tc-lures

Test Tank

60 posts in this topic

What about something like a lure test track? Half-pipe with 90 deg. elbows. Water flow created with a paddle wheel and motor.

Yes Goolies you got it- That's what I forgot to add to my circular tank thing, the island in the middle to stop the vortex. Basically that's what I saw Rapala using years ago. pete

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I wish I could view the vids, something is not set up right on my laptop. I'll have to take it to the shop one day, unless one of you guru's can make a suggestion.

Can't help with the vids, but the Rapala test tank is as follows: A large trough runs alongside a wall, placed at waist-height. The inside of the trough is painted white (a helpful detail, I think), and looks somewhat like a very long bathtub. The workers have short 'fishing poles' with a few feet of string on the end, and either drag the lures through, or walk them down the tank. With this setup, a bunch of lures can be checked very quickly and efficiently for both floatation and balance, as well as run slow and fast.

With a "flow tank" and several of lures to test, I reckon you'd want to test 'em all for buoyancy/balance with no flow, and then test them all again for tracking with the flow on. Seems cumbersome, but I see how it could prove useful to some. I usually prefer to test each lure for all aspects at the same time.

Well there you go- of course' date=' we don't need any flow at all, funny how I can make mountains out of mole hills. Thanks Sagacious.pete[/quote']

Now don't go thinking that way, Pete! I've very much enjoyed reading your many ingenious, pragmatic, and straight-forward solutions for lure building, and I'm sure many TU members have also benefitted. Keep 'em coming!

For my part, if I had a large round tank with a pump and recirculating water, I'd fill it with live bait! ;)

Cheers, all.

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Now don't go thinking that way, Pete! I've very much enjoyed reading your many ingenious, pragmatic, and straight-forward solutions for lure building, and I'm sure many TU members have also benefitted. Keep 'em coming!

I'll second that!

Keep em coming, Pete.

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Well there you go- of course, we don't need any flow at all, funny how I can make mountains out of mole hills. Thanks Sagacious.pete

Sorry if this came across as sarcasm, it was not meant to be. I watched the videos but did not notice it was just a large bath tub. Some times I miss the obvious, looking for the complex **.pete

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Sorry if this came across as sarcasm, it was not meant to be. I watched the videos but did not notice it was just a large bath tub. Some times I miss the obvious, looking for the complex **.pete

No worries, mate! Didn't come across as sarcasm at all. Just saying that I think we all appreciate the results of your brainstorming. What I meant was, "Don't stop thinking and looking at problems the way you do." All viewpoints and ideas are universally helpful-- and what might seem complicated to one, may inspire a simple solution for another.

Very often, it seems to me that your ideas and methods are actually very simple, very practical, and very useful! I enjoy reading and learning from them.

Cheers and three beers! :yay:

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Well guys, now we need to determine if we'd really want to fill the test tank with water, or would there be a better fuild to test the hydrodinamic's. I was thinking beer might work pretty good... You can see the lure through it, the foam would help high lite "flow disruptions" (I hate flow disruptions, any disruptions for that matter!!!!), and the tank would have to drained before it goes flat.:tipsy:

Maybe Vodkaman has some input for this aspect of the project... Sorry the help didn't.:sauced:

Bruce

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Thanks Guys

you are giving be a bunch of things to think about.

My main concerns are cost and size, since my shop is small I need something easy to drain and store, I can't have it sitting outside (it will freeze up)

thanks Todd

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A very interesting and valid point Spike. On the surface, a very silly idea, but I think that you are hiding a deeper knowledge of the subject.

'Dynamic similitude' and the science of Reynolds numbers etc is used extensively in science and engineering, prior to building full size models, for testing aerodynamic behavior.

I explored the idea of testing in air. I calculated that a speed of about 30mph (from memory, long time ago) would be equivalent to 1m/s or two cranks per sec. I even managed to talk another TU member (I don't drive cars, I just design them) into testing the theory. Unfortunately, it did not work and it can be very embarrassing explaining your antics to the nice police officer.

Todd, as for storage, the circular tank wins there too, it can be hung on the wall.

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I wanted a test tank but eventually decided that a really useful one would not fit the garage. Medium to deep divers would be digging the bottom of any tank less than 6 ft deep almost immediately, or would have to be held up artificially in the water flow. What would that tell me about their performance in the real world? I'm not sure.

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BobP, I already thought about this one. The lure will swim to a maximum line angle (line to water). Once this angle is reached, the lure swims horizontal. It will have a nose down attitude, as it will have in the lake, but it will not swim any deeper.

In a test tank, this angle can be accurately measured. This measurement will not tell you exactly how deep the lure will dive, but it will give a good comparison to divers of known depth.

If the lure hits the bottom of the tank, shorten the line or raise the tow point on the tank rig, to allow some lateral swim room.

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I just got an email with the perfect test tank. Big, cheap, and portable.

A guy lined the bed of his pickup with a sheet of plastic, filled it with water and, voila! It's not too deep, but it's plenty big enough to test shallow stuff, and swimbaits.

Plus it's portable. In this time of drought all over the country, you just drive it to the spot that needs water, and drop the tail gate.

Of course, the picture I saw showed him floating in the tank in an inner tube with a cold Bud in his hand. I think the Bud may be the key to the effectiveness of the tank.

I couldn't make out the brand of pickup, so I can't be sure that didn't have a bearing on tank performance, too.

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If you really want to video tape the test, substitute mini-van sun roof for pickup truck, use RTV to seal the water in, tune the heater/ac ducts to adjust the flow rate, depending on center console options, we might even get some low level wind shear ellements to factor in.:whistle:

As long as it's a rental and you take the insurance, testing could cost as little as $19.95 a day as long as you don't rack up the milage...:popcorn: If you bring a "business contact", it's a complete tax write off!!!

Think of the possiblities.... Excuse, they want me to take my "Medication" again.

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On a semi-serious note, a sheet of plywood, or a 2'X8' rip, with 2X12 sides and ends, lined with plastic, would make a shallow test tank, cheap. If you have it outside, you can just put it together, paint it, and no plastic. As long as you make good cuts and screw the pieces together, it will hold water for testing, and, eventually, self drain. That might eliminate the problem of trying to drain it.

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On a semi-serious note, a sheet of plywood, or a 2'X8' rip, with 2X12 sides and ends, lined with plastic, would make a shallow test tank, cheap. If you have it outside, you can just put it together, paint it, and no plastic. As long as you make good cuts and screw the pieces together, it will hold water for testing, and, eventually, self drain. That might eliminate the problem of trying to drain it.

Good idea. Paint the inside with white enamel paint, caulk/seal the joints, and you're set. No need to line it wth plastic, and installing a drain (pvc tube with cap) is simple.

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A guy lined the bed of his pickup with a sheet of plastic, filled it with water and, voila!

I'd be tempted to stock it full of threadfin shad and one musky...just to watch.

When the shad are all gone, you've really got yourself a test tank.

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To go back to the round test tank. If you used a high volume livewell/bilge pump to circulate the water and put a plexiglas window on one side you could analyze the action very easily. Move the lure closer to the center or adjust the pump output, or both for less speed. Maybe???

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Tony,

I really have given this a little thought... If the goal is to video the lure to examine how it performs, say a "wiggle to speed" ratio, I think a round tank with an island in the center with a variable speed pump is the way to go. Each lure of that design could be viewed and tuned to an exact profile and dynamics.

If you’re wanting more basic testing to test buoyancy and tune an individual lure, not a high volume production run, I think the portable test tank from plywood with a sheet of plastic or an even better sealing method would meet a craftsman’s need for lure testing.

I’m sure the great test tank de-bait (okay, I thought that spelling would be worth a smile) will continue, But, lets keep it fun, shall we?

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