pikeman

Propionate topcoat

8 posts in this topic

In trouble again :( trying to use propionate pellets instead of devcon2ton as topcoat cause I find dipping more suitable then brushing. The problem is that don't know how to dissolve the propionate...using thinner or acetone ( I use acrylic paint and it tends to wash away or mix when I dip the lure into prop+thinner mix - probably I'll use some acrylic lacquer to protect the paint ). Another ( and most disturbing ) problem is whitening after curing ( I read that it's all about moisture ) ... how can I get read of it (alcohol / what kind ? / does it affect the polish? ) ? :) should I use some heat sources ( like hairdryer ) to fast cure the propionate topcoat and get rid of the moisture ?

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To dissolve:

approximately 1 oz. of pellets in a 16 oz. jar and fill with 11 oz. of acetone. Stir with a piece of metal rod of stiff wire. It should dissolve in 1-3 days if you agitate it from time to time and recap.

I will also keep a jar of super thick Propionate around to refill the dipping jar as needed. To make this I will add 3 oz. of pellets with 6+ oz. of acetone and stir. This takes about 1 week to dissolve but the shelf life is forever if you keep it sealed. Just add a ounce of this with approx. 3 oz. of acetone when the dipping jar starts to get low.

Whitening:

I think this is caused by moisture in the air and collecting on the surface of the lure as the propionate dries. When the acetone evaporates it cools the surface of the lure and moisture will condense on the lure causing the problem. The blushing (whitening) is only on the surface of the bait and can be resolved after the acetone has fully evaporated. Just dip the corner of a clean cotton rag in acetone and quickly polish the bait. This will get rid of the blushing. You can also use a cotton buffing wheel at high speed in a Dremel and this will polish the surface also. If you dip in low humidity or cooler conditions your bait will dry with the clearest topcoat you have ever seen.

The best way I have found to keep paints from running when using as a topcoat is to use an airbrush and spray a thin layer of propionate with acetone (15 or 20 to 1 mix) on the surface of the lure. Shoot 2 or 3 coats and then you can start doing quick topcoat dips in about 5 minutes.

I also found a can of House of Kolor Clearcoat that I could spray on prior to topcoating and that kept the paint from running. I had to let that dry for about 1 hour before I could dip it into the Propionate.

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THX Palmetto for the useful information , my problem is over here :

If you dip in low humidity or cooler conditions your bait will dry with the clearest topcoat you have ever seen.

how can I obtain low humidity mixed with cooler conditions , low humidity means dry air so this is "hot" but hot ain't good cause it will cause condense mixed with the cool air from evaporating acetone...on the other side cooler conditions can mean high humidity :flame: did u found a solution for this? or u just clear the white spots using acetone?

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An air conditioner and a dehumidifier?

sounds good but not cheap :) don't know if it worths the effort to spend the day trying to create the proper conditions , I was thinking at gas cooker or hairdryer , ventilators, drying wheels , things like that :lol:

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I'll admit, an air conditioner isn't cheap, but at least around here dehumidifiers aren't that expensive, and I like them because it helps you get sick less often (bacteria don't survive as long in dry environments). I was being kind of a smart a** as well. :wink:

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