blackjack

NITROCELLULOSE Clearcoat

20 posts in this topic

Anyone know anything about this stuff, an oldtimer was telling me about it and said it was the fashizzle!!

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I remember being told it was the old model airplane "dope", but that it was extremely flammable and bad for you, so it was banned from sale in the US. It's still available overseas in some places. I know I've seen it used in British float making and Japanese lure making sites. I hope this helps, but please double check as I might have it wrong.

Clemmy

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See, I already proved myself wrong. It's flammable and toxic, but apparently still available in the US, being used in Gutar finishing apparently from the google I did.

Sorry for the misinfo Craig

Craig

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The old lacquer paints were made with nitrocellouse, hard stuff prone to cracking. Probally not what your looking for in a clearcoat these days. Yes, Fender uses it, however they were required to install state of the art scubbers. Fender used a sealer called fullerplast that was super good for sealing grain but I don't think it is around now days.

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Clemmy is dead on Craig. It is still available and is used on guitars and piano finishes.It is some super hard- super clear stuff.

The toxic and flamability thing doesn'tbother me because I shoot RM Lacquer (which is dang near impossible to get anymore) but I was told by an "old timer" that it doesn't do well with long term exsposure to water and sunlight (and heat). but heck........ were not married to the bait anyway so I would give it a try.Nothing lasts forever anyway.

Regards,

Blades.

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Nitrocellullose lacquer used to be quite common in the British auto and motorcycle industries. My old Triumph Bonnevilles were painted with Nitrocellulose lacquer from the factory (they were also pinstriped by hand). These days Nitro. is the finish of choice for higher end guitars, such as Gibsons and Made-in-America Fenders, because it is the traditional finish, and no industry speaks retro and tradition like the guitar industry. It is very often applied on guitars very thin, both paint and clear, in order to let the wood breathe. That it will rather easily show wear when applied thusly, is considered advantageous as opposed to a disadvantage. Most non-USA guitars are finished in thicker applications of longer-wearing urethanes.

Therefore a good source of Nitrocellulose lacquers these days are guitar repair-type catalogs. Stewart-MacDonald: Everything for building and repairing stringed instruments! carries the Behlen brand of Nitrocell for about $15 a quart, plusthe have compaible sealers,thinner etc. One advantage of the stuff was that it had a bit of flexibility to it that made it somewhat chip resistant compared to some other finishes, back when. I seriously doubt that it could hold a candle to the special automotive clear urethanes etc., available these days. I wouldn't trade a gallon of Dicknite's Topcoat for a 55 gallon drum of it for my use on fishing lures.

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Fender came out with a line of guitars here several years ago made to look like an old worn guitar. I think that was the impetus behind using nitro again. It may have some flex initially however, you can sprayed it on a guitar and rapidly cool and heat repeatedly, it will crack and look old.

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I have some old lures (25yr) I finished in this, and they have cracks everywhere, as opposed to some the same age, done in a clear floor finish, slightly yellowed but still pristine.

KC -maybe the should try some of the crackle finish products around, for instant ageing. pete

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Pete, If they could achieve the same checking with crackle finish I imagine they would give it a go.

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Hate to go off track, but speaking of guitars I have one that is kinda beat up and pretty old received it after my grandfather passed away but I would like to repaint it as a tribute to him.

So I have a couple of questions.

I will be using my airbrush to paint it.

1. What would be a good paint to use on it.

2. What would be a good clear to use.

Thanks for any advice.

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What make of guitar is it?

Painting a guitar with an airbrush would be like painting an airplane hangar with a toothbrush. Get a cheap detail gun!

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Fender and Gibson both market some high end guitars with "reliced" finishes: metal parts are acid-treated to oxidize to a pre-determined patina, plastic parts are aged and yellowed, there is faux wear on the fingerboard, and the finish is cracked and checked also to a pre-determined point, just so some faux player can act like it got that way all those years he was paying his dues on the bar circuits (obviously that is my conclusion, and not the thrust of the marketing by Fender or Gibson). Naturally one pays a premium for this kind of customization. Nitrocellulose actually is good lacquer, as has been my experience with the British bikes and some custom artists I've known. It has also been the finish of choice for many well known stringed instrument companies, many of whom have never used anything else, including some of the better know high-dollar acoustic guitar companies, whose finishes have held up impeccably for many years--also violins, pianos and the afore-mentioned electric guitars.

Dean

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Yes, it will hold up good indoors. But no matter how you slice it and dice it Dean, it is not as good as what is on the market now, nor is it as good as the acrylic lacquer that replaced it.

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I thought that was the stuff they took out of women's thighs and belly after 2 kids and a husband that fishes all the time..So she get back her eye candy look!! and find a new mate!!!

The ROOKIE!!!

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Rookie,

I think that's liquor, not lacquer. At least that's what the stuff women's thighs seem to drive men to.

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Yes, it will hold up good indoors. But no matter how you slice it and dice it Dean, it is not as good as what is on the market now, nor is it as good as the acrylic lacquer that replaced it.

I agree, the automotive urethanes have it all over the old lacquers, although The old Triumphs did well as long as you didn't leave them out in the sun constantly...but there's a few pigments still struggle with that with any carrier. Like I said, I wouldn't trade a 55 gallon drum of it for a gallon of Dicknite's Topcoat, for lures!

Dean

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Well, that is its source...but from very MEAN women only!

Dean

He**, Dean if that were true there wouldn't be anything left of my ex. Wow, imagine the money I would have left over after payday. Oh well, it was only a thought. A guy can dream, can't he????

David

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MaximusGunn,

Therefore a good source of Nitrocellulose lacquers these days are guitar repair-type catalogs. Stewart-MacDonald: Everything for building and repairing stringed instruments! carries the Behlen brand of Nitrocell for about $15 a quart, plus they have compatible sealers,thinner etc.

They also have instruction on painting a guitar. Be aware though, that there are several businesses in this country that do nothing but make new guitars look old!

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