jtibill

Commercial Hard Baits

7 posts in this topic

Which material is the most widely used to make commercial hard baits like crank baits and stick baits?

Thanks,

Bill

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I would think it's some kind of a foam. It's by far the cheapest, easiest way to mass produce exact copies of lures, time after time.

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swede has stated it.. definately easier on production tooling also

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I think , that the biggest share of commercial crankbaits is made of plastic , though I don't know the exact plastic kind and name .

They are glued or welded(in a special technical process)together of two halves , previously steel shot and wire forms set in .

Well-known products of this kind are the crankbaits from the "Mann's" line .

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I think , that the biggest share of commercial crankbaits is made of plastic , though I don't know the exact plastic kind and name .

They are glued or welded(in a special technical process)together of two halves , previously steel shot and wire forms set in .

Well-known products of this kind are the crankbaits from the "Mann's" line .

I agree. I should have said plastic instead of foam, but.......

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Commercial wooden lures are seemingly in minority against commercial plastic baits , so far , so good !

But by reading over Swede's statement again , it came into my mind , that there might probably be a difference in terms of the wood used for lures between American and European manufacturers .

I read many describtions inside lure catalogs , therefore I can tell , that the Finnish "Nils Master" line is made of abachewood , also the Finnish "Turus Ukko" lures , the famous , also Finnish , "Rapala"(wooden)lures are made of balsawood .

On the other hand , American-made wooden commercials(sorry , can't think of model names right now)are stated to be made of cedar or basswood , sometimes pinewood or maple , smaller baits of course of balsa , too .

These woods , except balsawood , you hardly find used for European commercial lures , as far as I am concerned.

I guess , this fact has to do with traditions and also easy access to those materials locally .

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