Yake Bait

Thru-wire Topwater

10 posts in this topic

A buddy of mine has access to a lathe this winter. Together we are thinking about making some topwater lures during the off season. Wondering what methods are used to bore the center hole out on a topwater lure for the wire to go through. I know that it needs to be dead center and on axis of plug as it is turned on the lathe, but that is about all I know about it...

Thanks,

Pete

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It makes sense to drill the hole prior to machining as the hole will be used for the rear mounting spike (cant remember what it's called). I'm sure that was your plan anyway.

The problem drilling a lengthy hole with a small diameter drill is that the drill bit is flexible. It will tend to follow the path of least resistance and follow the grain. If your stock material is straight grained then the problem will be minimised.

The second problem is finding a drill bit long enough. I have seen drill bits braised together, but none were small diameters.

I would be inclined to cut the hanger slot with a dremel in two halves and glue them together before machining. But I am not a machinist or lathe operator, I hope that lure constructors with experience will jump in here with some real advice for you.

I've only jumped in here because the thread was in danger of slipping way and I thought it was a good question, requiring an answer.

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why don't u cut a channel on the bottom of the lure, insert the wire and fill it ? u can add some lead too for castability

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Where is Husky when you need him. (I think most of his are foam but I am sure he knows how the guys from the Northeast do it)

There is a way the the striper plug builders make them. I will try and find out for you.

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Here are some of the ways to do it but you will need to do some reading. This should be more info than you could find in the best book you could buy.

http://www.stripersonline.com/surftalk/showthread.php?t=449514

http://www.stripersonline.com/surftalk/showthread.php?t=450132

http://www.stripersonline.com/ubb547/Forum11/HTML/001377.html

I think there are about 3 to 5 ways it can be done in these post. I didn't read all of it this time. Good luck with them.

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I make striped bass plugs. I use a six inch, 5/32" brad point - hit the plug from the rear to the belly hole (for longer plugs I follow through with a 12" bit and a hand drill).

Most of my plugs require offset for the front (mid slot lips). I use a 1/8" brad point to reach the first belly hole from my mark for the lip slot.

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Typically, the bait (cylinder) is mounted in a chuck on the headstock side of the lathe. A drill bit gets mounted in the tail stock end. The bit remains stationary while the head stock spins. The bit is then moved into the cylinder a little at a time until the desired depth is reached. Might be a bit off, but that's pretty close.

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Typically, the bait (cylinder) is mounted in a chuck on the headstock side of the lathe. A drill bit gets mounted in the tail stock end. The bit remains stationary while the head stock spins. The bit is then moved into the cylinder a little at a time until the desired depth is reached. Might be a bit off, but that's pretty close.

Bingo.

Since you'll be using lathe, use this method. You can drill the hole before or after profiling the lure. Goes lickity-split, you shouldn't have any problems.

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