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basskat

Poe's 400 Look Alike

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Any of you guys whittle out a Poe's 400 look alike? I love painting crankbaits but ain't much on whittling them out.

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I have done quite a few for customers. I make them out of balsa and a special hardwood that I have found. They are not any harder to do than any other round crankbait. The main thing with round cranks is keeping the bodies straight. That is the toughest part. Try some with balsa. It is the quickest. If I can help you in any way let me know.

Skeeter

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Poe's is my favorite crankbait produced commercially. They had some problems for awhile but are back making quality baits again, I hear they went back to using the California Cedar. I have copied the 200, 300, and 400 in basswood, balsa, poplar, cedar, and even tried hickory once. Cedar is still my favorite to work with even with the health hazards; I do love how a cedar plug casts. If your clumsy at "whittling" you could try a Dupli-g8r to reproduce plugs for you, JIM

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I was thinking more in the line of buying a couple from you guys that whittle. With all my soft plastics, buzzbaits, spinnerbaits, and jigs that I pour, there's just not enough time for me to pick up another habit. :rolleyes: If any of you guys are interested pop me a pm.

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Celticav, at the risk of redigging once-plowed ground, cedar is also one of my favorite woods. I just didn't know there were any health hazards associated with it. Can you enlighten me and the rest of the late-comers to this site?

Thanks much

Dean

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Dean,

Ceadar has an oil in it that is supposidly toxic. The wood should be kiln dried to remove most of the oil. Most of the wood that you buy from wood supply stores have been kiln dried. This is what caused the problem that Celticav was talking about with Poes. When they were bought out many years ago they got a load of ceadar that was not kiln dried. They made the lures. After about a year the oil started to rise up out of the wood and caused the finishes to crack. If you are just making some lures for yourself then I would not worry. I would just wear a paper mask if you are doing any sanding with power tools. If you are going to really make alot of lures then I would invest in a respirator. I would advise you to do this with any wood. I have a special hard wood that I am currently using for some of my customers. The dust is extremely fine. The first couple of time that I sanded the stuff I got the dust in my nose and mouth from breathing while I was using a dremel. My throat got pretty sore and irritated for about 2 days. A paper mask did not do much better. It had too many leaks around the edges and I still had the problem. Now I use a respirator. I may look funny while working on my lures, but I have no more irritation. If you have just plain raw cedar then you can soak the wood in mineral spirits for a couple of hours and it should pull the oil out of the wood. But from what I understand, it makes the wood harder.

Skeeter

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Thanks a bunch Skeeter, I guess moths are smarter than I am. :oops: Actually when you said that about the oil in cedar it a faint bell rang. And I grind with a dremel a bunch so I appreciate the word on the respirator. I remember too from some asbestos education that respirators won't seal if you have a beard, which I do which is another thing to think about but I applaud you for wearing one. Safety first for sure, and it is something we should all think about and not just with the wood dust either but paint, glues, lead, plastics, etc. because it is too late when it is too late. Oh and special hardwood? :wink: Okay I won't ask. Thanks again for the info :!:

Dean

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