LURE JUNKIE

Topwater question

15 posts in this topic

I'm Looking at making some globe and tallywacker style topwater lures. I've got the props and rivets and want to get started.

My question is, after you drill the hole for your wire to go through the body, how do you seal the wood where the wire goes through? I plan on epoxing the rivets in, but water must still get in between the wire and the rivet. I tried searching but didnt find much on these styles of lures.

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Hi , LURE JUNKIE ,

I have made a couple of such lures through the years , local pike don't seem to like them a lot , but a Dutch friend got a 51" pike on one of my bait in the Netherlands .

Anyway , I rig these lures as follows :

I drill the hole for the wireshaft from either side of the lureblank's rear portion , to meet in the middle of it .

It's got to be accurate work , also this way I avoid the hole to exit out of center on one end .

When the bore for shaft is completed , I'd extend it on the front end , just for the bearing rivet to fit in . The rear end I'd also extend for the wireshaft closure coils to fit in snugly .

(NOTICE : I utilize straight wire shafts , furnish the rear eyelet on it myself , the closure coils around the shaft I don't wrap coil against coil , but I would leave some space inbetween , so that later the epoxy glue finds better grip , make that coil at least 1/2" long .)

The belly eyelet I'd make out of little thinner wire(easier bending , less diameter hole required) , make a smaller closure loop on one end for the wireshaft to pass through , on the other end I furnish the little larger hook eyelet , 90

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@ LURE JUNKIE

ooops , I forgot , the describtion below only stands for "Globe" lures , "Tallywhackers" I rig a little different , you may request a describtion for these as well . Don't have time for it right now , got a date .

diemai

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Diemay. That glue technique, sucking to draw it into the hole, is a great idea.

Reads like a well thought out technique. You could add a bunch of photo's to make it easier to explain.

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@ Vodkaman

I would if I could , but I'm sorry to say that I am quite dump about computers , got one for the first time in mid-January and I am happy to have gotten so far as I am now .

In other words , I don't know how to upload single pictures here in the forum and especially not how to upload entire files with multiple pics plus text:(:(:huh::huh: .

So far as I am concerned , one must first submit the pics to a service site and then write the link to it here, but I have never bothered so far finding out about it .

On the German counterpart site to TU , KoederDesign.de - alles f

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Diemai, I'll be honest with you, and I will tell you that I have an interest to see more of your lures, because I think you have lots of imagination in designing lures.

Here are some things for you to read:

http://www.tackleunderground.com/forum/hard-baits/11292-uploading-multiple-pictures.html

http://www.tackleunderground.com/forum/site-usage-instruction/5183-inserting-photos-into-forum-posts.html

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@ rofish

Thanks a lot , it's true , I really like to fool around with always new and different designs , whereas I don't bother too much about elaborate color patterns and paint jobs , though I really admire those and the skilled people , that work them out .

Also thanks for the links , I'll check these out tonight after work !

Greetings , diemai

Edited by diemai
extension of text

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If I were making a through wire lure, I'd either soak it in a very low viscosity sealer, like a wood preservative, after I'd done all the drilling, or I'd split the blank in half, either before or after shaping, and groove for the wires. Then I'd be able to set the wire rig in and glue it completely when I glue the halves back together.

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I also soak all of my lure-blanks in a wood preservative for added protection .

Pinewood , beechwood and others I'd dip into it briefly and let dry for one day , than repeat and dry thoroughly for two to three days before adding hardware and applying first paint coats .

Only abachewood blanks are suited for another method to render the wood not vulnerable to water sepage :

Take some old forage glas-jars(marmalade , sausages , etc .) and make up a mixture of boiled linseed oil and turpentine(paint-thinner , no genuine stuff neccesssary) , in equal shares(50/50) .

Put your abache-blanks into the liquid and soak for three to five days , they would float up in the jar , so fill it up to the rim and close up with its top tightly to have them entirely covered with the sealer liquid .

Fill up the jar with new sealer liquid after one day , also check its level in the jar the second day , since it goes down a bit , because the stuff enters into the wood .

After the soaking is done , dry the blanks in a well-ventilated place(it's a bit smelly , but I don't find that linseedoil-smell disgusting) , this takes two to three weeks . During this time the turpentine thinner would evaporate , leaving only the oil in the wood , also rendering it a bit more rigid and slightly heavier .

The blanks are OK , when the don't smell a single bit of the liquid anymore .

This metod is only suitable for abachewood , tried in on other woods as well , pinewood cracked up after the treatment , limewood lost too much of its buoancy , etc.... :(.

I also soak and dip lureblanks , that have been glued together with waterproof wood glue previously , the treatment does not seem to harm that bond .

WARNING :

The linseedoil treatment protects your abache-lure for its entire lifetime , but in some cases it can happen after a year or two , that it tarnishes brighter paints and/or brown spots appear under the topcoating :(.

I haven't yet found out , why this happens , I assume , that it has to do with the wood grain and density , because it does not happen to every lure .

Also it may be , that my paints(rattle cans , modelmaking enamels)are also subject to this tarnishing , maybe acrylic paints are not , I can't tell , because I haven't used such yet .

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Frenchy LeMay used brass tubing for his handmade thru-wires...a bunch of heavy Chippewa Flowage muskies will attest that "brass kicks azs!"

Cut the tubing a little longer than its final length, and of course stop up the ends while using it as a tool to distribute your glue. After your glue sets, trim and smooth the ends.

Dean

Bruce, the link wouldn't work for me.

Edited by Dean McClain

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I thru drill almost all my plugs (some smaller oddball stuff I am using screw eyes) on a lathe. For sealing, I soak the wood bodies in a mixture of val-oil/mineral spirits mixed about 60/40. Warm the blanks first to get better penetration. This will seal the wood in the thru hole and belly hole. I typically use a swivel in the belly hole rather than a hanger, so the thru hole and belly hole remain open. Let the bodies sit and cure for a couple of days, then proceed with primer, paint, topcoat and hardware (in your preferred order).

The last couple of batches that I have done, I also brushed on a couple of coats of devcon thinned with acetone. I do this after the oil mixture has cured. This gives the plug a harder, more durable, exterior surface and also is easier to clean up my paint screwups.

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Just an idea, and maybe someone out there has tried it, what about soaking or applying liberal amounts of thinned out etex to the blank?

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"Frenchy LeMay used brass tubing for his handmade thru-wires...a bunch of heavy Chippewa Flowage muskies will attest that "brass kicks azs!""

Using brass tubing thru the head of a globe is best. You can experiment with both round and square tubing to get different sounds. Same for the tail section on a tallywacker style bait.

And to follow Frenchy's techniques one step further you can solder the wire shaft to the rivets in the main body so it wont spin. It also seals off the main shaft hole so no water can enter.

I even use brass tubing in the holes I drill for the belly hooks on my topwater baits to help seal it a bit better.

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