MuskyRuss

Glider into Jointed swimbait

5 posts in this topic

Hi everyone, I need some advice...I going to attempt to make this glide bait into a jointed swimbait/crankbait and see what happens...Ive never made a jointed bait before only gliders and topwaters.

My questions are: 1. The bait is 8" long and 4" tall 3/4 "thick..how far back do you go to make the joint? My thought was half way or 4" 2. Do you still weight the bait the same as a glider putting the weight in front and in the tail but using less weight? 3. Is it better to notch out a section of the tail piece insert a pin through the eyescrews of the head to join the two pieces together?.... or attach two eyescrews together in each section to make your joint? 4. I was also thinking about putting a lip on it to give a wobble action like an SS Shad bait. at what degree would you put the lip and what size lip would one use?.

Do you think this would work on this style of bait or do you think id be wasting my time and effort.

Any information/guidence would be greatly appreicated.

Sincerely, MuskyRuss

This is the style bait I'm attempting to do this to.

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I think it is a shame to cut up a working bait. I would start from scratch, just my opinion. I will leave the rest to the glider and swimbait experts.

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I know this isn't really what you were after, but I agree with Vodkaman. It ain't broke, and doesn't look like it needs fixing. If you want to exhaust your curiosity on a jointed bait, make one from scratch. That's a far better way to learn what you're trying to learn, and allows you considerably more latitude to experiment.

I suspect that you'll also enjoy the process much more, knowing that you don't risk ruining the action and artistry of a beautiful piece of fishing gear-- and you can retain your glide bait as a model to guide your progress.

Good luck, and good fishing!

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I know this isn't really what you were after, but I agree with Vodkaman. It ain't broke, and doesn't look like it needs fixing. If you want to exhaust your curiosity on a jointed bait, make one from scratch. That's a far better way to learn what you're trying to learn, and allows you considerably more latitude to experiment.

I suspect that you'll also enjoy the process much more, knowing that you don't risk ruining the action and artistry of a beautiful piece of fishing gear-- and you can retain your glide bait as a model to guide your progress.

Good luck, and good fishing!

I guess i wasnt clear....Im not going to convert this particular bait....I have several blanks of this bait and i want attempt to convert one into a jointed swim bait and i needed some guidance/ on how to start.

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Fair enough. So in answer to your question, there are no fixed rules as to where to place the joints or the ballast for that matter. But, if you are going to use a lip to drive the action, then it will need to sit in the water slightly nose down.

As for the lip angle, around 70deg if you want it to swim the surface, decreasing the angle to go deeper. Even this is not a hard and fast rule, as you can make a 45 deg lip swim shallow if the lip has a smaller area.

Like developing any new design, be prepared for a period of testing. The sucessful end result will be a combination of lip position, lip angle, lip size, tow eye location, ballast position, etc.

As for the hinge locations, a good place to start would be to scan the photo library and see where everyone else puts the joints.

Rough out a few bodies and accept that these are for testing only, so no fancy paint schemes, just seal them and paint white, for visibility. Go to the lake with lip material, super glue and a few tools, for on site modifications. I bought a battery dremel for the job, excellent!

I've just read what I have written and realise I have not really helped much. I hate saying trial and error, but that is the way it works. What I will say, is that you can cut down on future blind trial and error, by keeping notes of each adjustment, cause and effect. Eventually, you will get a "feel" for the lure. Secondly, only change one parameter at a time, or you won't know which change worked and you will have to repeat the tests.

Good luck with it and let us know of your progress.

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