fourbizzle

Epoxying Eye Screws

19 posts in this topic

I have been running my screw eyes in and then backing them out, filling the hole with epoxy and running them back in. How much stronger is this than without epoxy? The wood I am using is fairly hard and the screw eyes are quite long. This is just a real time consuming process and I am wondering if it is an unneccesary step. Any thoughts?

Jay

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I think the only true advantage of doing this on a wood lures is to make sure that you do not get much water soaking into the lure if the screw eye twists. I ran a few tests on some lures awhile back and found that it did not take much to twist the epoxied eyes, but "sumo glue" (urethane glue that expands) locked them in much tighter. I usually only partially pre-drill the hole, dab the end of the screw eye in the glue and screw in the eye. I really do not believe it adds much holding power to the screw eye in hardwood.

Cliff

www.alleycatlures.com

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Jay,

You said, "I have been running my screw eyes in and then backing them out, filling the hole with epoxy and running them back in."

I always look for a easier way to do most things. :whistle: Have you seen the screw eye bit driver for a cordless drill? It might make life a little better.

Bruce

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Maybe now i have a chance to give something back!

I actually have seen those at Stamina. I am using their .092 eyes and attempted to order those once but i couldn't get the page to load. I discovered that if you take a 1/4 drive socket extension and chuck it into the drill with the male end in the chuck, you get a perfectly sized driver for the .092's .

If I was running those 1.5" things in by hand i would definitely forgo the epoxy :teef:!

But still, with 4 screws per bait and usual batches of 5 or 6 baits, thats quite a bit of time. As long as it is worth it, I am happy to do it.

In reference to the sumo glue, is that comparable to "gorilla glue"? I have some of that and had considered it before, but not tried it.

Thanks for the help guys!

Jay

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I through wire balsa, so I shouldn't get involved!

My thought is that the glue is stronger than the wood. So why not drill oversize so that the screw just pushes in. Thoroughly fill the hole and coat the threads with epoxy and push in. My argument is that the extra void space gives more space for the adhesive to do its job.

By screwing into a tight hole, all the adhesive does is prevent the screw from backing out. You need only apply a drip to the last few threads to achieve this.

Controversial? Probably, but I'm ready and braced for the good thrashing that you are all about to deliver. I'm sure that many of you musky guys are cringing, but until someone does a comparative pull test, we will never know the truth.

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Jay, the Sumo glue is simalar to the gorilla glue but does not expand as much and dries transparent white. The screw eye bits from Stamina are great and save alot of time. You can also open the eye of one of the screw eyes and put the threaded end into a hand drill and use the open eye to drive them. Not as easy as the Stamina driver, but it helps. I would not use them in balsa or simalar wood if fishing for large fish but if installed right in harder material they are hard to beat. I can hang off of one of my lures attached to the basement ceiling and swing like a monkey. I figure if I ever catch a 200 pound muskie with no drag, my line will snap first.

Cliff

www.alleycatlures.com

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we pre drill before sealing the lure. there is no need to glue unless you use very short screws or very soft wood.. as stated a 0.92 screw will not pull out. even 1 inch stainless will hold big fish.

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I through wire balsa, so I shouldn't get involved!

My thought is that the glue is stronger than the wood. So why not drill oversize so that the screw just pushes in. Thoroughly fill the hole and coat the threads with epoxy and push in. My argument is that the extra void space gives more space for the adhesive to do its job.

By screwing into a tight hole, all the adhesive does is prevent the screw from backing out. You need only apply a drip to the last few threads to achieve this.

Controversial? Probably, but I'm ready and braced for the good thrashing that you are all about to deliver. I'm sure that many of you musky guys are cringing, but until someone does a comparative pull test, we will never know the truth.

Funny you mention the epoxy being stronger than the wood.

The strongest method of attaching hardware is to drill a pilot hole the length of the fastener, then open the hole up to twice the diameter of the threads for half of the length. Fill the hole with epoxy and screw down the fastener.

It's a pretty standard method when bedding hardware into wood for boat building/repair, so it should be the ticket for screw eyes in lures. Then again, I through wire all of my baits too so what do I know?

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spike a pike . i am george i build the woodie bait. i am a de-ranged bait builder. lol. anyhow the guys here are great. its humbling to see folks from around the globe. the skills presented are mind boggling. well its off to reality. work.

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Hello George,

Like I told the RiverMan, I am just trying to figure out "who's who". Nice passing 1s and 0s across the inter-web with you. Normally, I a wire bending, fur & feather tying kind of guy... but I get to looking at some of these hard baits and start seeing MUSKY!!!!!

I have got to get to Canada some day.

Bruce

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Jay,

You said, "I have been running my screw eyes in and then backing them out, filling the hole with epoxy and running them back in."

I always look for a easier way to do most things. :whistle: Have you seen the screw eye bit driver for a cordless drill? It might make life a little better.

Bruce

An allen wrench small enought to fit into the screw eye and with the long end chucked in your cordless drill does the trick nicely.

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If you want the control of doing it by hand, but some speed, just take an 8d finish nail, and put a 90 degree bend in each end, with the bent part being about 1/2", and facing opposite, like a flat Z. It makes running 1 1/2" screw eyes in or out a breeze.

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