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Found 21 results

  1. DiyEngineer

    Has anyone tried making bamboo baits?

    Has anyone tried glued Bamboo wood for making Baits. I have applied standard wood bait principles (it was a topwater, lip less crank bait type), first I made my own rattle, then hollowed the inside fitted a wire frame for the hook and line connection then adding the rattle to the front of the bait for weight and wobbles. But after gluing and sealing it (I did not paint it), it kicked back and forth a little, with a kind of weak rattle. I don't what went wrong but I am guessing the 30 lb test was slightly stiff for it, how I came to this conclusion is that when I put thread (for sewing) it kicked a lot better. If anyone can give advice, I would appreciate it. Thanks in advance.
  2. Chuck Young

    Wood Densities

    here is a table of wood densities compiled from several sources. Solid Density (103 kg/m3) (lb/ft3)*) Balsa 0.09 6 6 Balsa 0.16 10 10 Balsa 0.22 14 14 Paulownia 0.29 18 18 Balsa 0.3 19 19 Bamboo 0.3 - 0.4 19 - 25 19 Basswood 0.3 - 0.6 20 - 37 20 Pine, white 0.35 - 0.5 22 - 31 22 Poplar 0.35 - 0.5 22 - 31 22 Cedar, western red 0.38 23 23 Pine, yellow 0.42 23 - 37 23 Butternut 0.38 24 24 Obeche 0.39 24 24 Sycamore 0.4 - 0.6 24 - 37 24 Willow 0.4 - 0.6 24 - 37 24 Cottonwood 0.41 25 25 Spruce 0.4 - 0.7 25 - 44 25 Alder 0.4 - 0.7 26 - 42 26 Aspen 0.42 26 26 Gaboon 0.43 27 27 Spruce, Norway 0.43 27 27 Redwood, American 0.45 28 28 Spruce, Canadian 0.45 28 28 Spruce, Sitka 0.45 28 28 Spruce, western white 0.45 28 28 Chestnut, sweet 0.56 30 30 Pine, radiata 0.48 30 30 Walnut, Claro 0.49 30 30 Whitewood, European 0.47 30 30 Hemlock, western 0.5 31 31 Larch 0.5 - 0.55 31 - 35 31 Mahogany, African 0.5 - 0.85 31 - 53 31 Agba 0.51 32 32 Beech 0.7 - 0.9 32 - 56 32 Cypress 0.51 32 32 Pine, Corsican 0.51 32 32 Pine, Scots 0.51 32 32 Redwood, European 0.51 32 32 Ash, black 0.54 33 33 Douglas Fir 0.53 33 33 Oregon Pine 0.53 33 33 Elm, English 0.55 - 0.6 34 - 37 34 Elm, American 0.57 35 35 Elm, Dutch 0.56 35 35 Gum, Red 0.54 35 35 Juniper 0.55 35 35 Lime, European 0.56 35 35 Magnolia 0.57 35 35 Parana Pine 0.56 35 35 Walnut, European 0.57 35 35 Cedar of Lebanon 0.58 36 36 Gum, Black 0.59 36 36 Philippine Red Luan 0.59 36 36 Hickory 0.83 37 - 58 37 Oak 0.6 - 0.9 37 - 56 37 Hackberry 0.62 38 38 Maple 0.6 - 0.75 39 - 47 38 Pear 0.6 - 0.7 38 - 45 38 Walnut, Amer Black 0.63 38 38 Tanguile 0.64 39 39 Mahogany, Cuban 0.66 40 40 Myrtle 0.66 40 40 Plane, European 0.64 40 40 Sapele 0.64 40 40 Walnut 0.65 - 0.7 40 - 43 40 Apple 0.65 - 0.85 41 - 52 41 Ash, white 0.65 - 0.85 40 - 53 41 Iroko 0.66 41 41 Locust 0.65 - 0.7 42 - 44 41 Mahogany, Honduras 0.65 41 41 Plum 0.65 - 0.8 41 - 49 41 Ramin 0.67 41 41 Teak, Indian 0.65 - 0.9 41 - 55 41 Utile 0.66 41 41 Birch, British 0.67 42 42 Birch, European 0.67 42 42 Yew 0.67 42 42 Cherry, European 0.63 43- 56 43 Elm, Wych 0.69 43 43 Afrormosia 0.71 44 44 Ash, European 0.71 44 44 Meranti, dark red 0.71 44 44 Madrone 0.74 45 45 Oak, American Red 0.74 45 45 Oak, English Brown 0.74 45 45 Teak, Burma 0.74 45 45 Keruing 0.74 46 46 Dogwood 0.75 47 47 Holly 0.75 47 47 Oak, American White 0.77 47 47 Pecan 0.77 47 47 Zebrawood 0.79 48 48 Elm, Rock 0.82 50 50 Gum, Blue 0.82 50 50 Rosewood, Bolivian 0.82 50 50 Pine, pitch 0.67 52 - 53 52 Mahogany, Spanish 0.85 53 53 Persimmon 0.9 55 55 Rosewood, East Indian 0.9 55 55 Logwood 0.9 57 57 Box 0.95 - 1.2 59 - 72 59 Satinwood 0.95 59 59 Teak, African 0.98 61 61 Water gum 1 62 62 Greenheart 1.04 64 64 Ebony 1.1 - 1.3 69 - 83 69 Lignum Vitae 1.17 - 1.33 73 - 83 73
  3. Hi Guys, I recently finished of my first stickbait project. It was aimed at making a wire-through stickbait for GT, Tuna etc. It turned out well and I did make a video, but I am looking for some information about creating a mold for this particular lure so that I can replicate it with with some two component plastic mix or something along those lines. Please let me know your thoughts. Any information about mold making is welcome since I have ZERO experience with it. I'm also looking for an affordable two component plastic mix that floats when dry. Here's a video of the Stickbait so you can get an idea of the size in case that is a determining factor. Thanks!
  4. Backlash85

    Bondo Baits

    As I sit and glance at my almost now 18 hours of crafting - I stare at slight imperfections in pure dismay wondering what I could use to fix my small imperfections. Bondo is the first thing that came to mind with clay coming in slightly after.. Has anyone ever had any experience with using bondo on their hard baits for covering up imperfections of symmetry.
  5. Anthony Vanderbeek

    Wood Carving

    I am trying to get into carving my hard body lures from wood by hand. I was wondering what tools any of you would recommend as a must have for that job. So far i have been using a sharp knife and a dremel engraver for fine detail. It works but I want to know how to make things more productive with better tools.
  6. Ultimate Predators

    Symmetry When Making Crankbaits/lures

    When making crankbaits "by Hand", out of Balsa wood, other woods or Resins, what tools and methods does one use to keep symmetry within a crankbait body ? I see a lot of discussions about maintaining a center line and eye balling the symmetry but I am wondering if there are more accurate ways.
  7. Gab_Mercier

    IMG 4023

    Handmade wooden fishing lure! www.mercierlures.ca
  8. smilinjoe

    USA Joe

    My finishing process intentionally raises the grain of the wood to enhance the look of the lure. The USA Joe is a top water bait and was inspired by my love of this great country I live in. Thanks! Smilin Joe
  9. ColonelMel

    Walnut Crankbait

    This lure was turned on the wood lathe. The stripe down the side is inlaid maple. The spot is inlaid cedar. Hooks, hardward and bill are all brass. Eyes are brass brads with painted spot. 5" long.
  10. Tfeuts

    Ratio Of Segment Size

    Hello to everybody out there! hope the winter has treated everybody well, I know I am ready to get some lines wet up here in the Northeast. New to TU and the lure making world so here is my question, I started making a lure to mimic my favorite saltwater bait and I decided I wanted to turn it into a multi-jointed swimbait, is there a "rule" or ratio I should follow when making the different segments? I want to make sure it has the proper "S" swimming action and figured the size of each segment would make a difference. Tried doing a few searches but came up with nothing so if i missed it some direction would be appreciated! Thank you for any info you can provide! Tight lines
  11. Learn the process of creating a hand carved wood fishing lure. Watch me carve one of my poppers, from start to finish. You will get to see the process of how a wooden surface lure is carved, weighted and hardware added. Everything has been captures up to the point of the lure being ready for painting. This video was shot in one day, starting in the afternoon, and finishing up late at night. I apologize for some of the lighting at the end of the video. This is part one of a two part series. The final sealing of the wood, painting and clear coating of the lure will be covered in part two. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERFtkybduDQ
  12. jettsonlures

    School Of Fish

    Here are a few of the surface lures I created. These are 3 3/4" poppers that weigh approximately 1/2 ounce. These don't have hooks yet.

    © Jettson Lure Company, LLC.

  13. DuckButter

    CAM02775

    4" Baby Bass topwater. I attempted the pot belly look lol...

    © DuckButter

  14. DuckButter

    Baby Bass Topwater

    4" wood topwater, baby basswood
  15. jettsonlures

    Waiting On The Dock

    Here is the lure sitting on a dock. I am just about to attach some hooks to it and give a test drive.

    © Jettson Lure Company, LLC.

  16. jettsonlures

    Lures Freshly Painted

    Here are 5 of the poppers I carved. These are 3 3/4" poppers that weigh approximately 1/2 ounce. These are freshly painted and awaiting their top coat.

    © Jettson Lure Company, LLC.

  17. jettsonlures

    Carved And Ready

    Here are some poppers that are ready to be sealed.

    © Jettson Lure Company, LLC.

  18. Uncle Jays Fishin Shack

    foil bait with hvac tape

    I used HVAC tape for this one
  19. Uncle Jays Fishin Shack

    Alternative To Foiling A Bait

    I tried using HVAC tape instead of foil and it works well. It is very sticky and easily manipulated into shape and very forging around curves. It also holds a scale pattern nicely. I bought a roll of 100ft x 4" for 12 bucks at the supply house my company uses. I urge anyone to try it.
  20. kajay920

    Hinged Craw

    Here's what it looks like after it settles to the bottom.
  21. Last Cast

    First Lure!

    Alright, so I gave myself a challenge about a month ago to hand carve a lure from a block of wood and catch a fish on it. I initially wanted to accomplish my goal and move on to the next challenge, whatever it may be, but after finding this site and seeing just how much knowledge is available, I think I have found a new hobby in conjunction with fishing. First of all let me just say THANK YOU to all of you guys who share your experience on here. I wouldn't have known where to begin without all of the tips. As for the lure: I decided to go with a top-water popper to give a little extra excitement to the payoff if, and when, it happens. I went online to Jannsnetcraft and ordered some basswood blocks, screw eyes, split rings, and treble hooks for around $16 (including shipping). I used a store-bought lure to trace out my body design and transferred that to the block of basswood. Then, I went the old-school method of using a trusty ol' pocket knife to carve out my body and sanded it down. After reading through a few posts, I decided to use super-glue to seal the wood and this worked just fine. Here is a pre-sealing pic. Then, came the real work...... the painting. I didn't have an airbrush available so I decided to use some Testors model paint that was lying around. This worked ok, although it was pretty messy and I haven't read too many good things about using it on this forum. The painting process itself was pretty cool/challenging and I really can't believe some of the work that is on this forum. You guys are friggin amazing. I printed out a stencil to add a little detail to the sides and went with a basic frog color scheme. My detail technique needs a little work. lol. One regret I have is my crappy topcoat that I used. I got a little too antsy (typical rookie mistake) and just bought Krylex Outdoor Clear Coat spray (try not to laugh too hard). It gave the lure a decent glossy finish, but I can tell it will not be durable and probably not anywhere close to waterproof. I am going to need to put a better topcoat on the lure before putting her into action so my question is this: Can I put a 'good' topcoat on top of my crappy topcoat or do I need to try to sand it off and risk ruining my 'masterpiece' paint job. I know D2T or E-tex is preferred by most on here, but I saw another member suggest using Hard As Nails Clear also. My goal for this lure is to catch a fish and throw it in a display box in my office as a bit of a trophy. Any suggestions are very much appreciated and thanks again for all of the shared knowledge. Josh