Snax

Drilling swimbait hinge pin holes question

11 posts in this topic

Hey folks,

I've noticed that even when using my drill press it can be tricky to drill the holes for the hinge pins of my swimbaits perfect. I drill all the way through from top to bottom in one shot and often the hole at the bottom doesn't quite match the hole at the top. I assume that this is due to the bit flexing.The lure is held in place with a vise with a cross vise with rubber jaw covers.

Do any of you have any tips or tricks that might help? By the way I use a Brad point bit. That particular bit wasn't the best in quality so perhaps a more expensive bit would flex less?

Thanks in advance folks.

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Same thing happens to me. I drill before I shape, so it's still a square block, but that small bit drifts a little in the wood. It helps if you only drill a little at a time, and clear the bit between each pass. And a sharp bit is real important. But smaller bits wander. At least for me.

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Is the grain lined up top to bottom. If so, this is your problem. Run it side to side next time. This way, the drill passes through the layers, rather than running parallel and getting pushed over. The layers of wood from one grain to the next varies in hardness. The drill will try to take the easy route. I hope that made sense.

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I've been marking the entry/exit holes (six total) first. I then take my cordless drill and drill from top and bottom boring slightly to adjust for the center section. If you use a longer bit that reaches all the way through a 2" bait it tends to flex too much the shorter bits don't.

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I ended up doing the same thing but I was hoping that it might be possible to drill all the way through cleanly.

I might see how small a Forstner bit I can buy as I know that they drill very clean straight holes.

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I ended up doing the same thing but I was hoping that it might be possible to drill all the way through cleanly.

I might see how small a Forstner bit I can buy as I know that they drill very clean straight holes.

I don't think they make forstner bits that small let us know if you find one! are you using diamond or carbide bits?

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I have used a high speed dremel. I think it cuts to fast for wandering to happen at 30,000 rpms. The bit gets hot fast a little at a time works best.

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OK, no one is convinced about my idea. Well that is understandable. It is natural to want to position the grain layers from top to bottom. When the body is shaped, this configuration gives nice curved contour lines, pleasing to the eye, when viewed fron the side. Whereas, if the layers are positioned side to side, all you get is a bunch of parallel lines. Unless you are going for a natural wood finish, all the above is irrelevant, no one will ever see the artistry.

Another arguement for horizontal grain layers is construction strength. The ballast hole would be a lot safer to grill, virtually eliminating splitting.

To prove the point, I found the grainiest piece of nasty wood in my apartment (now a three legged kitchen chair) and the bluntest 1/16th dia drill. I hung it out of the end of my drill and drilled this hole 1.4 inches long.

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Laser Straight!

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V-man your'e on the right track.:yay:

You will still get bit wander as the growth rings are never flat and parallel. Reference your picture and you can see how the rigns arch towards one side.

The key to straight holes is getting the right combination of speed and pressure. Also, as with any tool, buythe best quality you can afford. cheap tools lend themselves to cheap workmanship

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VM - Well put, as you are saying get the grain out of the way or get a timber with no grain-Beech, Maple or something like 'Custom wood' (reconstituted pine chips in sheet) or just burn the holes through, with a hot wire ..............or laser!!! Anybody got a laser yet? OR drill it larger than you want with a forstner bit and fill with epoxy body filler, drill desired hole when set-perfect - It's always easier when you are not doing it???.pete

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