Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
stumpy

Wooden Floats

10 posts in this topic

Does anyone here make or can direct me to information on making wooden floats. I know this may not be the right place being the hard bait forum but this is as close as I can get. Lots of info here on painting wooden lures should apply to floats. I've got the woodworking tools, desire and a long winter to spend time learning. Just need pointed in the right direction. i did see some nice examples of custom floats in the gallery but my search for more information has dried up. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Riverman builds those beautiful floats in the gallery.

Here is one method of making the shaft thru body style: Design the size of float to match your intended useage. Use balsa, cork or cedar. Drill, turn, or shape your float body. Use hard bamboo skewers for the shaft. Finish. Use 1/8" silicon tubbing on the line to attach to the shafts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I make floats but I make the slip bobber style. Is this what you are interested in? If so email me and Ill send you pics and answer any questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stumpy,

What kind of floats do you want to build? You mentioned wood, are you thinking of balsa, or other types of wood? The floats in the gallery are some of the first that I built, most I build now are more "traditional in shape and color" and I like to think much better. The floats in the gallery I built from the stem of a native plant that grows near my home. The material is perfect, a thin outer bark with a foam material in the inside. I collect the stems, remove the bark, and then shape them on an electric sander. I then paint the floats and finish with epoxy. I am guessing each float takes me an hour to build, lots of fun but nothing that's going to make money. Mostly I build the floats for friends. I have my own lathe but have not shaped any balsa floats yet. If you are interested in doing so, do a search on "lathing balsa" at Google.com in the "newsgroups" section.

Here is a link I found of a guy that really builds some beautiful stuff, these are mostly "decorative" floats tho as they are too heavy to be very functional, take a look:

http://www.geocities.com/owlfoot6297/MyFloatsAndBobbers.html

I spent several months trying to find information on building floats. I tried for an equal amount of time to find companies that offer float components, no luck. Most float builders I have spoken to are very secretive about where they obtain materials and how each float is built. I did see once however where a guy took a piece of plexiglass and cut it at the same shape of a float body he wanted. He glued sand paper to the end of the plexi and then used this "template" to create exact duplicates of the floats on a lathe. I am sure the same thing could be done by lure builders as well.

I have built waggler bottom slip type floats (slip loop on bottom) and center slip floats of all sizes and shapes. If you are really serious about building "good floats" I would suggest that you spend as much time as possible online researching "european floats" as they are the true masters of this endeavor. There are companies in Europe that offer more than 400 different styles of floats! In America, you will be lucky to find a tackle shop that offers more than 20.

Have fun!

jed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gentleman, thanks for the replies. I was out today for steelhead. Landed 5 out of 8 hooked. Broke one off where the styrafoam bobber clipped on to the line. This has happened to me more times than I can count. I would like to design a float specific for steelheading. I fish both streams and still water. The float doesn't need to be very bouyant as it only has to support a 1/32oz jig and maybe a BB size splitshot. It needs to be heavy enough to cast long distances and visible in rough water. Small enough to detect light strikes. The float I am using is 2/3 the size of a walnut. Basswood or cedar maybe? I even have a good bit of mahogany laying about. And it must not pinch the line. A slip float will not work because of the light weight jig. Adding weight to the line robs action from the jig on a dead drift. But most of all I'd like it to be unique to our area. Something to make that other guy ask where I got it. I agree the Europeans are very into their floats. I must do some reasurch. I will try to keep this board updated as this winters project progresses. Thanks again......Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Stumpy,

I used to be heavily into steelheading, but only go a few times a year now. Anyway, I've got some info on float making, but it's a photocopy of the original material. If you send me a mailing address, I'll photocopy and send you what I have. If you're interested, send me a PM and I'll make and mail the copies to you.

Cheers,

o2l

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Stumpy,

I used to be heavily into steelheading, but only go a few times a year now. Anyway, I've got some info on float making, but it's a photocopy of the original material. If you send me a mailing address, I'll photocopy and send you what I have. If you're interested, send me a PM and I'll make and mail the copies to you.

Cheers,

o2l

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stumpy; You've seen the foam float we use out west? no sharp edges -instantly adjustable. You would need a very small size for your application.

Ever tried using a large 'corkie' drift bobber for float? I use 'em for an indicator when fly fishing. You could add a skewer to attach to the line and make it adjustabe too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking about making tiny foam cylinder floats. You could use the foam available to stuff cracks around windows and doors. It comes in several diameters. Just cut the length you need, and paint the top a bright, highly vissable color. Insert a small plastic tube on a 45 deg. angle in each end, glue in place. The main-line goes in the top center, out the side, around the float body, then out through the bottom. Friction holds it on the line, but still allows for adjustment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0