SwimbaitJoe

Wakebait material

5 posts in this topic

I was wondering if anybody could reccomend a nice dense wood, that will be reasonably heavy while giving off a loud clack when the joints hit together.

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I'm not so sure that the material will make much diference to the 'clack' as it will have a paint finish (epoxy etc). But it does open up a few ideas. A couple of small steel balls with a drilled out hollow chambers behind them, aligned to contact, might give an interesting result.

It may be simpler and tidier to install a purpose built rattle to achieve the same. I do think that sound is important as it travels something like ten times more efficienlty through water.

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All of the hard woods will give off a louder sound than a soft wood. I find cedar has a much louder sound than balsa and poplar is louder than the cedar. The joints banging together will be much louder than a installed rattle.

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I've used balsa, paulownia and basswood. I think paulownia or basswood is better and both clack louder than balsa. You do run into a durability problem with body segments whacking each other repeatedly. I usually put extra epoxy at the touch points but that's a temporary fix at best. I haven't come up with a reasonable fix (i.e., one that doesn't add lots of weight or work) and maybe you just have to accept that and touch up the segments occasionally.

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Poplar makes a pretty good clack, but that ball bearing idea is very interesting. It would really cut down on joint fatigue and make a unique noise. Great Idea!!

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