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Painting cedar lures- bare wood to clearcoat -(polyurethane)


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#1 dragline

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Posted 04 April 2005 - 04:14 PM

Please help,
When painting large cedar lures, taking the process from bare wood to top coat(polyurethane) what are the steps. Also, any product brand names would be very much appreciated. Thanks a Lot!

#2 Skeeter

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Posted 04 April 2005 - 05:46 PM

dragline,

There are many folks on this site that paint. I really don't think that many do it the same as the next guy. Have you used and airbrush before? Where do you plan on doing your painting? The reason that I ask is because spraying with lacquers involve solvents and thinners. Not a good thing to do in the house. You cannot erase mistakes with lacquer paint either. Water based paints are safer and easier to clean up. They are much more practical for the novice ( and experienced ) to use.
Skeeter

#3 dragline

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Posted 04 April 2005 - 06:32 PM

Skeeter,
Thanks for replying. As you can see this is all knew to me. I think I'm going to take some of the guys advice and use the kilz as a Sealer and primer. Could you give me the brand name of a good black latex base coat. Thanks again

#4 out2llunge

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Posted 04 April 2005 - 08:39 PM

Stay away from polyurethane - it will yellow over time and doesn't provide the best finish. Try using Envirotech Lite (Etex) as your topcoat. It's much better, but requires careful mixing and prep prior to use.

You can also use lacquer sanding sealer for a sealer coat.

#5 RiverMan

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Posted 04 April 2005 - 10:54 PM

If you are building large lures like those for musky a sealer cannot be overstressed. If you do not get them properly sealed you will be plagued with bubbles, believe me, I know! If you are using eastern red cedar like the stuff used for making cedar trunks you will experience far less trouble than western red cedar which is far less dense. If this is your first bait keep it simple, white body black head, red body black head, yellow body black head, etc.

RM

#6 Skeeter

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 03:27 AM

I started painting using water based latex house paint. I shot it through the airbrush with good results. I still use it in some applications. I started buying it in pints from Lowes. It was made by Velspar. I don't think that the brand is dead on important as the quality. What I mean is that any high quality latex house paint will work. You can get it for about 3.00 a pint. That is dead cheap for paint. It thins with water and you can wipe off mistakes before they dry with a damp rag. You have to be patient with it and let it dry between coats, but the colors show up and hold up really well. The other option is Createx. Alot of folks use that. It is water based also. It is an acrylic and dries pretty quick compared to the latex. Both of these paints will clean up well from your airbrush with hot soapy water. They will also wash out of your clothes. There are no real fumes and they definitely aren't harmful. If I can be of any more help, just ask.
Skeeter

#7 KingKarl

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 07:07 AM

Dragline,
I use Wextern red cedar over here in OZ, and like the other guys I use water based paints finished off with an Auto Acrylic sealer comes up schmicko, but the I think the real work is done before you even apply any sealers, basecoats etc. make sure you get your timber as smoooth as possible but making sure the grain runs from ft to back then use 80grt, 120grt and then the finest sanding paper you can find I use 400grt. Once Ive sanded back I get some metho (white spirit) and clean up the blank. then stick the blank in the oven for 15min to heat up the body so to expell any air from within the wood. whilst the wood is still hot I seal it with a two pak marine sealer called Everdure from International , the first coat is a real thirst one so put plenty on your brush. once it's dry i sand it back with the 400grt and repeat the sealing another 2 times. I've found the this realy hardens the timber ,get rid of any air bubbles and leaves me with a super smooth surface to paint on
hope this helps
KArl

#8 Mallard

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 01:22 PM

You didn't mention what type of cedar you use. I use white and western red. The red can bleed through to the paint so I take extra care in sealing the wood.

These are the steps I use:
1 Shape and sand
2 Brush on thick coat of Evirontex epoxy
3 Allow to penatrate for a few minutes
4 Wipe off excess so as not to add too much weight
5 Hang to dry for at least 24 hours (48 is better)
6 Lightly sand with 300 grit sanding pad
7 Spray on Krylon Fusion white as primer
8 Airbrush or stroke on water based arclyic
9 Allow to dry at least 24 hours, I often hit it with a blow dryer
10 Top coat with epoxy (E-Tex or Devcon 2-ton)
11 Dry on drying wheel

When I make heavier bait for saltwater use I skip steps 2-4 and instead just use a thick coat of Devcon 2-ton.

Hope this helps.
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#9 Mallard

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 01:29 PM

then stick the blank in the oven for 15min to heat up the body so to expell any air from within the wood. whilst the wood is still hot I seal it.


I never though of heating the wood before sealing. Even though I use epoxy to seal I think this step may help absorption.

What temperature do you set the oven at? Does anyone else do this?

#10 Oncorhynchus_tshawytscha

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 08:33 PM

So when I use Kilz 2, I'm not actually sealing the lure? I started using it because someone here said it did both seal and prime. So do I need to epoxy first, then use Kilz? Hope I'm not doing anything wrong.

Brock

#11 RiverMan

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Posted 05 April 2005 - 08:54 PM

That is fine brock so long as you aren't building some real big baits. I have found that bigger baits require additional sealing! Use the kilz, let dry a full day or longer in a warm home, then go to paint, wait another day, then go to clearcoat. Watch out if you are using western red cedar, it's very light and not the best choice.

Jed