

I've painted a few casting spoons and used DN for a top coat. They were nickel plated and I took some fine sandpaper (something like 400 or 600 grit) and lightly scuffed them before painting. Giving them a dip in acetone to take off any oil or other contaminants before painting doesn't hurt either. The paint and DN top coat will hide the scuff marks and you'll never even know it was done.

Ben

#6 BobP

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 11:37 PM

Like Ben suggests, sanding the surface to create a little "tooth" helps. DN seems to soak into acrylic paint to bond with the metal so it is a very durable topcoat. I have some nickel coated flutter spoons painted with transparent acrylic paint and dipped in DN and they have held up well too. Can't remember whether I sanded them before painting or not. After trying epoxy as a spoon topcoat, the DN was a revelation - I would never consider using anything else now. After all, the stuff is custom formulated to coat the spoons that Dick Nite sells as his main business.

#7 Donnybrooks1979

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 08:46 PM

I've painted a few casting spoons and used DN for a top coat. They were nickel plated and I took some fine sandpaper (something like 400 or 600 grit) and lightly scuffed them before painting. Giving them a dip in acetone to take off any oil or other contaminants before painting doesn't hurt either. The paint and DN top coat will hide the scuff marks and you'll never even know it was done.

Ben

Ok thanks for the tips Ben!

#8 Donnybrooks1979

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 08:58 PM

Yea when

Like Ben suggests, sanding the surface to create a little "tooth" helps. DN seems to soak into acrylic paint to bond with the metal so it is a very durable topcoat. I have some nickel coated flutter spoons painted with transparent acrylic paint and dipped in DN and they have held up well too. Can't remember whether I sanded them before painting or not. After trying epoxy as a spoon topcoat, the DN was a revelation - I would never consider using anything else now. After all, the stuff is custom formulated to coat the spoons that Dick Nite sells as his main business.

Yea,when i mentioned Dick Nite top coat the local shop guy didn't know what i was talking about. So this is a definite next step in my process. I will post some pics spoons. Thanks again. Kevin

#9 RayburnGuy

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 10:50 PM

If you haven't already done so you might want to read up on how to use, and store, DN. There are numerous posts about DN with some very good info in them. Do a search in the archives for "tapping the can". This will get you started.

Ben

#10 Donnybrooks1979

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 01:47 PM

If you haven't already done so you might want to read up on how to use, and store, DN. There are numerous posts about DN with some very good info in them. Do a search in the archives for "tapping the can". This will get you started.

Ben

6t55 Ok thanks i'll defiantly read up on that.

#11 Donnybrooks1979

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 06:07 PM

Here are a couple of my first efforts. I'm going to post more in the gallery. My biggest problem so far is my airbrush set up. Its a Testors airbrush model set, which has the self propellant can. I clean the tubes and caps after every time i use it with warm water,like the directions suggest. I also use the small cleaning needle on them. But every time i go to use it again the paint is gummed up and doesn't spray right. Now, lately I've been having to soak the pieces in Acetone after every use. Kind of a pain in the butt. I'm thinking about upgrading to a set that uses an air compressor. Any suggestions on this? Good deals? Thanks.

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#12 bluetickhound

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 06:28 PM

An airbrush/compressor combo is no place to skimp. You dont have to spend a fortune but do spend the 2 to 3 hundred it takes to get a good setup. Iwata is, in my opinion, the industry standard for reliable, pro quality equipment at a reasonable price. There are numerous threads on airbrush advice... The search function will definitely get you all the info you need.... Plus some!! Also, not to be THAT guy... but I think you're supposed to post in the gallery first, before posting in a thread but i guess a couple of minutes either way isn't going to kill anyone... That being said, your work is top shelf!! Really nice!

Edited by bluetickhound, 15 July 2012 - 06:31 PM.


#13 Donnybrooks1979

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 07:24 PM

Whats up bluetickhound? Hey,no problem with me with you being "that guy". I didn't want to be 'that guy" that looked like the new guy. lol. So thanks for the heads up on that! Thanks for the info on the Airbrush too,i'll be shopping around. And the complements on my spoons are much appreciated! Now i wont go and get a big head about it, but it definitely gives me a little confidence with my new hobby.

#14 bluetickhound

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 08:37 PM

Im new at this too... After a few months of this its getting to the point where i actually enjoy making lures at LEAST as much as I do using them!!

#15 Donnybrooks1979

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 09:17 PM

Alright, i found some time to DN a couple spoons. Everything seemed to go decent. I only splats a little on my floor when i ran the screw in the first time. I really didn't realize how much this stuff would stick to your hands. It's now about five days after i did this and i still have clear coat on my hands. Gloves next time for sure. its a learning process tho. :) Next step is testing them out in the lower Niagara river in the next couple of weeks. Cant wait!

#16 Donnybrooks1979

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:43 PM

I tested my spoon around the first of the year. For the most part they held together good. I did lose some in the rocks along the Lower Niagara. Im still looking to get a better airbrush set up. This will be my big purchase with my tax returns.   





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