philB

Rubber tipped brushes

13 posts in this topic

The application of Epoxy finishes has always been troublesome with brushes wether stiff or soft. The bristles invariably come out into the finish and once used are best thrown away because one can never guarantee it has been cleaned properly.

Are the brushes in the link the answer ??? and has anyone here used them ??

Wide Colour Shapers - BLICK art materials

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philB,

I use cheap artist's brushes, the ones with the 8" yellow plastic handle. I bought a dozen a year ago, and am still using the first two, one for water based paints like Createx, and the other for Etex and D2T epoxy. The bristles are locked in the handle. I may have gotten a couple of loose bristles when I first started using the epoxy brush, but that was a long time ago. As I said, I've used the same one for about a year, and clean it well with alcohol after each use, and it's still going strong. And it spreads epoxy great.

I bought the brushes at a local hobby shop.

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Phil - looks like we may be doing some shopping when we get there ???. for what it's worth, I use acid brushes now, and chuck them away. pete

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Mark

I have used brushes over and over but found I could not clean them 100% only 99 and I was using so much alcohol it was cheaper to just sling em and use a new one every time, the brushes are cheaper than the alcohol :huh:. It seemed to me the rubber brushes would be real easy to clean.

Pete

I am sure there will be plenty of shopping done :). You'll have to tell me what an acid brush is when I see you.

Thanks for your replies

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First time in my life that I see rubber brushes, but I would not trust them to apply epoxy with.

I use cheap brushes, which I clean with thinner, (very little at a time) and I think that I can clean the brush perfectly each time. The only thing which stops me using the same brush over a year or more, is that many times I simply forget to clean it, being too busy with rotating the lures, heating the topcoat to get the bubbles out, etc.

I wanted to approximate the cost of using such a brush just once, compared to the cost of the thinner I use, but I could not find the time for such a calculation.

Someone said that a cheap brush can be improved, so as to not leave bristles in your work, by clamping with pliers (or in a small vise) at the base of the bristles. It works for me.

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Someone said that a cheap brush can be improved, so as to not leave bristles in your work, by clamping with pliers (or in a small vise) at the base of the bristles. It works for me.

Or add a drop of supper glue to the brush at the base before pinching it. not to much just enough the hold the hair.

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Phil- They are hard to find here too, but stumbled upon them in a hobby shop (electric cars choppers etc), 10 cost about $4. Fatfingers had a good source over there , same brushes, by the 100, cost about 8c each. I contacted them and they would not send them over here. It's amazing that we have to travel 12,000miles to buy a cheap paint brush???

pete

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I should start a shopping service for all the guys that can't find stuff or can't get it shipped to their part of the world. Think this would fly?

TJ

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Basseducer - I am sure I could find most things here, but cost is the big downer - I finally sourced D2T here, but had to buy it from a hobby shop in Perth, 2500 miles away, and it costs about $12 for a syringe - I think by the time you got it here it would cost the same. The company that makes D2T also owns 'Selleys', who make the equivalent here (called Araldite), but it is not the same, it's the old yellow epoxy- eventually, I suspect they will come out with a 30 min clear soon, as 5 min clear has been available for a while.

All this is the same for paints etc, you just have to search - for paint, I just buy tubes of good artists acrylic and thin it - could not be bothered paying big money for 'The right Stuff', when usually it, at best, is artists acrylic in a bottle, with water added - half the pigment @ four times the price. If the acrylic in paintings last for 100 years, I expect the paint on my lures to last that long too (not so for the lure body).

Sorry, but you got me on my rant, I hate paying big $, for big names which turn out, at best to be just standard products, with flash labels and lots of advertising/endorsements. pete

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Phil,

Just to answer your question; what is an acid brush? It is the type of brush a plumber would use to put flux on a copper pipe before soldering them together. Here's a link to let you see 'em. See you this weekend!

P Series All Horsehair, Tin Handle Acid Brushes

Hi Bruce

Ironic or what, I am a plumber by trade :), funny regional differences in descriptions here but they have always been flux brushes in the UK, it is a good few years since I got my hands dirty, I'm still in the business but now I tell other guys what to do and where to go. What made me think the rubber one's would be ok was a post somewhere in the past where he said he applied epoxy with an old credit card.

Looking forward to meeting everyone :)

Edited by philB

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