Cuttem Jack

lathe chisels

9 posts in this topic

I just got a lathe for my birthday and do not know which chisels would be best for lure making. I've tried the search function, but came up empty. Can anyone help me out on which ones I should buy? Thanks!

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What size lathe and what size baits will you be making?

I'll bet that a set of Robert Sorby micro chisels will be what you are looking for. (five in the set and worth the price)

You will also need to study up on how to sharpen them, and get the correct items for that. When I did some turning I found that a good strop was needed just as much as good chisels. And learn how to use a stone and what angles you need to sharpen at.

I purchased a couple of Stanley chisels to remove large amounts of wood. I also used a flat head screw driver once just to see if it would work and it did. Then the screwdriver got sucked under and flew right up and hit me in the forehead handle first. It hit just above the goggles. I shut it down and took a break. That was a dumb thing I did. I don't know how it even happened, it was so fast. I bet someone else would have been shutting it down if it had hit me the other direction.

Buy quality tools.

Keep them sharp.

A screwdriver is not a chisel.

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for plugbuilding, I use three chisels 3/4" roughing gouge, 1" OVAL skew, and 1/8" parting tool. for smaller turnings or greater detail get a 3/8" fingernail gouge.

sorby are probably about as good as you will find readily available, but the pinnacle tools from woodcraft are great tools for about half the price.

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I witnessed what happened to Palmetto first hand in high school shop class and the kid was not as lucky. He caught the wrong end and it scared his face for life. Lucky it did not kill him. Do some some reading on it before you dive into turning. They are fun and you will love it, but be safe.

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Thanks for the info. I'm planning on making musky sized lures up to 10 inches long. I've used a lathe when I was in high school making the basics. Bowl, baseball bat and furniture legs, etc. That was awhile ago and just wanted to make sure I got the right chisels for lurebuilding. Thanks again!

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Using quality wood turning tools is very important as they will hold a sharp edge much longer. I would buy only the tools you need as you won't use everything you buy in a set. Also if you are going to be doing alot of turning you should definitely consider a copy crater which makes it alot easer to keep your baits pretty much alike. Keeping your tools sharp is also important. Always remember to keep you tool rest as close to the work as possible to avoid injury. If you don't take the time to keep the tool rest close to your work piece your taking the chance for your tool to grab into the workpiece and kick back. Stroping is very easy to do and keeps your tools very sharp. They also have a power strop that fits into a portable drill or drill press. Just make sure the wheel is turning away from the cutting edge. With very little practice you will get good at this. When you first start out its a good idea to put magic marker on the tool and lightly strop it. Then look at the tool to see if your angle is right. Always use extreme caution as it easier to avoid injury and always wear eye protection. Its a good idea to wear a dust mask also. I have been sharpening saws and tools for over 30+ years and a good sharp tool is the safest and easiest to use. If I can be of any help please feel free to ask any questions or pm me. Thanks and Happy Turning. Ken

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I use Pinnacle, very good tools and reasonably priced.

AN oval skew 1" or more plus a roughing gouge is a good start.

I would start with these and learn how to use the skew right.

Videos or a class on use and sharpening helped me.

Tim

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Cettem Jack,

There is a tutorial titled Basic Wood Lathe Tips by redg8r that is pretty good and will get you through the basics. Happy Birthday, I thought I still had a few days.

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Years ago, I bought a 24" lathe, no motor or stand, at a swap meet.

It had a threaded shaft on the outside end of the head stock, actually an extension of the main drive shaft.

I bolted a green stone (carbide sharpening wheel) to the lathe, so it is always on when I turn. That way, I can touch up a tool the minute it seems to be dulling, and the super fine/soft grit of the wheel makes overheating the tools very unlikely. The wheels wear out faster because they're soft, but they put a fine edge on tools without overheating.

If I really have to reshape a tool after I've touched it up repeatedly, I take it over to my regular grinding wheels, and spend some time doing it right.

Sharp tools are the best insurance against accitents. No body armor is going to keep a cheisel that flips back up at you from doing some serious harm.

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