Yake Bait

Birdseye Perch

15 posts in this topic

Looking for some ideas to incorporate the maple birdseyes of this lure into the final color scheme. I'm thinking about some real simple color highlights, maybe a thin scale line along the side and be done with it. Any suggestions would be appreciated as I am afraid of messing this one up!

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How about your favorite perch pattern done with translucent paint? Maybe a thin opaque belly to cover the ballast holes, etc....... translucent yellow chartreuse along the lower sides fading to translucent green chartreuse along the upper sides...... a black back that is faded to opaqueness along only the very top..... then a very light scale line done in a semi-transparent gold along the back and top of the sides. That allows the grain and birdseyes to show through while still showing-off the perch pattern, and gives the bait it's dual-character-- 'birdseye perch'.

Good luck, I'm sure whatever you do, it'll look good.

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Don't over-analyze it just because it's a nice piece of wood: Follow your gut on this one Pete, and don't second-guess yourself--With your considerable skills, just make it a bait, and all will be fine. I do see some white pearl working nicely with it, but that's just me :).

Dean

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I've head you can use RIT fabric dyes on wood. I'm not sure if they may fade out over the years much as fabrics do or not.

I would try something like this to allow wood grains to show through tho.

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Too late to dye the wood as I have sealed it in epoxy to preserve the grain. I like the idea of translucent paint. I'm pretty sure that the fluorescent paints are somewhat translucent. The epoxy coat turned out really smooth and if I don't sand it before painting, I can probably wipe off anything I don't like.

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You might try making another of the same wood, wet it to raise the grain, don't sand it, dye it with an alcohol dye from a wood working or paint store, and then see what it looks like. Alcohol dyes are really vivid in their colors.

You may choose to just clear coat it after that, depending on the dye you select.

If you don't like it, you can sand it and redye it, or paint it.

I don't sand to perfection before, or after, I seal my lures. Granted they're big, and mostly reaction baits, but the raised grain, if there's any left, just gives the paint a more 3D look, and the epoxy makes the surface smooth anyway.

I actually have done it and had a friend ask me to leave the grain like that on a lure I was making for him. He said it was a different look that he thought would appeal to fish.

He catches big fish, so maybe it's a good idea.

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Finally got around to painting this one. With the overcast skies today, the birdseyes are kind of hard to see. If I do this again I might skip the belly paint and not worry about hiding the hardware holes. The scales over the 1st clear epoxy coat gave the lure some depth that I typically dont get because I do all my painting in a single layer then epoxy over. Might do this technique on some other paint jobs in the future.

TU Homepage - Luremakers Photo Gallery - "Birdseye Perch"

Had a lot of good suggestions on how to go at this one and I appreciate it.

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Thanks guys,

Mark, the stencil is cut in the same shape as the lure body, I just line it up with the profile of the lure then use one finger to hold it in place and shoot one half, switch position then do the rest. The other thing that is helpful is that I have been staying with the same lure profile for a couple of lures. I used some heavy construction paper for a template, and stencils which can be used multiple times.

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just completely awsome !!!! so much to read here i hadnt noticed this post before..i inlay table tops with wildlife pictures,using different types of wood for the different colors.had a gentleman want a little more greenish tint to one i did of a walleye so i used a transparent stain and diluted it with regular paint thinner to lighten it.really brought out the grain along with a tiny bit of color and it is compatable with epoxy clear coats.at least the woodworking kind.

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Some stain would really help to bring out the grain. The little bit of overspray from the belly paint as well as the additoinal epoxy coats makes it harder to see the fine stuff. Think I will do another with a bit of stain the next time I get a really cool wood grain to work with.

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