.dsaavedra.

Turning D2T

11 posts in this topic

I would say it would depend on how much you have thinned it, but in most cases it should work. In fact after thinking about it will work no matter how much you tin it.

Edited by MTfishingrods

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It might be too slow. Then again, the temperature of your workspace determines the hardening and curing rate of the epoxy, so if you find its too slow and the epoxy of gloopy, then take it outside if its chilly. If not, a new motor may be needed.

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I think 1 rpm is less than needed (to be on the safe side), not only with thinned epoxy, but with unthinned one as well, in case you apply too much epoxy on the lure. I use a microwave motor, with 5 rpm, but I also used a microwave motor with 15 rpm (that one is dead now), and had no problems at all with such a "high" speed. I remember that some people use a cordless drill to rotate lures, at 60 rpm or more. No problems reported yet.

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60rpm, even as much as 120rpm is OK as long as the lure lies on the axis of rotation, in other words, you can only turn one at a time. If you applied these speeds to a wheel, you will epoxy the ceiling.

Over many posts we have established that the slightly higher speeds still work, so what IS the slowest speed? I hope you build it and report back.

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Vman, I can guarantee that 5 rpm works well, and that 15 rpm works also well. I assume every speed in between would also work well.

But these 2 limits refer to the wheel I have, made out of 2 CDs. The bigger the wheel, the higher the peripherical speed will be, and so the higher chanses for you to epoxy the ceiling.

I think a smaller wheel is better than a big one, because it can rotate the lures at a higher speed (as needed to rotate continuously the position of the lure, on a tail to head axis) but you can eliminate the risk of epoxy wanting to jump to the ceiling.

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Clear-coating the ceiling sounds like a great idea...but first a little foil around the light fixtures, a few scales and stripes...

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Clear-coating the ceiling sounds like a great idea...but first a little foil around the light fixtures, a few scales and stripes...

FF,

Would you recommend stencils too? :lol:

Seriously, I have a 1 rpm rotisserie motor on my wheel, which is a pair of 14" diameter plywood discs mounted on the rotisserie shaft, so the lures are suspended between the discs. The actual speed that the lures move is compounded by the distance they are from the center of the shaft (Vodkaman, help me out here).

I use Envirotex Lite, and, as long as I don't put too much on (which I learned the hard way), it doesn't sag while turning.

Again, the actual speed the lure is moving depends on where on the disc I mount it.

I have two concentric rings of eye bolts, 4 per ring, one ring has a 4" radius, and the other is a 6" radius. I divided each disk into eight pie shaped sections, and put the eye bolts on alternating sections, so no one lure is directly below the other, and I can coat them on the wheel.

In practice I've found coating inner lures when the outer ring is full of four lures is a pain, so I mostly use the outer ring. So much for my genius idea. But, in a pinch, it works.

And I've found no difference in the epoxy coats from either ring. But I do try to balance the load on the discs, to make life easier on the little motor.

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Yes, it is not just the speed, but also the distance of the lure from the rotation axis. I was trying hard not to go there, but it is important.

The danger is that if you spin the wheel too fast, the epoxy will flow outwards due to centrifugal forces. This is the critical speed that needs to be addressed. The slowest speed that works is determined by how often you want the lure turned over. I have read in these pages that some turn the lure over every five minutes. This would be the equivalent of 1 rev every 10 minutes.

To establish the high end speed, lengths of cotton could be hung at the lure position. Spin the wheel until the cotton starts to be thrown outwards, indicating centrifugal forces. Knock the speed back a few notches and you have the max speed. But why mess about, just rig it up quick and spin one or two and closely examine the result.

My point is that the range of revolution speeds for a successful wheel is a lot wider than we think.

Edited by Vodkaman

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DSV

My set up is very similar to what Mark has and works fine at 1RPM. The key is to not put the epoxy on too thick.

Bruce

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