JimP

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JimP last won the day on August 22 2014

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About JimP

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  • Location
    Northern West Virginia
  • Interests
    Fishing, woodworking, and out door stuff in general. I have been making lures since I was a kid, started off tying flies.

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  1. Misting paint on belly of lures?

    Mark: A top coat will be required if you want the paint (actually an ink) to be durable. The ink is alcohol based and most colors are transparent. Some folks have a problem with colors running under the clear. As long as you can apply a fast dry (non-alcohol based) intermediate layer you can use almost anything as a top coat. I should also add this does not replace a regular airbrush since its is not capable of the level of detail of a good airbrush. For tinting and adding scales it works well and is very inexpensive, the pens seem expensive but last a long time and are refillable. As with anything new to your system experiment before using on the final step of a labor intensive lure.
  2. Misting paint on belly of lures?

    Copic air brush is exactly what you need. I use a Copic brush on fly rod poppers to tint just like you are doing except in a smaller way. Increase the distance between the brush and lure to give a soft blush. Don't mess with the small cans of propellant. You can rig it to run on any compressed air system you have.
  3. Hard to find hair?

    Synthetics works great. I have almost fully switched to synthetic materials for flies and fly rod poppers. The colors are vivid and much more durable than natural hair. I have lots of poppers that have some age to them, some have had birthdays, and look as good as new. The natural materials look ragged after a year, even less if put away wet a time or two. You might have a bit of a learning curve trying to figure the different textures as they relate back to the materials you are used to tying. The synthetics can be tied in combination, along with naturals with good results. Bucktail is the one of the common tying materials that has not been duplicated by modern materials. At least one company has made synthetic "BuckTail" and tested by a few tiers with mixed results. I have no experience with the synthetic bucktail however.
  4. Hard to find hair?

    Not as a US resident, if you lived in Canada no problem.
  5. Tying hackle on a Rooster tail shaft?

    Should be very easy to tie directly onto the wire shaft. I have made several "Rostertail" type spinners without any problem. Attache the loop the holds the hook into the vice and go to town. Much easier to tie the wire shaft than the hook. No sharp points to deal with. The logic behind tying the shaft instead of the hook is the hook points are near the tip of the tied in hackle instead of being half way up and inside the hackle collar resulting in fewer missed strikes. Worn and tattered hackle can easily be replaced on the wire shaft at anytime. The only part that is different is the whip finish when done. You could just use a couple of half hitches and follow up with a good head cement. UV cure is great, one coat and done. You could also get some thin poly tubing that's used to tie 'Tube flies". Pre-tie onto about 1/4" sections and slide over the wire.
  6. skirt tool

    Here is a version of the devise you mention that I made a few years ago. This is made with oak plywood and worked well. The original wooden pin holders were replace with PCV board version which were slicker worked better. Also this one is slightly larger than the purchased one. Even being made on a CNC machine it is too much effort to turn out for what they were asking. I know they no longer make them. Just letting you know you can make one.
  7. Cedar cranks

    Wow, very nice. That would be sharp over foil. Just a hint of color depending on direction.
  8. PID controller help

    By all means test with any liquid. Ideally something as close to the normal material as possible in density and thermal conductivity. But do a test, lets say using water, record the results and adjust settings and repeat test. Better response or worse? Also place the temperature sensing probe near the heat source so the probe has minimum time lag. If you could agitate the liquid during heating would also be helpful.
  9. PID controller help

    Temperatures are some the hardest loops to tune because to the time lag. You apply a heat source and some time later depending up on the capacity of the vessel, relation of the temp probe to the heat source, insulation, and and the amount of energy applied as heat. Is would be normal for the indicated temperature to cycle above and below set point and your tuning is to flatten the cycles as much as possible. If you can "AutoTune" with derivative turned off I'd try that. Derivative might be taking you out in anticipation of reaching set point and is probably not needed in a small vessel. Otherwise since you have already completed an auto tune simply turn it off and test run again. Make yourself some detailed notes and record you settings along with response time and the amount of overshoot. Only change one setting at a time, and keep notes. No one can give you a valid number. Way too many options. You will probably see a different response with low level in the pot compared to a full pot. So it might be helpful to try and maintain a somewhat constant level in the pot and expect to see the loop to cycle again if you add a large amount of plastic at on time. I have several years of industrial instrumentation experience but have been away from hands on for a while. Good luck!
  10. Questions about Epoxy

    I mix by weight also. No measuring tools to cleanup, just pour directly from the bottle into the mixing cup. If you read the labels I bet there will be a ratio for mixing. The epoxy I'm using right now is "System Three" and the ratio listed is 1 unit of resin to .44 units of hardener. Just pour about 2/3s the amount of resin you think you will need into the mixing cup that has been tared on the scale. Take the weight and multiply by the ratio .44 (in my case yours might be different). Your number does not have to be exact, while the posted ratio in the goal its better to under shoot the hardener than to over shoot. Yup, grossly too much hardener will make the surface tacky.
  11. ANYONE USE COPIC SRAY MARKERS

    jonister: I have had success with Copic markers not running by top coating with- Company:CSI Coatings Product: "Seal Coat" Quick dry, water clean up, you will need to apply and turn until dry.
  12. ANYONE USE COPIC SRAY MARKERS

    Ranger: Here is a fly rod popper that was finished with a Copic. Copic/copic markers are used for about 50% of my finish work. Most base coating is done with an airbrush. The airbrush is also used for fine detail when needed. The Copic is mostly used for coarse detail and spot work. It is a handy tool, and zero cleanup. I like that.
  13. Inline Spinnerbait???

    Thanks Bassinman: The drawing conveys your idea very clearly. Thanks, Jim P
  14. Inline Spinnerbait???

    Sounds like a great idea. If I understand correctly you end up with 3 blades on the spinner? One at the head and two on the arm? If I'm incorrect how about a drawing.
  15. Bandit Khaki color?

    Use this web site to play with mixing colors. It was shared just a few days ago on this website I think. This tool needs the 6 digit HEX value in this case #e8cf7c. You can also just click and play. http://trycolors.com/colors/e8cf7c/ It is set up to take you to the color that is close to the one that you are looking for. As a starting point try 5 parts yellow, 1 part Magenta, 1 part blue, 4 parts white. You can get small apps for any operating system and phones that allow you to move a cursor around your screen and measure the color under the cursor. Most tools will give you the RGB (red,green,blue) value of the color that is displayed on the screen. This next tool will convert RGB TO HEX, the HEX value is used with the link above to get the mix formula. http://www.rapidtables.com/web/color/RGB_Color.htm Keep in mind the color displayed on screen might be very different than intended color because of any miss adjusted equipment in the long path from source to your screen. Have fun!