A-Mac

prepaing the wood for paint + clear coating

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I'm experimenting w/ jointed bream patterned swim baits. I've been carving my own cranks for 8 years w/ space in between. However, I suck at painting. I'm particularly curious as to wood preparations (after sanding) before painting. Also, after painting I have some auto clear coat that I have been applying but question my techniques. I've tried dipping, spraying, and brushing but the super smooth finish that I'm looking for just doesn't seem to be happening. I have had better results w/ painting and clear coating my foiled cranks as opposed to directly painted wood. If someone doesn't mind telling me how they do these particular steps I would greatly appreciate it. Also, i have heard of a spinning technique for clear coating. What does this mean?

Live2Fish~Fish2Live

Aaron

Purdue Bass Club

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You need to seal the wood before you paint it, as it's porous. The reason the finish is not smooth is the wood is soaking your coating up.

Do a search for sealing baits for some ideas.

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Well i checked out the plastic cups+ Lacquer thinner idea. This sounds pretty cool. I'm curious if this method has been used as a final clear coat by anyone? If not, what is a reliable final clear coat.

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I use the propionate pellets & i´ve used it as a topcoat over waterbased& laquerpaints .I like it because its so easy to use & theres no potlife to worry about

All dripoffs can be used over & over again .When your bait is beatup rub/scuff it & do few dips& the bait looks brand new

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Propionate pellets eh? What are those and where can buy some. Do you use it combined w/ thinner as well?

I can't begin to tell you all how much this website has helped me just in the past couple days! Every tactic I used to make my baits up to this point has been self taught mainly because most of these techniques are kept in such secrecy by their respective creators.

Thank you all!

Aaron

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The least fussy clearcoats are polyurethane and epoxy, IMO. If you want one that levels out very well, covering minor sanding flaws, etc, and leaving a very smooth finish, then epoxy is stuff. The thickest is Devcon Two Ton, sold in a double syringe at Walmart for about $2. Mix it well at 70 degrees, brush it on and rotate the bait for the first 45 mins, then hang it up to cure for 24 hrs. It's one of the most reliable, most used clearcoats among hobby builders and is also used by quite a few custom crankbait makers.

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