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Kasilofchrisn

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Kasilofchrisn last won the day on November 3 2019

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About Kasilofchrisn

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    Kenai Peninsula Alaska

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  1. Nothing secretive about a parts supplier. It's definitely not like a fishing spot as the vendors always have more to sell. I have used Hagen's a few times with good results. That's another place to check. But you also need to define what bulk means to you? I buy components by the 100 count, 500 count, and rarely by the 1,000 count. Some companies like Hagen's have minimum order amounts or charge extra for smaller quantities. But if your looking to buy 5,000+ then Hagen's, Lakeland, Worth, and Rosco are your best bets. Of course if your buying in those quantities you'd want to be sure that your going to sell that many. Buying in bulk saves money but you can also get stuck with thousands of components you didn't sell. I sold things for a few years but then realized the off season was slow and in season I didn't have time to fish myself because I was making stuff for other fishermen. I either had to go bigger and start advertising, website etc. or give up the selling. I had the oportunity to get featured in a magazine through a friend who was a repeat customer and all that but decided not to. It wasn't so much fun anymore. So I gave it up and now only make for family and friends and I'm much happier for it. Of course this was all while working a job that actually paid the bills. Good luck!
  2. Boy seems like a lot of questions. Obviously your just strating out so that's expected. I really like Rosco split rings. I usually find them on eBay. Rosco has a minimum order of 5,000 and I usually only need 1,000 at a time. I use the #6xh on my saltwater jigs and they hold up to fish over 120# quite easily. But they have a wide range of sizes. You should also check out Barlow's tackle and Jann's Netcraft both have treated me well though I use Barlow's the most. There is also the Musky shop. Never used them but I know they carry musky specific components. Hook brands will depend on what hooks your mold calls for and/or what it will fit.
  3. My guess is the mold is made of graphite. Same stuff as pencil lead. If I'm correct then it would easily stand up to lead melting. A friend of mine has several small graphite molds he uses to pour melted gold into small ingots. His is an open pour style mold though. Not sure how graphite would hold up to repeated lead castings or how it would work as a two piece mold.
  4. Personally I prefer to cure my powder paint them just clear coat the eyes in the UV. I'm using Alumi UV currently which cures in roughly the same time as a toaster oven cure. But the UV takes longer to put on and I had to build a UV light box to do a bunch of jigs at once. So even more expense. Check the price on the UV stuff. Mine was a bit pricey so I prefer not to use it unnecessarily. Granted I make much larger jigs than most people. But it shouldn't be that hard to get a good cure on your jigs in the toaster oven. Just need to trouble shoot it a bit.
  5. I'm aware of that. But I really want to create my own from my own casting. Just a personal preference.
  6. You know that's not a bad way to go Mark. Have him make a full size tail mold and if testing isn't good modify it and test again. If needed I could then get him to make another smaller tail mold at that point.
  7. No I cannot. You see he has the bodies designed in a CAD program which is a scaled down version of a mold he already made and I already own. He was going to make the tails smaller in the OD as the jigs got smaller. But then was looking at the commercial versions realized most used the same sized OD tail. But either way he has to make a new mold with which to inject the plastic tails that will fit the smaller jig bodies. So there is no prototype. If I have him ship the mold without the tails so that I could test different ones then it will likely take a few extra months to get all of this complete. I was hoping to be making jigs out of this to use for this icefishing season.
  8. So I'm having a mold maker make me a jigging rapala style mold like the other one he made (yes the one I posted about here)but in smaller sizes. The good news he is almost done with it. But he has some questions in regards to the tail size. He is machining a mold so he can inject the hard plastic tails. His original plan was to downsize the tails as he downsized the jig. But he noticed commercial versions all had similar sized tails(OD). So what's your opinion on this? Downsize the tail as you downsize the jig or keep the tails the same size even if the jig gets smaller? I wish we had a 3D printer to try different samples but I don't think it's in the cards on this project. Thanks, Chris
  9. Yes contact Bob Lalonde at http://www.cncmolds.com/webstore/ Or Shawn Collins at http://shawncollinscustoms.net/ There's a few others out there as well but I'd try those two first.
  10. Tin is a very hard metal compared to lead. I'm not convinced a split shot made of tin will be abel to be opened and closed properly. I know when I was making pinch on sinkers last summer I had to use pure lead or I couldn't close them by hand and I worried the ears would break off. Pure lead sure fixed that issue. I'm also confused as to why your finished jigs need to survive 400*f for an hour? You can cure powder paint at lower temps then that if need be. And I usually cure at 20 -25 minutes.
  11. If you already have the Bismuth then that should work. The problem with Bismuth is it expands slightly as it cools so you will need to use drop out and unmolding might give you some issues depending on the mold used. If you have a choice I would use Tin or Antimony instead as they're easier to work with.
  12. I've used pure tin on various jigs one ounce and up and it works great. But it is $20 per pound. So I prefer to use scrap pewter. Most pewter is 96% tin and cast just as easily as pure tin. Often you can find some pewter at a thrift store or garage sale for a decent price. I don't know where you get the idea that PURE tin will crumble. It casts just fine for me and is not the least bit crumbly or like sand. It is also ~30% lighter than lead. I buy pure tin at Rotometals. I make my lead harder by using superhard from Rotometals. It is a 70/30 Lead/Antimony alloy. Since the Antimony is already alloyed with the lead it is much easier to use. Pure Antimony melts at over 1,000*f but superhard melts at normal lead temps.
  13. You can get the pins from Cadman. Get ahold of him here or on his website. http://cadmansjigs.weebly.com/
  14. This mold can be purchased on eBay if you use the search feature look up "jigging minnow mold". If anybody is interested this mold makers name is Kent Desautel. It's contact information is: Kentdesautel@gmail.com Phone: (701)520-1872 I know some people are not happy with Sean Collins being hard to get ahold of. Though personally I really like Sean's molds and own over 20 of them. I know Bob at CNC mold and stuff does very good work and I have a couple of his molds. This just gives another option for those who may be looking for someone to make them an aluminum mold.
  15. Had a bit of trouble getting the pictures uploaded but I think I got it figured out. The fin is just resting there for looks I have not glued it on yet. I won't do that till after it is painted.
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