Yake Bait

Bending 0.062" Wire Loops

14 posts in this topic

I did a search but found limited info on bending loops in 0.062" wire. The forming tools do not work beyond 0.051". Did find a thread that referenced using round nose pliers and vice grips. Would be interested in more info on "how to"

Thanks,

Pete

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Pete, It depends on how complicated you are going to get, and how many you are going to make. The quickest way is to try the round nose pliers. I don't know if they will work on that gage wire. I assume you are talking about stainless steel wire? Next best bet would be using nails in a piece of wood, but after awhile, I would assume the nails would bend and or loosen. The final solution is what we do at work. Keep in mind that this will outlast you and me both if done right. Get yourself some 1/4" thick alum. plate. Whatever size you need to lay out the whole wire bending pattern. Next get yourself some hardened dowels (find the diameter you need). Drill holes in the alum. plate slightly smaller then the dowels. Locate the holes where you need them. Next take the dowel pins and press them in the alum. plate. If done correctly, they will never move, or pull out. PM me if you need more help

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Thanks Cadman. You are correct that I am looking at stainless wire. For starters, I am looking towards making some bucktails and topwater baits this winter so this is just a straight wire with loops on either end. I've got some 0.040" wire and can do this relatively easily but haven't worked with 0.062" yet.

Not looking to mass produce anything, just want to tinker by hand.

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Here is the way I do a twisted loop with heavy wire. I have pictures, but they are large. If the explanation doesn't work for you and you want pics let me know and I can forward via email.

Ok, here is how I do the tail loop on my plugs. What is pictured here is intended to be a snug tight fit to the plug. The wire should be tight when completed. If you do a spinner blade, propeller, or spinning wood body, you will have to leave some extra space, but the principal is still the same, you just have to leave room for the spinning pieces to spin. This method can also be used to the head loops on the bucktails. Some tackle companies make a wire bending tool to do the head loops, but the ones I have seen are good up to .035 or .041 wire. I think you use .051, and I typically use .062, so those tools won

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I did a search but found limited info on bending loops in 0.062" wire. The forming tools do not work beyond 0.051". Did find a thread that referenced using round nose pliers and vice grips. Would be interested in more info on "how to"

Thanks,

Pete

Just out of curiosity, why do you need to use 1/16" wire.

I've been using .045" and I have to say, if any fish causes that to fail, I don't want to get close to that fish! :-)

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some guys need durability fishing toothy critters called mooskies. they have a way to bend and bust equipment.

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Woodieb8 hit the nail on the head. 0.062" is less likely to bend.

OK! I guess the reason .045 works so well for me is that I cast the harness into Foam or UR. There's not much leverage that way.

(I fish mostly SW and those critters pull pretty hard)

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muskys have a tendency to torque and roll in the net. thats when equipment gets destroyed. most fish can be handled. but when theres 3 trebles and a mouthfull of teeth it can get hairy.

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