whibley

Best wood for a popper

13 posts in this topic

WOOHOO!!! FINALLY SOMEONE THAT SPELS LKE ME!!! YOU DA MAN Crimson.. I thought I was the only one that spell big bow day sh us words like Floatant!!! I will get out my Redneck Dictionary and use it in a senctence!!

FLOATANT!!

"Hey Cooter how long you think we been floatant in this here ocean since you blew up the boat!! "

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A question.

Since pine is almost as light as balsa, and much stronger, why wouldn't you use it for poppers?

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If it's the right pine I don't see why not. I asked about pine like 2 weeks ago because its the most common wood in NM. If you get expensive not grainy pine it'll work. You aslo have to let it dry because it absorbs moisture or something like that.

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I think most of the best commercial poppers like Yellow Magics, Splash-Its, etc are made from balsa. Guess it depends on the action you want versus the castability.

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I prefer poplar for my poppers. If maximum buoyancy is a priority for you, then you may prefer a wood with higher floatantential properties than poplar. I llike a popper that sits lower in the water, rather than on top of it, giving it a more natural baitfish presentation; a higher hook-up percentage, for bass, and particularly, stripers in a chop; and that spits and dives a little when I'm walking it. Poplar also takes screws well, and casts nicely in the wind. If you're looking for more of a popping cork type bloop, as for sea trout you may prefer another more buoyant wood, but if your inshore bag contains redfish, again the lower sitting poplar is a much better choice...all other factors being equal, and of course IMO;)

:teef: Dean

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I said this in another forum, "there is no best wood". Even for a lure like a popper it has different action that you are looking for and how it should perform. Target species whether it's toothy or not is another consideration. Best way to go about it for lure making is look for wood that has tight consistent and even grain patterns. Search the web for wood density chart which will give you an idea of its floatantentiallity, some woodworking sites has a lot of info on the workability of a particular wood species too. Then design your weighting around that. So best wood is "builders choice". The fishes will let you know if you've made a bad one ;)

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