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clemmy

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About clemmy

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  • Birthday 04/24/2007

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  1. Hello, Just wondering if ProTec”s Orange glow powder paint actually glows orange? I know some products are colored but still glow green. Thanks, Craig
  2. Jeff is spot on. Think of it in terms of fine art. You can try to make a version of DaVinci’s Mona Lisa, but it would look horrible in comparison to a master. There is also so much you can do with finishes/technique in terms of basecoats, layering, foils, candies, textures, effects, fades, etc. And there is research on why you are painting in this pattern/manner. Have you researched vision, color transmission, strike triggers, various types of contrast? You need to know the depth a certain bait is used at, and what way it is fished and at what time of year. Even clearcoating can give you an edge in clarity, scratch resistance, impact resistance, etc. If you’ve put the years of practice, research, etc. in, I think it will show compared a fly by night person that thinks it’s easy. Craig
  3. Are you looking for color change paint or interference, as you mention both. Not sure what’s wrong with Createx or Golden? Many airbrush paints offer interference colors, including taxidermy airbrush paints, and even acrylic inks. For color change you could try the FolkArt craft paints, I’ve read here that folks like them thinned with a .5 airbrush tip. Another option would be buying the powder and adding to your clear. A limiting factor on any would be your airbrush tip size. Most would likely not work well with a .2 or .18 tip.
  4. Not tried a Spike it, but JJ’s Magic dyes silicone skirting well. It crinkles up at first, but then relaxes again as the dye dries. Craig
  5. Dave, Don’t forget it’s not just the COG, but the distribution. 20 grams at each end of a bait (or in whatever axis) would be a lot different than 40 grams near the COG. Craig
  6. It wouldn’t be too hard if you know someone that scubas. That’s essentially what M. Romanack did for the precision trolling/casting. Had divers with poles marked every foot and watched what level the bait went buy at. F. Prokop in Australia used a universities flume tank for his book, Don’t forget unless you are taking about trolling the castability of a bait will have a major effect on the running depth. Craig
  7. Dave, The original question was what would you do if a big company wanted 10k baits a month. Nice problem to have I guess, but the only option for most of us would be either: A) Outsource to someplace with cheap labor like China, Vietnam or in your case Indonesia. Your plan sounds like essentially you are outsourcing to yourself. Nice thing about that would be you would be there for quality control. B ) Sell your bait to an established company. I believe RAD lures actually did both with the Chatterbait. They got more orders than they could handle, so outsourced to Vietnam (GLC if I remember correctly), then eventually sold out to Z Man. Of course they had a patent which helped. The marketing, etc. issues are very real, as is distribution, etc. but the premise was you already have a 10k/Month order. Now if one were independently wealthy, or slowly built up the business, one might ramp up production and tooling. But this wouldn’t help with sudden large orders like if your bait won a major tournament. Craig
  8. Just an idea for dipping/sealing if your lures are that long, you might try a pasta jar off eBay. Many of them have airtight seals.
  9. The perfect topcoat is fish saliva..
  10. I don’t have as much experience with them as some on here, but most commonly Polytranspar and Lifetone are used I believe. McKensie Taxidermy carries them all. Be aware that they come in both lacquer and water-based versions.
  11. Auto Air makes a semi opaque cream. 4221 Otherwise for ready made I’d look at taxidermy paints for bone, or even bass belly white if you wanted a light cream. Createx Illustration has a bone in their bloodline series. Bob put you on the right track if you are going to mix it.
  12. I think there is room for everything. The idea of “custom” varies by individual, and there’s nothing intrinsically wrong with that. I think the difficulty comes when it marketed a a “custom bait” rather than a “custom painted” bait. I do think painters that copy should list the color as the color listed. For example, chartreuse with purple back should be “table rock shad” or “Hughsey TR Shad, or similar, not some random made up name. I think that would show a bit of respect or tip of the hat to the originator, even if you don’t know who it was). I don’t think there’s anything wrong with having a bait painted in a color not normally offered in that bait, like asking someone to paint a “Missouri Craw” on a Fat Rap. If you do it better, or cheaper than others, more power to you. If a fisherman has a belief that a custom paint job will catch him more fish, then it will. He’ll be expecting to get bit, pay better attention, use it more, etc. I personally believe that color can be important, but according to my research, fine detail doesn’t matter to most fish like bass on a moving bait, but depending on water clarity and color, light, depth and what the fish are keyed in on, color can matter. The exception would be slow moving baits like jerkbaits, suspending baits, etc. then they can get a longer look. To my mind, order of importance is depth>action>size>color. But I could well be wrong. My wife certainly tells me I am often enough, lol. out of curiosity Bassmaster, what kind of lure did you paint?
  13. Hello, I don’t post near as much as I used to, but am still here every couple days. I saw the new thread about the JR Hopkins DVD and I started thinking about the past of TU. I wonder if we shouldn’t have a “Lost and Found” sticky for formerly active members? More to let us know they’re okay, and just not into building, or having a difficult time, or whatever. Similarly, perhaps we should have a “In Memoriam” sticky. I know we unfortunately have had multiple threads in the past about Members who have passed, but they’re hard to find if you don’t know to look. Maybe each could have a link to the thread (if there was one), a link to their posts (as a way of honoring their contribution to the hobby) and a comments section. Craig
  14. I recently got a Grex Tritium TS. Well thought out and user friendly. Maybe just a hair under the quality of my Iwatas. What I’d love to try would be a nice Harder and Steenbeck. I would consider several things if considering putting money into a good airbrush: 1) Am I using it just for lures? If doing paintings or things like helmets, a higher end brush with a finer tip needle might be needed. 2) Do I paint lures freehand? If you mainly doing large portions of a lure, or mainly using stencils, then you’d be better off with something other than a Micron, irregardless of price. On the other hand, if you are hand spraying in the rays of the pectoral fins, a Micron might be perfect. 3) What kind of paint do I use? If you use Apple Barrel paint from Walmart, or even straight Createx, Something like a Micron would be frustrating. If you are using thinned Wicked or Illustration, or illustration inks, a Micron level would be great. It would also matter if you are doing production vs a single bait
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