SFCBassman

new paint booth

12 posts in this topic

Well my wife wanted to remodel the garage, so if I wanted to continue to paint in there, I needed a booth. This has actually worked out well for the whole family and I'm glad I did it. This cost me about $80 but I admit, I didn't have to buy the blower motor. I was able to get one made for a ventilation system for a large building (like a booster pump i guess). I did a lot of research on how big the motor needed to be, etc. Thank you Mr. Fatfingers as your pictures and post on here helped me figure this out. The movie on the previous post helped as well.

IM000801small.JPG

IM000803small.JPG

IM000805small.JPG

IM000801small.JPG

IM000803small.JPG

IM000805small.JPG

IM000801small.JPG

IM000803small.JPG

IM000805small.JPG

IM000801small.JPG

IM000803small.JPG

IM000805small.JPG

IM000801small.JPG

IM000803small.JPG

IM000805small.JPG

IM000801small.JPG

IM000803small.JPG

IM000805small.JPG

IM000801small.JPG

IM000803small.JPG

IM000805small.JPG

IM000801small.JPG

IM000803small.JPG

IM000805small.JPG

2695_thumb.attach

2696_thumb.attach

2697_thumb.attach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

couple more pics hope this helps someone. I don't post very often, but I guess this is one of the better things I have done, and I guess I wanted to show people. I use a lot of lacquer, and also a urethane top coat, so this is vital, espicially during the winter. I don't even have to wear my pain in the a** respirator. I can keep my space climate controlled, and actually it helps keep the garage heated. I just keep the door to the house open a bit, and the blower sucks some heated air from the house into the garage.

The square in the bottom is a filter over the hole. This keeps the paint from sticking to the blades of the blower. Thanks to Fatfingers for this little detail. It also has about 6" from the little shelf to the bottom. If you watch the video on the previous post, you will understand why I built this in. It is painted with Kilz, because I know this stuff is pretty resistant to solvent when it is cured. Like my lure turner built in to it? This keeps the vapors out of my garage while curing. Any more questions, I'll be happy to answer. I have been using this for about a month now and I just love it.

IM000806small.JPG

IM000804small.JPG

IM000806small.JPG

IM000804small.JPG

IM000806small.JPG

IM000804small.JPG

IM000806small.JPG

IM000804small.JPG

IM000806small.JPG

IM000804small.JPG

IM000806small.JPG

IM000804small.JPG

IM000806small.JPG

IM000804small.JPG

IM000806small.JPG

IM000804small.JPG

2698_thumb.attach

2699_thumb.attach

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug- love it, you have certainly put some work in here. It's not much point doing it by halves, we are only kidding ourselves (and our lungs). Great work, maybe you could post a tutorial on this!!!

Saying all this I still have not built one, I open the shed door when I rarely spray!! I don't spray lacquers much, but have got some propionate I might give a whirl soon, so better get building. pete

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DOUG that is outstanding man!! I LOVE IT!!! I have been thinkin about making one hope you dont care if I use your pictures to kinda copy it... I love it bud! OUTSTANDING!!!

Matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That thing is sweet. I am looking into building one, and if you don't mind me asking, how much does a set up like that cost?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if anyone wants the full size pictures I would email them to you. send me a pm with your email address. I'll work on a tutorial of sorts, but I did all the research online. use the search feature and look up fatfingers post on his booth. there is a video posted on one of the posts, as well as some calculations you can do. The calculations are on a hobby website that a guy posted.

Here are my main design parameters/lessons learned, for lack of a better term.

1. Downdraft booth requires less CFM. This makes it easier to find a Blower that will move enough air. This means the hole for the suction on the booth is on the bottom.

2. Flexible hose for dryer vents is easier to work with, but the 4" size required a bigger blower (meaning more expensive), so I went with the 6" duct. This is very common and can be found in most hardware stores. In some cases the 6" stuff is cheaper than 5" because it is used more frequently.

3. I wanted my lure turner to be in the booth. I use urethane clear coat and it gives off vapors as it cures. As an added benefit, (didn't know this until I built it) while turning epoxy, it keeps the dust off the baits, especially if I have the fan off.

4. It may not be the right way of doing things, but I just figured dimensions based on the room I had to work with, and I wanted to have enough room to work in, without feeling cramped. The box is roughly 30h" x 24" x 24", and the opening is 24"x24". It wouldn't have to be so high if you didn't include the space for the turner. These dimensions also fit nicely onto one sheet of 4 x 8 sheathing (pressed wood, cheap)

5. I was very careful to make sure I cut so precise, and made all the joints good, I wanted my legs to come out right. One problem was that my garage floor isn't exactly level. I ended up using large lag bolts for my feet. This allowed me to level my booth and eliminate the see saw effect you get on uneven flooring.

6. the design should be based on the velocity of air in the booth opening. The NFPA code requires 100 fpm. I had to look up some tables used for HVAC design to verify the calculations I had already done (see above). Again downdraft booth is easier to achieve this (meaning cheaper).

7. Make sure you glue all joints. This makes a much sturdier booth.

8. the wood cost about $25, ducting about $20, lighting $20. The motor, if I bought it would have been about $30, but shop around, this will be the biggest expense, and you can spend $200 if you require a really big CFM in your design. You should be able to get by with no more than $50 for a motor. Also look for an old one out of a small furnace.

9. I used a power strip on top of the box and plugged the lighting, turning motor, and blower motor to the same strip. This way, I just flip the switch on my strip and I'm in business.

10. I made the shaft of the lure turner removeable. I don't quite know how to explain how to do it, but I wanted to be able to take it out, in case I needed to paint something bigger. I calculated the radius I would need by just putting my biggest lure on it and just measured. I just made sure it would be able to turn around. BTW, I have not had any paint get on any lure I had hanging on the turner. I was concerned about this, but I think I have enough velocity in the air, the paint just goes straight to the hole. This shaft doubles as a hanging rack also. I just use a piece of wire and hook it into the hook hangers. I can even turn something while something is hanging. Cool, huh?

I can't think of anything else right now, but I will try and work on the tutorial. My wife said "people aren't going to want to buy your lures, they are going to want to buy your booth..." I have to admit, I put quite a bit of work into this, not just labor, but trying to figure out everything in advance. Of course it all didn't go exactly as planned, but I'm glad I did the background work.

Thank you for your kind words about my booth. Hopefully I can help someone make their own. I would feel as though I contrubuted to this forum then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doug, I have been considering building some type of paint booth, You just made it a lot easier for me to decide how I wanted to do it. I think downdrafting, is a good idea. Like you, I hate wearing the respirator. The dimensions of your booth would suit my needs well. Any Idea as to how many cfm your blower is? Thanks for posting, that is a great contribution to TU.

John B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a spec sheet on my blower, but I can't find it. If I can remember correctly, it was 180 CFM at 0 Static pressure. Static pressure is basically the pressure you have to overcome due to the friction and losses in the piping. It is referred to as SP when looking up Blowers. The reason I am telling you this is, you have to calculate the effective length of piping you will have. I don't have the charts in front of me, but if I remember correctly a 90 degree angle for a 6" duct is the same as 5 feet of straight duct. Add all this up, and use a chart to come up with the SP rating of your system. For mine I estimated I needed a 150 CFM blower at .3 SP. Have I confused you yet?

Hope this helps, summary, I needed a blower that could blow (or suck in my case) at least 150 CFM at .3 SP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SFCBassman, great work. I can see that you also gave yourself plenty of lighting, which is something I also wanted. I think that lighting is one of the most important features in a paintbooth.

I mounted mine on something similar to this:

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00959304000P?vName=Tools&cName=Garage+%26+Tool+Storage&sName=Mobile+Tool+Cabinets

The cabinet base beneath the booth provide storage and keeps everything within arms reach, which I'm finding I like a lot.

I'm sure that you're glad you took the time to get a booth built. I've been enjoying the painting with mine since deer season was over and it has really made the winter fly nicely.

Again, great job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good idea fingers. I actually upgraded my compressor to a 10 gallon model and it fits nicely under my booth. Although I didn't plan it that way, it certainly works out well. I have a work bench with drawers next to the booth that holds all the "stuff". Thanks to you also. You quite frankly, made it possible for me to do this by posting your pictures. Thanks so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This spring sometime, I'm going to modify mine a bit. I'm going to segregate the blower from the paint booth itself. I'm going to run the hose down through the floor and have the mower completely outside the room in which I paint to eliminate the blower noise.

That way, when I paint, I can actually use my sense of hearing to improve my painting a bit. When I use the Iwata and try to spray very fine mists of paint or try to paint very fine lines, it helps to "listen to the brush" because you can actually hear the paint beginning to be added to the air stream.

Of course, when I'm doing basecoats, I just open up the brush trigger a bit more...and crank up the stereo.:eek::eek::eek::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

I'll also be adding a few lights to the "window" I installed on the top of the booth. You can't have too much light when painting after dark as I usually do. The extra light allows you to be more accurate when doing detail work and it allows you to make your basecoat fades evenly on both sides of the bait. Light is also a big help when spraying pearl powders, which I do a lot.

I'm also going to add a small work table to the shop. I often use a vice to hold the baits while doing detail work. During the application of details I often place the bait or the vice holding the bait on a soft cloth so that I can approach the bait with the airbrush from above. (I know there are many different ways to do this, but that's the easiest way for me). Since I'm spraying only micro amounts of paint during those applications, the exhausting of fumes and particulate is something that I don't worry about affecting other objects in the room and the respirator handles that tiny bit of overspray nicely. For now, I'm just setting the bait on my chair seat and sort of kneeling next to if. A table next to the booth would probably be a bit easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now