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  1. This is a tale of multiple ‘happy accidents’ making a memorable lure. I have a bond with this lure that is tempting me to not retire it, even though it belongs on the wall now. My favorite lure is one I call Dicky Moe after the whale in a Tom & Jerry cartoon. The cartoon whale was the first thing I thought of when the lure was finished. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bttiQVVweJE It is all white, 9.75” long, and weighs 3.1 oz. without the hooks. The bait came out longer than expected because I forgot to take into account the joint gaps would add close to an inch of length
    4 points
  2. If those are your first baits man you are well on your way! They look great. In my day job I am a network engineer so I can appreciate the fact that you used the two sides from an old computer case for your painting booth. That's awesome man:) You have for sure found yourself in the land of bait makers here. Everyone here is extremely helpful and listening to their advice will only make you better at this amazing hobby. There have been so many good tips provided here and I'd like to give you a couple as well. Just a couple of tips to make things easier for you I guess. I used to have HP
    4 points
  3. @Skeeter what I know that is different about it is that it was designed to have no toxic fumes because several well known lure makers had died of cancer and Joe, the guy that developed it, did so as a response to that. As far as anything about the product that makes it more suited to lure making I am not sure. It does work like a charm though. First time using it and I got the best, nearly flawless topcoat I’ve ever gotten:
    4 points
  4. Rubbish, the dolphin showed no interest in the lure what so ever! Just kidding, great work, looks amazing Dave
    4 points
  5. RPM - It must have been a huge buoyancy force to have that effect, as you stated. The other clue is the 'thumping' action. This is an indication that the lure is swimming at a very steep angle. The drag from the lip is very high but the down force is small. The optimum angle is around 45 degrees for maximum depth. This smaller angle presents less lip, so less thump but more down force. To achieve this, your tow eye needs to go further forward. Dave
    4 points
  6. You are correct and many would find making baits is a losing endeavor if they put any dollar value on their time. Building cranks one off is about the least efficient way to make cranks. Multiples pay off as less time is wasted setting up tools, measurements, etc.. Some aspects are rather quick so may just knock out a bunch of blanks for future use. May take 30 minutes and drill all the hook hanger and belly weights, etc.. (jig holds the blank in position on drill press). I will just keep blanks in plastic shoe boxes or shallow tool box trays in different stages. If ti
    3 points
  7. Ya, I agree. I am NOT an artist. My painting proves it. But, the fish don't care one bit. LOL
    3 points
  8. JD_mudbug & Mark I agree, Iv'e been building handcrafted lures for quite a while and have had some great success with them, but the one that sticks out to me was a tournament buddy of mine asked me to build him a pair of shallow water crankbaits for a certain situation, I built 2 and painted them in a japaneese style or version of sexy shad. He fished them the weekend after picking them up and caught over 30 bass ( 1 day ) with those lures. So I'd have to say seeing someone else, especially a buddy fish your creation and have success would be my best. I've built this particular lure for ma
    3 points
  9. I use 1/4" and 3/16" lead wire, so all I have to do is drill that size hole, and super glue in the correct weight of wire. Here is one source, but there are others online: https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/bullet-weights-lead-wire?hvarAID=shopping_googleproductextensions&ds_e=GOOGLE&ds_c=Shop|Generic|AllProducts|High|SSCCatchAll&gclid=Cj0KCQiA0fr_BRDaARIsAABw4EtgIb3rOqrUGUiDN1LzC_kIEFWfbGsqSVf0GUJPMuyGigThCO48_rcaAlAbEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
    3 points
  10. Sealing? NO Base coating? normally yes to get a good paint job.
    3 points
  11. A quick video highlighting a few modifications to my 10" WEN 3962 bandsaw http://rvbprecision.com/machine-tools-welding/wen-3962-bandsaw-modifications-walk-around.html
    3 points
  12. Selling baits... Few ways to go with depending on your goals. Identify your goals and do what best suits those goals. High end quality baits aimed at getting $$$$$, knocking out baits quick and selling numbers for cheap, are you trying to just break even, make money, etc.. Finally I will say do a search about Federal Excise Tax and fishing lures....at least be aware of Form 720 Part II No. 41.
    3 points
  13. There are a bunch of different types of lipless crankbaits. A flatfish is just one type of many different types of lipless cranks. The one in your pic was a common style years ago similar to the Heddon Bayou Boogie, Pico Chico, Storm Whiz Bang, Buckeye Shad Lipless Crank. Poe's also made a lipless back in the day similar to your pic. Although some of the older style baits are still being sold, that older style seems to have fallen out of favor since the Rattle Trap type baits gained in popularity. Your pic does have the line tie lower than most of the older baits. The pictured lure'
    3 points
  14. Why would you need to modify the mold? Do you want to use a different hook that might not fit? Are you wanting to change or add something? You only have to modify a mold if you want to use a hook that doesn't fit, or if you want to add a wire keeper or something else. I'll be honest, get a mold that you want that has all the elements you want without making changes. Don't worry about the hook brand, if you don't like a hook that the mold calls for there usually are alternatives and members here will let you know what fits. I say that because a lot of times a modified mold could get finicky and
    3 points
  15. Man.....what an INCREDIBLE thread! This is why I am here to stay. I want to learn and one cannot help but do so by watching you all converse about such topics. You have all proven time and time again to be very intelligent and deeply creative, each of you in your own right, thinkers and craftsmen. This is hands down the most helpful and knowledgable community on the Interwebs. I'd rather read threads like this than "Netflix and Chill" any day. Great stuff! I came into this hobby two years ago from a nearly zero woodworking background and because of everyone here I am making baits that I
    3 points
  16. I like double pin joints, this gives maximum freedom to the hinge as one joint has two pivots. Strength-wise, the load is distributed along the length of the pin, perpendicular to the pull direction, you would have to rip the lure in half to break it. There are so many joint solutions and I cannot say that any are particularly bad. Whether a joint will fail or not all comes down to your design; screw-eyes too short, area around pin to thin, inadequate sealing, etc. Hinges are all about free movement, even the slightest resistance to movement will cancel out the action. Rear facing V-
    3 points
  17. Amazing how efficiency picks up when using 18 molds.
    3 points
  18. Lots of good info and advice given here. It would take me a week to put my thoughts down on the subject in such a way that would be helpful. I have a tendency to talk in circles and am much better at building than explaining things. I don't have a physics degree or any knowledge other than what I've learned through many years of screwing up. My advice for any new builder is to try to duplicate an existing bait that is a known producer. Templates for different styles are out there if you look around online. My first builds were a Shad Rap profile that I was able to find this pattern for. B
    3 points
  19. 3 points
  20. So I finished my first batch. Thank-you everyone for the advice. Worth it's weight in gold. Quite happy with the way the run. Made MANY mistakes along the way. Not happy with how blotchy the epoxy set. I made a rotisserie, and hit them with a heat gun - but not the most ideal finish to be honest (30 minute epoxy). My eyes aren't the size I wanted - I had ordered some online, and are"6-8 weeks behind" on shipping. I had to pivot and get other ones - that don't fit the way I want. I used an avacado bag for the scales - my template didn't show up. I need a good firetiger template.
    3 points
  21. I've made several large deep diving lures that hit 25+ feet (obviously speed/how much line makes a different). These are trolling baits, 14" (plus 3" of lip) 12-16oz. I think the tow point makes a huge difference, how far up or down the lip or the body it is. It is the pivot of how much your lip can rotate "down" and pull the bait with it. Now I'm only speaking from making large lures, so I think there is more room for error or variances in weight and slight imperfections. Correct me if I'm wrong here, but how much does the actual weight of a deep diver make a difference. From my
    3 points
  22. People do not buy hand made baits because they are cheap, they buy because the lure is unique and of the highest quality. Your bait has to gain a reputation for catching MORE fish than the chunk of plastic on the shelf at Walmart. Yes, you need a pro angler on board who believes in your lure. A Kevin Van Dam is not going to get the job done, people will not attribute his success to the lure but to the man himself. I would take my lure to a struggling pro, get him to try the lure, prove that it is a fish magnet, then you can both retire on the lure's success. Only my opinion; cha
    2 points
  23. I also view crankbaits as expendable and I don’t have customers who expect (unreasonably) that they last forever. That doesn’t mean I want them to disintegrate an hour into a hot crankbait bite though. I undercoat with epoxy and topcoat with various stuff - MCU, UV resin, or epoxy. So my baits have 2 tough waterproof coatings. That’s enough for me. But all of us are “rolling their own” and if you want 10 layers of finish on your bait for some reason, well, no fault, no foul.
    2 points
  24. I use mostly Lexan (polycarbonate). I know Lexan is just a brand name. It is easier to type and is shorter than Makrolon. In addition to the fish species, I also look at the size of the bait. If I make a 10" 3 oz slammer type bait for bass, I am still going to use a thicker 1/8" lip. That size bait will crack a thin lip when it hits the water on the cast. Generally, I go with .093" Lexan for small lures 4" to 6.5" usually under 1.5 ounces. I go with 1/8" (.125") Lexan for bigger lures 6.5" to 11" that range from 1.5 to 3.5 ounces. For lures bigger or heavier than those, I go with 3/16" Le
    2 points
  25. So much good info already! Check out this video for a solid looking through-wire method. I think it lines up with what @eastman03 is talking about: A bandsaw is super helpful! I was able to pick one up on Craigslist for $20. They don't typically go that cheap, but don't think you can't find one if you look long enough. As for making and cutting lips, what thicknesses and materials do you all prefer? I know there's going to be a difference from a bass bait to a muskie bait. What thickness polycarbonate can be cut with snips?
    2 points
  26. @eastman03always has the best advice when it comes to musky lures! The only thing I would add to this other than what has already been said, is that when I drill through wire for larger baits, I prefer to drill a pilot hole with a shorter drill bit first for the nose and tail of the bait. The smaller drill bit is much easier to 'aim' and will not wander as much as the long drill bits. It takes a lot of practice but it definitely can be done! The first through wire construction baits I made were the slot method which is the easiest in my opinion but still very time consuming. I prefer
    2 points
  27. Lots of great advice here already! I like hearing that you want to make thru wire, as a musky lure maker I agree! As far a lips, i like lexan. Could probably use a coping saw to get close (or jig saw), they are cheap and can cut rounded edges. Then files/sander to finish the job. A belt sander with the small disc sander attached would be extremely helpful! I use mine a lot. Ideally in the future, a bandsaw for sure. Through wire methods all have their pros and cons. Cutting the lure right in half can make the final product more seamless, as you can dremel or use a knife to hi
    2 points
  28. 1 - a band saw and a belt sander would make all your Lexan problems go away. But if you do not plan to tool up a man-cave then the only alternative that I see is a sanding disk attachment for a regular power drill. 2 - the swivels idea will work, but your problem is going to be drilling the hole down the center of the body. This can be achieved with a drill press, but without a press it would be a difficult task. I like the slot along the back of the body and drop holes down for the hook loops. The slot is easily filled and tidied up. Another solution is to start with two halves
    2 points
  29. Technically white, black, yellow, blue, red, silver, and maybe gold would be the bare bones that one can mix to make about all colors. Check out color wheels and color theory for more information. I would personally add a brown and chartreuse. Can add all sorts of other colors to make things easier but if we are purely talking budget then above is more consistent with what you are looking for. The createx kits aren't bad in regards to prepackaged colors. If you have a hobby lobby you can use the 40% discount coupon on the primary kit and come in around 17 bucks for 6 colors.
    2 points
  30. @Big Epp linke @Brick Steel said above I also use a 6 gallon compressor. Works great and has a built in regulator with water trap. I usually just turn it on and let it fill up, which takes about a minute and a half I guess, then I turn it off and use it until empty. Depending on the paint scheme it can sometimes get me through an entire bait before I need to turn it on to fill up again.
    2 points
  31. Juice this has come up a few times, check out Lincoya here on TU He posted a video of routing bills using templates, very fast and effective way of cutting your bill / bibs.
    2 points
  32. Fairly straight forward equation and several online calculators or if you have an experience with excel can whip it out. Volume of the hole (cylinder) is needed then you multiply by density. So the weight would be: Wt=[π⋅r2⋅h]⋅ d So all you need to do is substitute in your known variables. We know pi, r2 is equal to the diameter (simply the drill bit size used), h would be the height or in our case the depth of the hole, and finally d is the density of the material used to fill the hole.
    2 points
  33. My favorite metallic colors are: Wicked gold, Wicked silver, and Craftsmart metallic Titanium (if you can find it). But if you want true metallic shine, get some fingernail art foil in metallic silver and holographic silver. There are tutorials on this forum on how to do this. Metallic paints can be applied over a black or white base. The effects are quite different. A quick pass fine mist can also be sprayed over a completed paint job. It acts almost like glitter. Have fun
    2 points
  34. I personally don’t like the heavy .040 blades on inline spinners unless the lure is a big musky bucktail type lure (size 7 and up blades). The .040 blades are harder to get spinning at the start of a retrieve. The heavy blade is much easier to get spinning on a spinnerbait than an inline spinner. You need the extra thickness of a .040 blade for musky bucktails because they are far more likely to bend a .025 blade. The .025 blades are fine for bass inlines and easier to start on the retrieve. An inline will not get the same vibration as a spinnerbait. On a spinnerbait, a blade is at the
    2 points
  35. Followup: 5233K51 from McMaster-Carr was perfect.
    2 points
  36. Hi everyone and thank you for taking the time to read my post. With the ice fishing season just getting started in my area (Saginaw Bay Mi). I thought I would try to make some soft plastic baits for ice fishing. I picked up a couple of maggot molds a few months ago to make baits for the Blue Gill we get in the canals in the fall. I thought I would try my luck at making a core shot maggot. This is what I came up with. The mold wasn’t made to do this and I didn’t do any modifications to the mold at all. They make core shot molds for worms, Ned worms, and paddle tails but I didn’t find what I was
    2 points
  37. When I am airbrushing I keep a ice cream pail next to me with hot water with a little soap in it and when I change colors I just keep cleaning the brush till clear. End of day I just run some airbrush cleaner through it and done for the day. Just to check I at sometime I just take out the needle and wipe it clean if some paint on it. Stay ahead of the game and keep problems to a minimum. Wayne
    2 points
  38. We're talking about mostly 4, 6 or 8 ounce batches here but, i don't use hardner or softener. If i want a harder mix i just add hard to soft or medium & if i want it softer i just add soft to medium or hard. Doing it like this the only thing that changes is firmness because my colors, amount of glitter, highlights etc. stay exactly the same & so do the amount of plastic used in each shot. I use heat stabilizer on old remelts that i store in coffee cans. Working in small batches like i do makes it easy to tweak them any way i want & still be pretty consistent. Sometime
    2 points
  39. @exx1976 Do you mind sending me a DM about what it was you found out?
    2 points
  40. Try posting this in the Wire Baits forum. You'll probably get better ideas there. For lead ingots Ebay.
    2 points
  41. +1 = I do exact same thing.... set up the pots - let them run while i get all my other crap together. Beauty is you really don't have to pay attention cause its automated. And to answer and earlier question.... Do you need an auto stirrer? - no - but - Is it super convenient - yep - Save plastic as Dave mentioned - yep - Make life easier.... absolutely. J.
    2 points
  42. And remember that is a 9 year old video. Things for me have changed. I have been using something I made years ago but never made a video of it. Soon I will make a video of it and you will see all that I have learned over the years from actually doing it. It’s simple to use and easy to fix if needed. And uses something about 3000 of you already have.
    2 points
  43. Wasn't saying it was a scam just I doubt it is much more than a repackaged product. I have come across the product on a few forums and some of the claims made by users should be highlighted on the site as it would really separate it from other similar products. However no real attempt has been made. I have no doubt the product works. I have used Etex Light, Devcon, Bob Smith, and several DIY bar top epoxies with out much issue either (only make bass baits). I wouldn't hesitate to try it.
    2 points
  44. There are no real claims on their "site" for a reason. Much of what one hears regarding the product are just guys making claims. Their site isn't really put together that well compared to most businesses/companies would put together. Guarantee if they had tested the product they would clearly have it listed on the site. Also will notice (may have overlooked it) that no SDS is on the site for the product. I think it is more likely a guy found a way to make some supplemental income and it is just a repackaged product with a markup. Perhaps something from Specialty Resin. https
    2 points
  45. Shouldn't be a problem as you NEVER let ANY resin product touch your skin. If you can smell it then you need ventilation, mix it outside or use a fan. Dave
    2 points
  46. Solid tip right there! I'll have to remember that if I ever use those. I have a bunch in a box but never used them before. But those are GREAT first lures! I can't build a crankbait to save my life so this is much better than I've ever done.
    2 points
  47. Assume your using a microwave if your cleaning the injector each time.... Presto pot with stirring can speed you way up.... as you leave the injector in the pot after shooting - so no cleaning/purging the leftover each time - plus once molds ready to go - no waiting to heat plastic - just shoot - makes a bit difference. J.
    2 points
  48. Hey - if your first batch actually swims, you did better than I did my first attempt out. LOL I'm on iteration #3 of my crankbaits. Iteration #2 had one promising lure of the 4 I tested, so now I've made 4 more with slight variations on weight placement nose to tail, and I hope to be able to test those in a local hotel pool Sunday night. With any luck, one of those 4 will end up my production version. Not bad, considering I'm almost 3 months into this. LOL
    2 points
  49. I’ve made a bunch of these, with blades, without blades, attached the blades in different ways. Bought my harnesses, made my own. There’s a lot of ways to put them together. If you use a clevis, there are other components you must also use. What you will find is loading all those components, crimping, placement, etc. takes a lot of time and is quite fatiguing putting a five wire arig together. After a bunch of trying this and that I landed on a component that makes a real clean unit and will cut down on your work. Rosco tackle makes a component called a Swivel Sleeve that will replace sleeves,
    2 points
  50. RPM - I do have an explanation, but Vodkaman's home made vodka has kicked in fairly severely at this time. So I will address the explanation tomorrow. All will be explained Dave
    2 points
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