philB

Rounding of hardwood lures

85 posts in this topic

Pete, the negative curves can be handled by the rounded end of the belt sander surface as you suggested.

I've considered the round-over bits and the inverted router, but I'm not sure how easy or expensive it might be do deal with the varying thickness of wood.

Also I don't know how one could use a round over and still have a body that tapers at the tail and the head.

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Unless you are building flat sided baits, which don't particularly appeal to the eye, a belt sander is going to be needed anyway, so might as well do the whole job with one and remove the risk factor. I guess that I've just repeated what you have just stated Mr Fingers!

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If I could upload a Word Document with pictures, I could show you something that will do both concave and convex curves easily. I have just about finished a 'throughwire tutorial' but can' get it to load with the pics - drives me nuts this caper. pete

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Hopefully this works...

Nope, I can't embed the YouTube video. Maybe somebody who knows how can. The code is below.

Anyway, here's a link to "Routering a muskie bait" from a video I made before.

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Pete, the negative curves can be handled by the rounded end of the belt sander surface as you suggested.

I've considered the round-over bits and the inverted router, but I'm not sure how easy or expensive it might be do deal with the varying thickness of wood.

Also I don't know how one could use a round over and still have a body that tapers at the tail and the head.

1. Negative curves are easily sanded with a drum sander mounted in a drill press or with the use of an oscillating spindle sander.

2. Varying thicknesses of wood are dealt with by using different radii roundover bits. I bought a set of 5 recently for $25.

3. Tapers are cut first and then the roundover performed. Attention to detail around the change in slope is required to avoid mistakes, but it isn't all that hard. Touching up the change in slope areas is done by hand after routering.

And something that I didn't see mentioned (or I missed it) is in the original question of rounding over HARDWOOD lures it should also be mentioned that routering hardwood (especially, but cedar too!) should be done in a series of passes if the roundover is large. It's safer and also causes less chipping and tearing. One must be especially careful around end grain too!

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You're going to love this!

I walked into our carpentry shop a while ago and a carpenter was beltsanding a large piece of oak. No big deal right. Then I noticed the wood was in the middle of the bench, and no clamp's were in sight. All he had was this little mat under the wood. So with the use of this mat and a small router, I do all my roundover's with my hand's safely out of the way! For a full roundover say on a 3/4" thick lure I'll use a 3/8"roundover bit, backed out just slightly, leaving an edge for the guide bearing. A lure with a taper like a sucker, will be tapered first then routed. these grip mat's can be purchased at any woodworker's store.

Douglas

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Very cool! It looks similar to the mats they put between a futon and its frame.

Another method I've seen used is a vacuum table, of course it might be a tad more costly than a simple mat.

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Hi Phil

I use a bench mounted router to round of my baits which are similar to yours, i also use beech and a bit of meranti and have had no problems with it,admittedly a bit nerve wracking when you first start to use it but with big baits it's definately the way to go in my opinion.

Mark

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Hi Mark

Haven't posted for a while and nice to see your still hard at it :) .

Rowhunter, I have some of that stuff in my car on the dashboard which stops things sliding around. I had never thought about using it for that but will try anything once :yay:

philB

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I have read a few posts lately, here and on other forum, on sanding curves- I posted this recently on another forum, so hope you get something out of it.

This will not quite do compound curves but will do concave/ convex. I made this about 20 years ago and have used it for all my sanding ever since.

I use a disc sander I made with a motor from a free standing (i.e. portable) evaporative cooler (not sure what you call them there), I picked it up at the rubbish tip for $10. Just pull the

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Pete, you're a clever devil! That looks like something my Dad would have cooked up. His garage was full of home made tools, and all they did was exactly what they were supposed to do.

Nice job, and thanks for sharing.

P.S.

I'm a much better carpenter than my Dad ever was, but he was a lot smarter than I.

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Pete, you're a clever devil! That looks like something my Dad would have cooked up. His garage was full of home made tools, and all they did was exactly what they were supposed to do.

Nice job, and thanks for sharing.

P.S.

I'm a much better carpenter than my Dad ever was, but he was a lot smarter than I.

Mark- after reading all these posts, I realised that I was probably the only one doing this, which does not seem possible. When I was making lures to sell (20 yrs ago),I used a router with a full round over bit (20mm) to do this. I made multiple baits on a plank (about 15 at a time) which was pretty quick, but they still had to be sanded. Now I only make a few for my own use / amusment and the sander does a good job, it's quick, safer and does not annoy the neighbours. pete

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Mark- after reading all these posts, I realised that I was probably the only one doing this, which does not seem possible. When I was making lures to sell (20 yrs ago),I used a router with a full round over bit (20mm) to do this. I made multiple baits on a plank (about 15 at a time) which was pretty quick, but they still had to be sanded. Now I only make a few for my own use / amusment and the sander does a good job, it's quick, safer and does not annoy the neighbours. pete

Pete, since I have my own residential const. company, I have more tools than I ever dreamed I'd own when I was young.

But the handiest tools I have, other than my hands, are a band saw and an oscilating belt/spindle sander from Home Depot. It's their Rigid line.

With those two, I can rough out a wood swim bait in fifteen minutes. I finish them with rasps, files, and sand paper.

Symentry isn't that important in surface baits, and I get it close enough for me.

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I'm using like the video example that Lunge put up...it's dangerous though, be careful!

Rowhunter.......I'm amazed the bait doesn't fly off the table routering like that!

Hazmail........very clever!! I like it!

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After rough out with the Dremel drum sander, I finish all the cuves by hand. I have a series of pvc,copper and aluminum tubes that cover 1/4 to 2" radius. Rough sand paper and some spray adhesive. This has been a good option for those of us not manufacturing and not using power tools. The tubes can be split in half or quartered.

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Vince- Yes , I do the profile first, then tapered sides and then convex back and last a slightly concave bottom. pete

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Deheron - I have also used these tubes and they are quite good for removing those bumps in a profile and also getting the 'perfect' curve, you just have to find that right diameter. pete

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