CRANKBAIT

Math colors?

16 posts in this topic

Math Guys,

Is there a mathematical connection between the blocks of color.(maybe??? Example: ? drops of yellow + ? drops of blue = ? green) or is this a trial and error problem?

* see attachment for blocks of color

color card.pdf

color card.pdf

color card.pdf

color card.pdf

color card.pdf

color card.pdf

color card.pdf

color card.pdf

color card.pdf

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Good question, but I cannot think of anything. Their probably is, because the computer has to calculate what pixels to light on your screen. I know that uses some really heavy math.

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The local Lowes has a machine/computer that can take any color swatch you bring in and duplicate the color. The algorithm running in the application is “crunching numbers faster than a squirrel crunching nuts”. Just find the guy that wrote it, invest $500.00 entertaining him at a strip joint, and write your own code. That’s like, what, 36 hours total time??? ;)

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every brand of paint is different, every tint base is even more different. doing some testing with your own supply is all you can do. Why do you think Major paint retailers say to mix all your paints into one container before applying as it blends all the variations in color. If sherwin williams can't mix every batch the same there is no way jos blow from our garage will be able to.

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Math Guys,

Is there a mathematical connection between the blocks of color.(maybe??? Example: ? drops of yellow + ? drops of blue = ? green) or is this a trial and error problem?

* see attachment for blocks of color

Red+Green= yelow (dont remember exactly), ...serch in the art forums, they will tell you exactly

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Next Idea

Mixing Createx Colors: Photoshop

* see attachment for color card

1. Took samplings from createx color chart. Note numbers down the left side correspond with createx colors.

2. Decided that 25% opacity would equal 1 drop of createx.

3. Loaded yellow pallet with 100% yellow

4. Used multiply to fill pallet with 25%-100% blue. Numbers across the top indicate the percentage/drops of blue.

Could it be this simple or ??? Anyone care to test the chart to see if we are close?

color card - createx.pdf

color card - createx.pdf

color card - createx.pdf

color card - createx.pdf

color card - createx.pdf

color card - createx.pdf

color card - createx.pdf

color card - createx.pdf

color card - createx.pdf

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I post this diagram a lot but I think it will answer a lot of questions about the colors. Mix the primary colors equally and it will result in the secondary colors and mix the secondary color with the primary color and it will result in the tertiary color.

It will all depend on the quality and quantity of pigments in your paints as to how exact it matches. Testing is the best way to get your paint pallet complete.

Buy some extra jars to mix in and yes you will waist some paint. start off with small amounts and then you will start to learn what makes what.

:? But there is no brown?

Buy burnt umber, or mix a little yellow, blue, and red and see if that is what you are looking for.

colourwheel.jpg

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PB,

Are you able to mix Createx colors in quantity, and store them? I always have left overs when I'm mixing colors, and sure would like to be able to save them to use later.

And.....do regular paint tinting colors, like you get in the tubes at the paint store, work for airbrush water based paints, or are the pigments too coarse to spray?

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I am an art teacher and I am not sure inputting numbers into photoshop will equate to the same colors in paint. Here's why. A computer uses the primary colors from light, which are red, green, and blue. However, pigment (paint) primary colors are different, they are red, yellow, and blue.

Basically all other colors are made from mixing combinations of two of the three primary colors. Check the charts from the previous posts and you will see this is true. With the two systems using different primary colors, mixing newcolors will give different results.

As a basic guide, in pigment (paint) red+yellow+orange; red+blue+violet; yellow+blue=green; Then, from these secondary colors you can mix others, such as yellow+orange=yelloworange; blue+violet=blueviolet; etc.

Brown is a bit trickier. In theory, brown is an equal amount of two complimentary colors mixed together, for example equal amounts of red and green, yellow and violet, or blue and orange. But, due to impurities in pigments results may vary.

Gray can be made by mixing equal amounts of all three primary colors, again red, yellow, and blue. Again this is theory, actual results may vary.

Try a google search for "color theory" and you'll probably get a bunch of good info. I hope this has been helpful!

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A color wheel only works if you begin with pure red, pure blue, pure yellow. Equal parts blue and yellow equal green, that is to say pure green. Red and yellow yield orange, pure orange. On and on, just like the above wheel shows.

One neat thing about the wheel, you can darken a color by using just a touch of the opposite color on the wheel.....to darken pure yellow, use a very little of the purple....rather than darkening with black. Using the opposite color to darken will yield a darker yellow, but will still have the healthy yellow glow. Mix with black and it pushes the yellow toward gray and you lose the yellow glow.

If you mix too much of the opposite color with the one you want to darken, it will turn to mud. What makes the whole thing really interesting is the combinations change the possibilities.....if for example, you darken a green with a red orange, etc. Green pumpkin is, a combination of black, chartreuse and brown.

Certain pigments also contain extras, for example my powder paint in black also contains a little blue, so when I mix black with chartreuse I get a lighter green pumpkin. Brown contains red which will darken the green in the light green pumpkin and tone it down to a standard green pumpkin.

If you keep track of what you use in mixing by writing it down, you can get there again when needed.

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Very sound advice all over. Forget about ur Photoshop Crankbait ;). I'm sure you know about color management in Photoshop and that is to manage the color process from RGB to CMYK and ensure WYSIWYG from designing on screen to printing.

Pantone color system is one of the industrial standard that can apply to paint. If you insist on doing a simulation on computer you should consider ColorVision Spyder on ur monitor for a correct color match 1st then color manage to simulate Pantone colors. Finally to get to the paint itself you'll have to find one that adheres to the Pantone standards. Other standards available too, if you can get you hands on a color profile for it.

Go with what Mac10 said. Computer colors are just not made for hobby stuff. Pigments used in paints are not as pure as theory suggest as well. Even just black comes in red, blue, purple and brown base depending on manufactures :), they are not as pure as we imagine.

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I have some mixed colors I use a lot and store them in 1-2 oz bottles with no problem. Just shake it well before use. Don't know the particle size in the tubes of paint but doubt it's as fine as airbrush paint. I assumed the squeeze tubes were oil based pigments.

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