meallenjr

cnc

13 posts in this topic

Ed Chambers uses one to make the Zoom crankbaits. Some of his baits look like many older designs. From what I hear, he doesn't copy designs without either buying the design and rights from the original maker, or getting permission from the right people.

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I don't know if your wanting CNC or a duplicating machine. There are several members, hazmail, nathan, redg8r, to name a few that have put a fair amount of effort into duplicating their ordinal baits with the goal of creating high end copies to sell. Once most folks realize your going to need to learn software and a programing language to use CNC, they tend to drop the idea. A duplicating machine, on the other hand, can make a copy of the original without all the programing... the duplicating machine design needs to carefully considered in order to develop one to meet your requirements. Good luck.

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most cnc machines require you to be able to write the program in g code which will take considerable time and the cnc is not as fast as a duplicator a duplicator can cut a crankbait body in about 60 - 90 seconds just depending on how smooth you want the body the slower it cuts the smoother the body but like bruce said there is alot of thought that goes into the design and into building the final product and be prepared to fork out some major bucks for some precise machine work it will take alot of machine work to keep things precise and in alignment to keep from cutting one end of the body smaller or larger than the original what this meens is if its out of alignment it will cut the front larger or smaller than the original or the tail larger or smaller i know this from experience the cnc machine will however come in handy to cut out flat bodies but imo they are to slow to cut out round bodies thats where a duplicator will be your best bet

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I heard Bagley went to CNC when the moved production to Hondrus. The baits are prototyped in the US and cut out on a small CNC machine then tested. The production machines are large fast machines that cut the baits as two separate halves which are glued together later. This requires cutting in only three axis.

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You might check with either Sears or Rockler, they both carry computer controlled carvers. I'm not sure how complex the programming is. BTW, What type of bait do wish to duplicate?

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bugn those machines are called a compucarve they are very slow and very loud and only cut three axis and the crankbait has to be made in two parts and glued together

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Small table top CNC mills, as far as I know, only come in 3 axis machines. Even if they did make a 5 axis machine, it would be cost prohibitive. As mentioned above in a couple of places, you are limited to cutting two halves and gluing together. Also, speed is an issue, these machines are not as fast as you might expect, they are not going to spit out 30 bodies per hour.

The best application for such a machine, again as stated above, is for machining master bodies, used for creating RTV molds. In between new projects, the machine could be put to work cutting lip profiles. I looked into CNC quite closely and these are the conclusions that I arrived at and decided to place the idea on the back burner, for future re-consideration.

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Ok I have a stupid question.. why would you want a CNC machine if you could use the other kind and not do any fancy programming.... Just curious..

The Rookie

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If you use CAD, many systems can convert the CAD model directly into a form that can be used by standard CNC machines. I haven't used it on a job, but have had a play with the feature. It will even replay the cutter path and create a model with the cutter marks, so you can see what you are getting.

Typing in G code is do-able, but an unrealistic proposition with thousands of entries to be made. I am on the edge of what I know on this subject, so jump in if I am misleading people.

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