Palmetto Balsa

Need help with density of wood.

36 posts in this topic

Here are the 2 formulas for density and pounds per cubic foot.

Density

Grams / Cubic cm = Density

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Density Water=1 and Air=0

Pounds per Cubic Foot of a specific piece of wood.

1728 / Cubic Inches x Ounces / 16 = Pounds per Cubic Foot

(1728 inches in a cubic ft divided by, cubic inches of your piece of wood times, ounces of your piece of wood divided by, 16 ounces in a pound is equal to the pounds per cubic foot of you piece of wood.)

I think I've got it.

Thanks for all the help.

Now I have to grab my pieces of Paulownia to see what I have. (slow growth or fast growth.)

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Vman,

I actually do a fair amount of conversion to metric in my work. European cabinetry and fittings. And Japanese and Chinese stuff, too.

I just enjoy the differences. I do not, however, grasp the "stones" concept yet. No, not those stones :o).

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I think stones are more a British thing. About the only thing they are used for is body weight. Large bags of potatoes, cement etc are sold by the hundred weight, which is 112 lbs or 8 stones! It just gets worse.

Britain was resqued from a lot worse about 35 years ago. The monetary system was called LSD. LSD helped to get your head around it. Twelve pennies in a shilling, twenty shillings in a pound. One pound and one shilling in a guinnea. The coins were: farthing, hap'ny, penny, thripny bit, tanner, shilling (bob), floreign (2 bob), half a crown (2 'n 6), crown (5 bob), ten shilling note and a quid. To think people fought tooth and nail against decimalization!

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Thanks Vman,

I guess our monetary system is sort'a metric based also.

5 pennies to nickle,

10 pennies or 2 nickles to a dime

25 pennies or 5 nickles or 2 dimes + 1 nickle to a quarter

50 pennies or 10 nickles or 5 dimes or 2 quarters to a half dollar

100 pennies or 20 nickles or 10 dimes or 4 quarters to a dollar

SImple... So simple, most school kids won't bother with anything less than a dollar, spoiled little brats... lol

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But our nails are still measured in penny weights, and lots of other construction materials are still measured in "English".

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Another scarey fact, most aircraft are designed in feet and inches. Every car I have worked on has been designed in metric.

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Bottom line is that, nominally one metric lure builder is equal to one imperial lure builder:). Everything else is just semantics:wink:

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keram,

Try telling that to the Mars Lander team whose lander overshot or crashed (they're not sure which) when one team used Imperial and the other used Metric.

Talk about poor communications!

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keram,

Try telling that to the Mars Lander team whose lander overshot or crashed (they're not sure which) when one team used Imperial and the other used Metric.

Talk about poor communications!

They weren't TU members and instead of a "Mars Lander" they should have been working on a "Mars Lure". Hey if they find water, just think of a the new Martian fish records that you'd be setting every trip out to the water... What the hey, it could happen like that... lol

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I'm not real sure about calculating any density of wood, but if you are concerned about the ballast and balancing of any lure, the added weight of treble hooks, eye screws, lexan lips, and split rings is usually enough to give a balsa wood lure the ballast it needs to float vertically, provided that the lure is roughly shaped like a plug and not a surf board

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I'm not real sure about calculating any density of wood, but if you are concerned about the ballast and balancing of any lure, the added weight of treble hooks, eye screws, lexan lips, and split rings is usually enough to give a balsa wood lure the ballast it needs to float vertically, provided that the lure is roughly shaped like a plug and not a surf board

Is that so?? I don't think I have ever seen a balsa lure that was not belly,tail or throat weighted perform efficiently.

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