dramone

Lip pouring ?

26 posts in this topic

Dear TU members

what a great resource of info's and help!! :worship:

pls excuse my poor english...

making lips for baits for me is a pain :censored:

i'm using makrolon from BASF (is the same like lexan from GE, Calibre from Dow Chemical) for the lips so far.

what do you think, is it possible to pour lips from i.e. epoxy (devcon),

Polyester or a similar transparent material? or do you tried to melt lexan for pouring the lips (melting temp. 220-230 °C)? my thougt is, to find a "short cut" for sawing etc. the lips...

your help is much appreciated!

Greetings from the swiss alps

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I've never heard of melting and pouring Lexan into a mold and I wonder if some of its desirable physical properties might be changed by that? If you make small batches, I think cutting/sanding is best. For large production, a hydraulic press and custom dies are often used to stamp out the lips. For small batch work, I rough cut the lip outline with a pair of tin snips (aka aircraft metal snips) and then sand down to the exact lip line with a Dremel fine grit sanding cylinder. You can do a set of 6 lips in 30 minutes. It's reliable, exact, and fairly quick. Not lightning fast but you can change lip shapes easily, which I consider essential. It will be interesting to see if anyone melts/pours Lexan!

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I take old cd's, cut them up with side cutters, sand the rough edges and epoxy on. works great every time.

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Welcome Dramone.

We are all interested in your idea about the moulding of lexan. You have obviously done some research into the idea, as you already know the melting point.

I think you should go ahead and try it and let us all know what you learn. Good luck with it as I don't recall anyone trying this before.

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many thanks for the infos and hints!

so far, i bent the lips using a "heatgun", but i never meltet Polycarbonate with purpose....

btw: makrolon aka lexan should not burn below 500°C

let's see if i can find the time during the weekend to give it a try...

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I have messed with it but honestly cutting them is hands down easier. I messed around with thermal methods and solvent based ones. If you want true ease some guys use presses and dies to cut lips.

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I think you'd have to invest way too much time in becoming able to pour lips. If you're going to use Devcon, you are going to have to wait a day before you can handle them. If you just cut outt he lexan, it takes 5 minutes each lip. Takes some practice ( I can't get a lip even for my life), but I think pouring them is going to take longer than cutting them.

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i used to know guys at a custom acrylic fabrication shop that would do all sorts of crazy projects. bending acrylic with heaters was and is a fairly standard production scene. they left the heaters on on a large piece and left it on to get a head start or something. that night the entire building blew up from gasses that were released. on the same note there are many cell cast acrylic products but it probably takes very expensive tooling to do . im not sure though.

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If I'm not mistaken I noticed a product I believe to be a liquid plastic advertised in Taxidermy magazines that you can make water effects with that is supposed to be very resilient. It is to be able to hold up very well. With as much abuse as our baits are put through I'm not sure if it would. I thought of trying it but just have'nt ever put the effort into it. I guess its worth a little bit of research.

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Dramone-I posted thie about a week ago but it appears the pic was too big. Hope it is of some help. Pete

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Thanks guys, thought it was up there a week or more ago. I am looking for something to pad the ‘turntable’ to stop slipping; I was thinking a thin film of silicone - Any Ideas???? If the blank slips you may get flat spots, although, when the first edge burrs (after sanding), it tends to hold it snug most times.

If you get everything right it only takes 10-15 seconds to sand one. The further you move the turntable from the disc the wider and longer the lip will be and perfectly symmetrical (well nearly). pete

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If you could pre-drill the line tie holes. you could then pin the lip down. If the back edge of the lip is square and fits well into the fixture, it shouldn't slip. The holes drilled at the rear of the lip for epoxy might work also to secure the lip in the fixture.

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I saw the post originally, I sent you a PM.

How about double sided tape. I think the silicone rubber is about the best idea though.

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Thanks, Kc / Dave. If the back bearing surface was bigger, as you say Kc it should not slip, but it is only 10mm across and the front is 20mm. I like the idea of the holes though, that would make it very positive

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You obviously will have a separate drill template for accurately drilling the holes in the lip blanks.

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THX for all the help!! (@hazmail:nice idea!!)

i just had a phonecall with "my" plastic supplier...he has a "new" product in stock "Orthophtalacid-Polyesterresin". rock hard, "cristal" clear, UV and water resitant... he suggested to try this material for the lips (pouring) instead of some "special epoxy-resin" due to the tiny diameter of the lips...(it's also used for aircraft etc.)

what do you think? any experiences? worth a try?

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I googled the orthopolywotsit. I could not find any strength figures. It stated that after curing, it has to be heated in an oven for six hours in order to reach full strength.

If you can get a sample to try out, it has to be worth a trial. You then need to figure out a way of comparing with the other lip materials, or am I getting too involved again. All those members with shares in Lexan will want proof that it is at least as good.

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here are the figures:

Lexan

Refractive index 1.586

Density 1.2

Orthophtalacid-Polyesterresin (cobalt accelerated)

aka ISOPHTHALIC POLYESTER RESIN

Refractive index 1,54

Density 1,12

the material must not be tempered or heated to gain full strenght as far as i've been told...

@vodkaman: i'll give it a try (impact strength seems to be a big issue, can be "adjusted"), and if i'm sattisfied, i will send you some samples (to liverpool, if alright with you) to have a substantiated second oppinion.

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Dramone- 'Orthophtalacid-Polyesterresin', sounds interesting, keep us posted on the tests, it's amazing what is out there in the aero/space industries that we do not hear anything about until 5 years after!!Polyesters have not rated too well with a lot of other marine / water uses , so it will be interesting to see a result. pete

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