Legendary Lures

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About Legendary Lures

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    http://www.legendarylures.com
  1. lip jig

    If you are tracing a pattern onto your blank material, here's some ideas that may speed things up a little and give more consistancy. Use Microsoft Paint to design the lip, if making a new lip, or draw one of your current lips into Paint. You could take a digital picture of an existing lip and strip the picture to just the outline and other features. When you have the lip in Paint, find the center and copy half of the lip. The half is top to bottom, not side to side. Paste the half back and reverse it. Join the original half and the reversed half. This will make both sides the same. Mark the places where you want holes or bends. Write the name of the lure that the lip will be used on, right on the lip. This comes in handy later when you have bags of lips, especially if the bag contains a mixture of different lips. Save the picture. Now copy the lip and paste it back. Arrange the lips so they are in a continuous 69 pattern across the page. Space them so they are one saw cerf apart plus a little wiggle room for sanding. This way, when you are cutting them out, you are actually cutting the sides of two lips at once. I use a scroll saw on Lexan. Print your page of lips out and glue it to the lip material. Cut them out, sand and drill. Leave the pattern glued to the material until you're ready to use the lip. By having a computerized sheet of lips, you can print out another page later and make the exact same lips again. You can also copy the lip or entire page and make changes for a different lip. Save the new design as a new filename. Hope this helps.
  2. Images of fish

    Try google's Image Search. Use words like "Fish ID" or the specific type of fish you're interested in. Once you start to find them, you'll probably find some with the Latin names. Use them to do another search and you should find some more. Some of the various state DNR websites have ID pictures, too. Ohio does, for one. Once you get some lures made with the photos, please remember to show us.
  3. Testing tank question

    There should be a small room in your house that has a device with an upper tank that contains clean water at all times. Just lift the lid and do a float/sink test. If you swim them in the lower unit, they'll swim in a circle for a while, then disappear.
  4. different materials

    How's this? Made from a disposable razor handle, plastic beak, plastic beads, stainless steel through wire and a lead barrel sinker inside the handle.
  5. Custom Lure Maker Wanted

    I might be able to help.
  6. New Bill Press

    I see. It sounds like a Wire EDM machine. A looong time ago, toolpaths were stored on a strip of paper tape with holes in it. Today, they use PCs, disks and all that "modern" stuff. Anyway, if you get a chance, would you see if they can make more?
  7. New Bill Press

    I'm guessing they used a CNC Machining Center to cut your die-set? If so, I would also assume that they saved the tool path. This means they could easily make more. If all that is true, maybe you could arrange to have some more made. I, for one, would get one.
  8. New Bill Press

    Good idea to contact the local Community College or Trade School. You could have little pointy pins inserted into the punch. It would lightly mark the places where you want to drill. Google up 'clicker die' to get some additional ideas.
  9. digital photos of jigs

    I'm not familiar with the software you use. If it has capabilties to edit pictures, there is probably a feature similar to MS Paint. BTW: If you are running Windows, you already have Paint. I spent just a few minutes and used Paint's Erase tool and simply changed the background to white. You can change it to any color you want. Use the Magnifier tool to get in close to what you want to keep. Help this helps.
  10. Why cedar?

    Cedar is preferred for several reasons: - Light weight and bouyant. - Easy to work with. - The grain is not too strong. - It is tougher than balsa. - Easy to get. - Inexpensive. - CCBCo used it. If you're making a bunch of lures, you should consider wearing a dustmask. After all, there must be a reason insects don't like it.
  11. Source For Custom Lead Head Mold??

    A Do-it mold is a good place to start. If you slip and make the cavity for the hook too large, you can make a repair with kid's modeling clay. Actually, the clay will help hold the hooks in place, too. The only critical place is where the hook cavity meets the jig cavity. So, your next question is: how do I get the modifications in the same location on each half of the mold? There's a couple ways. You could position the hook on one side and then slowly close the mold and give it a squeeze. I'd squeeze by hand or maybe give it a light tap. This should make a mark on each half. This way is a little trickier, but it works well. Using something like MicroSoft Paint, draw the cavity and hook. Copy the drawing and paste it back. Make the copy a mirror image of the first drawing. Line the copies up so they are directly opposite of each other. Print the drawing. Hold the paper up to a light and fold it in such a way that the pictures are right over each other. Cut away most of the extra paper. Use gluestick (which is a light glue) on the outside of the drawing. Lay it over one half of the mold and leave the creease sticking out. Gently close the mold and squeeze it together. Cut the crease away. Open the mold. Each half will have a paper stuck to it and the will be positioned correctly. Here's a rough drawing: Let 0 be the jig head. Let | be the crease. The drawing will look like this: 0 | 0 Hope this helps.
  12. Do you mark you lures?

    I use an ultra-fine Sharpie under the clear coat. Name and year.
  13. Help with through wire construction for newbie please

    You can get grommets at a fabric store. They should be with the needles, snaps and other things those folks call "Notions". You'll want a size the fits snuggly into the holes. In fact, you might want to round up the grommets first, then decide on the size of the holes. The inside diameter of the grommet should be such that the barrel swivel has a little room to move around. Show us some pictures of your progress, please.
  14. Lure Shape Standards

    As somewhat of a response to Lapala's Lure Shape Variations post, I submit for your approval my new Walleye-shaped Lure. Sorry, but there's something about fish-shaped lures that I find very appealing. The wooden body is about 5 1/2 " long and made from clear white pine. The front section is hollow and there's a couple BB's in the chamber. I coated the chamber with epoxy for water proofing and to make a harder surface for the BB's to strike. The beak is hand formed from 1/8" Lexan. It's somewhat of an art to get it hot enough to bend while avoiding having it bubble. Trying something new (for me), which is sharpening the leading edge of the beak. The eyes were made by drilling an eye socket with a brad point bit. Then painted with glow in the dark paint. The cavity is over-filled with epoxy. The hooks are size 1/0. The walleye paint pattern is applied with a brush and a "wet on wet" technique. The clear coat is epoxy.
  15. Spammers!

    Maybe spam-workers get the 4th of July holiday?