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Cutting/shaping G-10 Garolite


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#1 bluetickhound

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 11:44 AM

I tried using the search function and while there are many topics concerning G10 i really didnt see what i was looking for in any of them.... What method works (or seems to be the most effective) for initial cutting of Garolite and what is the commonly accepted procedure to get the bill into its final shape? Coping saw? Dremel? I bought some G10 from McMaster Carr so i could see for myself if i like it better than the lexan i have been using so far. I really dont dislike lexan but after spending a good bit if time reading everyones opinions/experience with garolite i decided the only way for me to know for sure is to get some and try it out!!

#2 BobP

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 11:59 AM

G10 is usually thinner and easier to cut than polycarbonate. I draw a lip shape on the G10 and use a pair of Wiss straight cut metal snips to rough cut the shape, keeping the cut a mm or less outside the line. Then I use a Dremel with a fine grit sanding cylinder to shape the lip down to the exact line. This is the fastest and most exact way I've found to shape lips. The metal snips go very fast. I use exactly the same technique for Lexan, plus use a felt polishing cylinder in my Dremel when finished to remove any residue and turn the edge transparent again. I use 1/16" thick Lexan and 1/32" G10 for all my baits. If you use stuff that's a lot thicker, at some point you might need to saw it on a band or scroll saw. When you cut Lexan or G10 with metal snips, you'll see that the tool cuts the material but also leaves a tiny "crush area" beside the cut. You can cut as close to the line as you want as long as the crush area does not hit the final lip line.

Compound Wiss metal snips come in several blade shapes (left curve, right curve, straight). The yellow handled snips are the straight cut tool. You can get them at most home centers for around $12.

Edited by BobP, 12 July 2012 - 12:03 PM.


#3 bluetickhound

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 12:39 PM

Thanks Bob! I have been using my yellow handled Wiss snips on lexan with great results but didn't know if they'd work on G10. Same for the dremel.. I have seen where folks had noted that G10 was hard to cut (but never specified exactly HOW they were cutting it!!) however, it machined easily... That's why i was asking the fine folks at TU! I knew i'd get a straight answer to a specific question.

#4 bluetickhound

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 12:46 PM

Really, the main (but not only) reason i have this itch to try out a G10 lip is that i have been very intrigued with the Waddle Bat crankbait ever since i saw the video a couple of weeks ago... I already have some blades cut out for the back hook hanger and the originals have a garolite bill... I assume there is a specific reason for this so i'm going to follow suit. I'm sure if i tinker around with the design long enough i'll be able to replicate the Waddle Bat. We'll see...

#5 littleriver

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 05:51 PM

Here is how I cut it.

http://www.tackleund...ay/page__st__20

Works well for lexan too but the G-10 cuts like butter.

#6 benton B

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 08:24 PM

If you crank thru rocks alot the g-10 will chip away at the corners over time. I still use it but just something to keep in mind. I use a regular file to finish the edges and then 400 grit sandpaper.

#7 BobP

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 09:56 PM

The laminate trimmer sounds like a great idea if you have some lip shapes you use often enough to warrant making the wooden template. I rarely build any lip design in quantity so am not sure it would be cost effective. But a great idea nevertheless.

Benton - yeah, it will wear away on rocks eventually but the rebound action of G10 on rock is probably the main reason why it became popular.

Edited by BobP, 12 July 2012 - 09:59 PM.


#8 bluetickhound

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Posted 13 July 2012 - 12:13 PM

Got my g-10 today. It cuts easier than the lexan! As usual, i read too much and over processed the whole deal.... One thing i picked up on and will definitely do is wear a respirator when grinding down with the dremel.

Edited by bluetickhound, 13 July 2012 - 12:18 PM.


#9 mark poulson

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Posted 14 July 2012 - 10:03 AM

Semi-hijack.....
I typically epoxy my 1/8" lexan crankbait bills in before I do the final shaping of the sides. Then I use a belt sander to shape them.
I've noticed that I get little stress cracks along the edges I sand. Not big enough to be a problem, but visible.
I'm assuming it's from the heat of the sanding.
Has anyone else had that experience.