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Imakatsu Waddle Bat

hunting crankbait

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#1 AJLures.com

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 03:26 PM

Has anyone tried one of these without the rear blade?  I wonder if it would still hunt?

 

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#2 BobP

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 03:53 PM

I think the rear blade is what causes it to hunt.



#3 RayburnGuy

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 04:10 PM

Pretty sure Bob is right. That's the whole purpose of the of the rear blade.



#4 AJLures.com

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 05:14 PM

Pretty sure Bob is right. That's the whole purpose of the of the rear blade.

 

Seems too easy!  Why not just throw a rear blade on all cranks?



#5 Sonny.Barile

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:25 PM

Cause you dont want all cranks to hunt.



#6 littleriver

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:29 PM

I have made a few and it was not that easy for me. Once you have have it figured out, I suppose it would be easy for a manufacturer to stamp them out. Not sure why no american manufacturer except maybe patents but then that doesn't seem to stop the copy catting that goes on all the time. But probably the most important reason is no demand for it. When the market says they are needed, like maybe a high profile tourney win with one. Why make one with a blade when your selling millions without one.  



#7 Vodkaman

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 08:39 PM

Just my opinion, but I don't think the blade has anything to do with the hunt. I think it is there for added bling. If the blade was removed, it would disturb the balance, but it might well still hunt. Interesting design though.

 

Dave



#8 stretcher66

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 09:17 PM

It looks to me like it could cause you to miss strikes on the rear hook, with the blade being fastened directly to the hook.



#9 RayburnGuy

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 11:07 PM

I've built a couple baits that I put Colorado spinner blades on the rear. Not sure you would call the action "hunting", but it did through the balance off and made the bait run erratically. I have no doubt these lures would run without the spinner blades on the rear, but feel confident the erratic action would be lost. Just my :twocents:

 

Ben



#10 Vodkaman

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 04:15 AM

I will explore this concept next time I get my tank up and running. Ants have eaten away some of the structural beams and so I have some rebuilding to do.

 

Dave



#11 littleriver

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 07:10 AM

I can't speak for the waddle bat because i do not own one but my own version did not have the action shown in the videos until the blade was installed. I swam my protos without blade first and added the blade later.  The blade is  what gave my copy it's unique waddle bat action whether you call it hunting or waddling.  The blade is a very active part of the baits action. 



#12 nova

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 10:00 AM

If you take a look at the pic you will notice the back hook is not in the traditional place. Also, the back of the bait has an angle cut . This will allow the blade to be pushed back into that position by the hook as it is brought through the water causing the hydrodynamic flow around the bait to change, making it hunt.

 

I've never built one and I've never fished one. This is just my observation of the picture posted.

 

I could be totally wrong.


Edited by nova, 16 January 2013 - 10:01 AM.


#13 Vodkaman

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 10:35 AM

I have just managed to have a look at half the video (bad internet service), certainly an exciting lure. Quite an erratic hunt action. I agree, it is all about the plate and nothing to do with traditional hunt theory.

 

Plate size is probably a critical balance thing. I take back my first comment :)

 

Dave



#14 BobP

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 01:08 PM

I think you'll find getting the right size blade and shape on a Waddle Bat type lure is quite finicky.  I tried making one and quickly saw that it would take more testing and modifying than I was willing to do.  The rear hook hooking power was also a ? for me.  And I'm asking myself how wild a hunting action do you really want or need on a crankbait? Does wildly erratic necessarily translate into more bites?  JMHO, the answer is "not always".

 

We need a trained voting committee of highly intelligent mutant bass to run all this stuff by.  Then they can tell us what works and what won't.  But I suspect bass are just too moody to trust their judgement.



#15 AJLures.com

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 02:22 PM

Does wildly erratic necessarily translate into more bites? 
Yes!?

 

I have noticed that bass will often strike a crankbait after it deflects off something like a rock or stump and changes direction.  The hunters change direction without the structure and draw more strikes in open water????



#16 littleriver

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 02:37 PM

Bob

 

I ran my homemades by several finicky bass held up in isolated brush last fall and honestly have to say none of them went for it but they did not seem to go for much of anything except white super flukes. 

 

I guess every lure has it's day; hopefully!



#17 mark poulson

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 09:33 PM

Bob

 

I ran my homemades by several finicky bass held up in isolated brush last fall and honestly have to say none of them went for it but they did not seem to go for much of anything except white super flukes. 

 

I guess every lure has it's day; hopefully!

 

Must have been moody females!



#18 SlowFISH

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 05:58 PM

I think you'll find getting the right size blade and shape on a Waddle Bat type lure is quite finicky.  I tried making one and quickly saw that it would take more testing and modifying than I was willing to do.  The rear hook hooking power was also a ? for me.  And I'm asking myself how wild a hunting action do you really want or need on a crankbait? Does wildly erratic necessarily translate into more bites?  JMHO, the answer is "not always".

 

We need a trained voting committee of highly intelligent mutant bass to run all this stuff by.  Then they can tell us what works and what won't.  But I suspect bass are just too moody to trust their judgement.

 

I agree.... I bought a Waddle Bait last year after reading a few "hunting crank" threads, becuase as always, I had to know what I was missing taht would cause fish to jump in my boat...  I was not able to get the lure to run like the video (maybe I just suck).  I found it like most unstable cranks to be, well.... unstable..... when burned it I could get it to roll, it seemed to need a constant retrieve (not too fast, not too slow) to work best.  Between that and picking weeds off the trebles I put it back in the box and figured I'd bust it out this spring before the weeds come back up.

 

I tried to roughly mock up my own by using a LC knock off crank from one of the popular unpainted lure vendors.    I removed the rear hanger and added one under the tail with a small colorado blade.  There is a delicate balance you'll need to work out as most of the blades I tried made it sink (backwards) as soon as it hit the water and were basically un-usable.... I found using a very light / small blade solved this, but didn't get the hunt.  In the end I figured I wasn't worth figuring out.... but should this info help someone else with the energy, go for it.  If I tried again, I'd make sure to use an aluminum blade to start with or cut a few different shapes from plastic or very thin sheet aluminum and swap them out till you find a good combo.  You may also want ot start with a very boyant bait... the plastic knockoffs probably didn't help me, probably woudl have been better trying a balsa type bait that could have suspended a bigger blade.

 

 It's definitley something challenging, but you'll have to put your time in.... good luck

 

       J.



#19 bluetickhound

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 07:00 PM

I have been tinkering with my version of this bait for several months now and have had limited success. The blade shape is important but there is a curvature to it also... Very tricky, at least for me, to get right. Almost all of my baits have caught fish but the action is hard to pin down on a lure to lure basis.