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Tally

new to airbrush! HELP

13 posts in this topic

I have heard so much talk about airbrushing, that I thought I might give it a try. What is the difference in tip size, 1,3,5?

I will most likely be using the airbrush for fine detail.

Thanks for any help!

Tally

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The #1 is for thin stuff and the #5 for thick. I just use the #3 tip for everything. It is the best for all around stuff.

Skeeter

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When learning ...stick to that no. 3......I rarely use the other needles at all.

Play on paer then go to the lures.

Hey Skeeter....I grew up in Charlotte/Mathews N.C. (a.k.a. Carolina Chip) Been in Michigan for 10 years.

Good Luck Talley

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Thanks to both. If I understand this correctly, the tip has very little to do with pattern and the consistancy of the paint would determine the tip size.

I tip my hat to those of you who can draw a narrow/thin straight line. I guess I will spend my winter learning how to use an airbrush.

Is there a book that covers all of the basics including the effects of high and low air pressure that would help a beginner?

Thanks Tally

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Talley:

Try here: http://www.howtoairbrush.com/Lindex.htm

By the way, I was sayin try on paper first then go to the lures. Tip size does matter on what you paint with regard to detail but viscosity and pressure must be balanced and you can do that by adjusting all three (including tip). Not hard. But typically for me....paintin lures the #3 works fine because I use template mask and tape mask. I then go back and feather and blend in where i need. The number three spray pattern works for all my task.

Check out those lessons and practice on paper. Soon you'll be able to sign your name with the thing.

Good Luck

Take Care.

Chip

carolinachip@att.net

PS...I am finishing up another bleedin shad and a "crazy phishbones" (my name) blackshore. I will be postin them to the web in a few days.

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Thanks Chip!!

I think I will have to practice a bunch before I will be able to write my name.

Nice web site. The instructions on how to make a crankbait were very interesting. Someday, maybe I will try to make one. How many tries before you got the balance right and to where the bait ran true with the wiggle/wobble you were looking for.

Tally

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Chip,

I am originally from Louisville Ky. I moved here 5 years ago to take a job. N.C. is a beautifull state and the folks here are great. The only problem that I have is that everyone in the state is a NASCAR driver. Just ask them.

Tally,

You should get some balsa at the local hobby shop and start making that bait NOW!! Don't put it off....... get at it. It is alot of fun and really helps you get through the winter. All of us on the site would be glad to help. It might take a few baits being made before you have one made just right. But if you are like Coley..... It won't take you long before you can make and paint crankbaits with the best of them. If I can help you, just holler!!

Skeeter

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Skeeter

I appreciate the offer to help. I may take you up on that. Soon as I get this airbrush down, I might just try a crankbait. Do you buy the balsa in blocks or ?... and what size.

Tally

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I go to a hobby shop in town that carries balsa for guys that make RC Planes. The balsa that they use for wings is 3ft long X 4in. wide X 1/2in. thick. It works great. The wood is already the width that I use. You can buy it in blocks and cut them to size. It is not expensive at all. I pay about 3.50 per board. You can get alot of crankbaits out of it.

Skeeter

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Alright Skeeter! You may be sorry you invited me to the world of crankbaits. Here is a few questions.

through out the site, I see cranks with the line tie in the bill and in the body above the bill. What is the difference?

on wood cranks, do they need to be weighted or will the design of the bait take care of that problem?

do all cranks have the wire hook hanger inside, or is that done because of the type wood used?

Tally

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Tally,

Line ties above the bills are thru wire construction. The bait is cut in half and a wire is run from nose to tail. The front is for the line tie and the rear is the hook hanger. These are usually shallow running baits like the Bagleys Balsa BII. Folks like BlackJack on this site also do it with flat crankbaits. But they are mostly shallow running lures. Line ties in the lip are for deeper running crankbaits. We can teach you how to do either of them. But I would suggest making flat crankbaits first.

You will need to weight them regardless of the type of wood. I would suggest you start with balsa. But being the hard head that I am I started with poplar. I still make some of my cranks out of it. Balsa is very forgiving when learning to weight the lure.

Hook hangers are in the bodies for stregnth. Embedding them in the wood and putting them in place with epoxy, makes a very strong hook hanger.

What else? There are some very very good crankbait makers here on the site. If I don't know the answer, I promise you that someone here does. It's funny, the guys that are really tallented and good you would expect to keep all of their secrets. But they share more information than anyone. So ask away. Hell, I'm thinking about signing up for Coley's school of crankbait making. We have all learned from him. And he has been doing it for less than a year.

Skeeter

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Tally,

Don't pay any attention to Skeeter, he helped me get

started. I asked 400 questions on TM and TU.

The guys were great, all of them. The first bait I made

sunk to the bottom. But, it did swim good. The wood

was to heavy and the lead made it worse. I tried balsa

by itself and didn't have much luck getting it shaped right.

So, I made the balsa/cedar lure and thats what I am

making and selling here in Columbia, TN.

When I started, I had no intention of selling. They just

came to me.

There are so many good guys here, very few questions go unanswered.

If I can help you in anyway let me know.

And one more thing, I don't have a school!!!!!!

Coley

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Skeeter and Coley

Meet "hard head" #2!!!!!!

I don't know if making the bait or the challenge is more fun. As long as I keep it as a hobby. If this ever becomes a "job", I will be done.

I appreciate all the help and you are right, there is a lot of fantastic people on this site.

I like Coley's idea on the cedar/balsa combination. How did you do it? A Poe's 300 series is about 1" wide and if balsa comes 1/2" thick and you use a 1/2" piece of cedar, that tells me after you carve the lure, you only have 1/4" of balsa on each side.

I assume you did this for 1.) the balsa is easier to cut/whittle and 2.) the cedar will retain the hook screws better and a hanger is not required.

Did you make your lip/bill on the Poe's look a like or purchase them and where?

Thanks. I can tell you right now, I would not be trying this without your encouragement.

Tally

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