pikester

Cleaning Lexan?

9 posts in this topic

Since I'm new to the lure building scene, I'm having many struggles. The latest is finishing. When top coating my Lexan billed cranks, I always get too much "spill-over" from the lure onto the lip as well as getting the ocasional smudge of Devcon/Etex on different areas of the lips while finishing no matter how careful I try to be:angry:! My main question is can I clean up the extra coating on the lip with acetone, rubbing alcohol, gasoline, etc. without compromising the clarity or colour of the Lexan? Thanks, John.

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Nothing will clean it after it cures. Up to a couple of hours after application, denatured alcohol on a Qtip will clean it without clouding the Lexan (the sooner the better).

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Bob, that's what I was afraid of. I've heard of guys masking the lip but when I tried that, the glue set up & I ended up having to take a razor blade & cut through the Devcon down to the lip to get the tape off! Needless to say, this makes a ragged unclean finish. I'm assuming that if you mask, you need to peel the tape when the top coat is set enough that you dont disturb the finish but not so late that you end up with the mess I decribed?

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Never use acetone on Lexan. It will cloud and score the surface. Alcohol (as previously mentioned) will thin Devcon. You can also buff cured Devcon using plastic polish or jewelers rouge with a buffing disk on a Dremel tool. Devcon can also be wet sanded using up to 1500 grit.

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I install my lips when I top coat with Devcon. I will sometimes put a little tape on the end where it will not contact the clear coat but if I get a little on my finger I will not transfer to the bill. I will put Devcon in the lip slot and a little on the lip. When I push in the lip the extra comes out and I smooth it down the bait. A little around the lip edge is normal for me, but it is fairly seamless and flows in with the rest of the bait.

mossy maker

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If the lip is already compromised. I have sanded it a little then coated the lip with your clear coat. It seames to clear up the lip. Dont go to thick with the clear.

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I don't mask but you should remove masking tape immediately after applying epoxy (something learned from rod building). I just try to be careful when doing an epoxy clearcoat. I want it to fill the crack between the slot and the lip but not to get too much on the lip. I use a flat 1/4" artist's "blending" brush for epoxy so it isn't hard to do. When coating with Dick Nite, I just dip until all the body is covered. That usually means getting some out on the lip but IMO that's necessary and acceptable.

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When I get epoxy on the lip I have found that it looks better if you leave it alone versus tryign to clean it up. The fish care a lot less about it that you and I do.

I have never tried this on lexan, but I know that it works on my wife's formica counter top that I dripped epoxy on one time. Pops right off with a flat razor scraper. Problem is that you may scratch the lip and you are back to my original comment...

I agree with BobP that you want to fill the crack with a bead of epoxy. This not only seals off the area but I think that it adds some reinforcement to the surrounding area.

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A way to avoid such problems is to install the lip last, after the topcoat is fully cured.
With some experience, you can tell how much 5 min. epoxy is needed to glue in the lip, without having too much extra epoxy on the lip. But even the extra epoxy can be removed with care. The real problem which I have is that sometimes removing the unneeded epoxy would move the lip to an unsymetrical position, and you have to move it again to the right position, but then you find that you have too much epoxy on one side, and less than needed on the other.

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