mark poulson

color shift paints

18 posts in this topic

mark poulson    1,680

I bought some of the Wildlife color shift paints, but I don't think I'm using the right base for them. I typically spray them over the darker back, and fade down the sides. But I can't see the shift effect in the water.

I remember there was a thread about this, but I can't find the right words to pull it up on the search feature.

Help!!

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Mark.. you have to shoot alot of layers!!! to get the effect you want.. It shows up better on dark backgrounds.. you do not need as many coats over dark to get it to show up.. but you need alot of coats on over white!!! like 8 to 12 LIGHT!! ! I MEAN LIGHT COATS!!!! too many and you milk the color!!

1. Shoot... dry really good.

2. Shoot it again.. Dry really good

3. SHOOt it again... over and over and over!!

Good luck...

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blackjack    7

Color shifting paints are faceted pigment particles that have 2 different colors on adjacent facets. In order to achieve the color change on a flat object the object needs to be in motion. On a rounded object the flop is easier to view because your are actually seeing both sides of the colored facets of the particle. On a flat bait with rounded edges the flop is easily viewed without motion on the rounded sections. Also as stated it is much more noticeable if you build up the paint by spraying several coats. It is necessary to agitate the paint while it is in the airbrush bottle or cup as this type of application is heavily dependant upon the amount of pigment particles that are layed out in each coat!

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senkoman85    10

I have been able to achieve a similar effect, although I would not call it "flip-flop" paint.

I paint a dark color as a base coat and do my pattern. Then, for example, take a Pearlized Copper c-tex paint and water it down. This displaces the pigments and makes them very sparse, then I shoot it in very very very thin coats, usually 3-4 coats. This gives it a copperish look in the water at times, looks awesome.

I do some neat things with it, it's great for minnow immitators, absolutly KILLER on crawfish cranks.

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mark poulson    1,680

Thanks guys.

I couldn't for the life of me remember the phrase "flip flop paint". That's probably why I couldn't find anything in the search. Ya think??? :o)

I'll try a lot of light coats and see if that works.

I'm on my way out to the Garage to paint a jointed swim bait that I'll throw Saturday, so I'll get a real good test then.

Vman, thanks for the link.

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rjbass    1

Mark,

I posted some stuff in the othe thread about Flip Flop paints. I have used Wildlife color paints for a long time. They are correct about layering the coats, but don't expect huge color shifts. The flip flop effect, even when done correctly is very subtle. It does look good on the bait, but truthfully I am not sure if the fish can actually see it or it's for the fisherman......

Rod

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JP MYERS    11

I know you guys like the waterbase paints.. But if you dont mind spraying lacquer, Spaz Stix has 1 oz. bottles of the color changing paints in a few different colors for $8.99... I dont think you'll need to layer 10-12 coats to achieve the desired effect tho.. i had nice results with 1-3 light coats..They also have what they call holographic paints for the same price but i havent played with those yet.. www.spazstix.com

I use his lacquer flouresecent paints regularly as they're airbrush ready & spray much smoother than acrylics.. :twocents:

John~

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senkoman85    10

What are the pro's and con's over spraying laquer paint? I am used to the water based paints...but I am over at spaz stix ordering flip/flop paint by the gallon!!! Not really, but it is being ordered in more then I'll probably use :lol:

Am I able to spray laquer in the same type of set up, or would I need a specialized airbrush? Do the paints require thinning before use?

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JP MYERS    11

Senko, I spray lacquer, enamels, & waterbase, all 3 using the same airbrush.. But you need a respirator with all lacquer & enamels.. Spaz Stix comes ready to use, no thinning required or at least Ive never had to thin it.. One uses lacquer thinner if needed for thinning & definitely for clean-up.. And his flourescent paints I especially like as they cover in one coat.. The waterbase flourescents I've tried all needed several coats which I always find annoying..LoL.. Spaz has a Glow White that really helps as a great base for shift changing & flourescent paints too.. I keep a supply of that to basecoat all my lures, then coat with Testors enamel pearl clear prior to epoxy finish coat..Just remember, you can spray enamel over dried lacquer, but not versa visa unless you seal with enamel clear first!

Good luck,

John~

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mark poulson    1,680

Great site. Thanks.

I use Krylon primer or Minnwax acrylic sealer first to seal my baits, Createx water based paints for finished painting, and Envirotex Lite as a topcoat.

I generally shape, weight, undercoat, and test in one session.

Then I paint and topcoat in one session. That means I'm putting my topcoat on Createx that's been heat set, but not cured out.

Do you think spraying lacquer flip flop paint over a built up waterbased color scheme that's only heat set would be a problem?

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JP MYERS    11

I seal my wood blanks with Spar Urethane, sand, then Spar again..Attach all hardware, swim test & dis-assemble..Prime with Krylon, basecoat white Krylon Fusion & seal with enamel clear.. Then lay down a light coat of Spaz lacquer white..Do the paint scheme, apply pearl clear,shift change, irridescents, or any combo of the three,,, seal with clear enamel again, then D2T as a finish coat..

I do mix & match between enamel,waterbase,& lacquer paints regularly.. But I've never tried putting lacquer paints over waterbased or enamels directly without sealing with enamel clear first..

So I cant answer the question posted as to what reaction might take place by shooting the lacquer directly over waterbase paints.. Hopefully someone else has tried it.

I always seal w/enamel before using the lacquers or use the lacquers first then build enamel and/or waterbased paints over the lacquer.. One things for sure, even with a sealcoat of enamel, if you lay down the lacquer "too wet", it can lift the enamel clearcoat.. But lacquer dries quickly so you can spray it, then wait 1-2 minutes & make your second coat if its needed..

I do quick enamel clear seal coats at different stages during painting of a lure.. That way. if I make a mistake I can just wipe the mistake away with solvent..I spray the basecoat & main colors then seal.. Spray my stencil work(scales,stripes,etc.) then seal.. Spray the final free-hand work, then seal entire lure before epoxy coating..

Now if i could only find someone knowledgable on making 3 section lures similar to the Triple Trout I'd be a happy man!..I have an 8" design here that I cant get to swim right!..Uuuuugh...Maybe its b'cuz I didnt place the tail on yet?..Cant get this Bad Puppy to wiggle at all..I'll test this design again once I get a tail made up..Maybe it'll wiggle like a belly dancer then..Either that or the 3 sections werent divided correctly in length to acheive the wiggle wobble Im looking for..I thought for sure the 3 sections alone would wiggle like crazy w/out the final tail being inserted..Well at least I got it to sit belly down in the water w/no leaning to one side or the other!

John

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SFCBassman    10

Mark, I also paint with different types of paint. I have not used regular createx, but I know that the Auto Air createx does not react with any type of paint, but it must be heat set first. Hope this helps,

Doug

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mark poulson    1,680

I asked about lacquer over water based in case I can't get the effect I want with the water based flip flop paint. I really don't want to fool with solvent based paints. I've already had my share of health problems from chemicals.

So far, I haven't seen any flip flop effect on the lures I painted with it.

Maybe I'm just doing something wrong. I put on three coats over the entire lure.

I had hoped to get the color shift on the darker back, and a scale effect on the sides, but, so far, no success.

Maybe I just need more coats.

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Snax    0

I use some color shifting paints made by auto Air and they work great. The particular one I've used recently is Chameleon Flair Teal/Purple which I used over a dark green base coat. Depending on the light it looks green or purple/blue. They also have some highlight interference paints which add a hue shift depending on the base color underneath.

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Snax    0
Snax,

I just went on you website and saw you work. I'm going out and burn down my Garage!

You're incredible.

Ha ha ha!!! Thanks for the kudos Mark, you just made my day! Honestly there's so much talent here on this website that I'd hardly consider myself special at this point. It's nice to have your work appreciated though so thanks all the same. :)

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