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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/10/2020 in all areas

  1. While I can certainly understand and respect that argument and your point of view on the topic - especially given personal experiences (and that gut-wrenching photo! Ouch!!) - were you the one who made the lures that the screw eyes came out of, or were they lures you purchased? Do you know if they were made properly? How old were the lures when they failed? Were there other signs of damage to the lure - something that perhaps the user should have seen (epoxy failure, cracking, etc), that would otherwise have been a sign of "it's time to retire this lure" if not for the emotional and/or fi
    1 point
  2. I have heard and used lures with all those methods of installing hook hangers. The only one I really trust is wire thru. It isn't a question of how strong it is brand new, it is the question of time. We change our fishing line so it maintains the 20lb rating? We change split rings? We change hooks? We sharpen hooks?. We can't do the same with a lure hook hanger. When musky fishing, you may go an entire season before having the briefest encounter with a 40lb fish if you are lucky enough, and when you set the hook and all you feel is a expensive lure fly back at you it makes you question y
    1 point
  3. I use barrel twisted eyes in my small cranks. I catch Bawal 7Lb - 12Lb regularly. These deep bodied fish can really pull. Never had a failure. Actually, even these twisted eyes are linked to the hook hanger, so I suppose you could call it a through wire. BUT, I cannot imagine trying to wrestle with an angry 40Lb Musky with all its leverage. Why would anyone take the risk of losing such a stunning fish, not to mention the damage to the fish as mentioned above. The dowel idea is good, it is a surface area thing. Dave
    1 point
  4. I think this air is put intentionally to make the bait noise down when paused on the bottom other baits like the mat lures bluegill have this as well
    1 point
  5. Not trying to start a debate just offering a few tips that were passed on to me. My neighbor used to build some Musky, Pike and a few saltwater plugs told me he always epoxied his hook hangers into hardwood dowel, then epoxies the dowels into his baits, he once said he never wanted the hanger or lure to fail before the line. We used his theory on some baits and if done this way the line is always the weakest link. I build bass baits so line for sure is the weak link and it doesn't take much to strengthen your line ties, belly weights and wood dowels in the tails never fail if good strong bondi
    1 point
  6. That's interesting. You would think with a name like Huddleston, there would be no flaws. Either that or the air pocket worked and they said if it ain't broke, don't fix it. LOL
    1 point
  7. Big Epp a fish aquarium here is your friend, float test. I was going to suggest unpainted lure blanks similar so you can see the weight how its distributed, but with wood it's going to be slightly different. A suggestion would be spend lots of time tank testing, assemble and seal your lure, then use suspend strips and small dia. lead solder to wrap around hook hangers. With a wood lure you still might need a little tail weight to get it right.? Ive spent countless hours tank testing prototypes before ever lake testing or finishing a lure. Attitude in how a lure sits in the water will tell you
    1 point
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