Jump to content

Leaderboard

  1. BobP

    BobP

    TU Member


    • Points

      2

    • Content Count

      5,715


  2. rattlesnake

    rattlesnake

    TU Member


    • Points

      1

    • Content Count

      10


  3. smalljaw

    smalljaw

    TU Member


    • Points

      1

    • Content Count

      2,518


  4. mark poulson

    mark poulson

    TU Sponsor


    • Points

      1

    • Content Count

      14,253


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/14/2014 in all areas

  1. Yep, as you can see, there are lots of options that work. Which you choose depends on how you want to process your topcoat/undercoat, how patient you are in letting topcoats harden, and how much you want to spend. For wood baits, I still like Devcon Two Ton epoxy after a dozen years of building lures. It's tough, hardens over night to a nice level, thick, beautiful finish. You have to brush epoxies on and it's recommended that you use a lure turner afterwards to keep the epoxy from sagging or dripping until it begins to harden. You can use Devcon both as an undercoating/primer and a topco
    2 points
  2. Painted with createx, nice hard shell with d2t. ready to catch fish in the spring.
    1 point
  3. I'll give you some tips, I, like Cadman, use Worth blades exclusively but if you are buying from Barlows or Lure Parts Online be sure to ask which blades they use, I got an Order from Lure Parts Online and found that they were selling Lakeland blades and while they are good too, they don't match up in size to Worth. An example would be a size 4.5 in a Lakeland is a size 5 in a Worth so if you buy from Barlows or Lure Parts or any of those places, stick with them as each will carry a different manufacturer.
    1 point
  4. Not to mention powder paint is next to bullet proof.
    1 point
  5. I know everyone has an opinion, but I don't know how much easier it could be than using powder paint. I do beleive many people don't go to the step of heating the paint after dipping their bait, and it won't stay on very well without doing it. It is soo much easier, than what was offered years ago.
    1 point
  6. Wrinkling is caused by either a solvent reacting with an underlying paint, or because the film strength of the top coat is so strong it pulls on the weaker underlying paint so hard it actually pulls it apart, like with crackle finishes. Air brush paint that is not properly dried is still weak. That goes for thick coats that never truly get heat set. Properly dried acrylic paint won't be affected by AC1315, in my experience. The same goes for other urethane coatings, nail polishes, and epoxy finishes. I've dipped all of them now, and had no wrinkling. I even rushed my paint job on a lur
    1 point
  7. Well only two I have used that I have found doesn't settle out are Bears Calhouns and MF plastic. But still you should mix with a drill and stirrer if your using 5 or 2.5 gal containers.
    1 point
  8. I think you take submissions for a certain length of time but no voting until submission ends, then have a voting period.
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...
Top