WyldOne

Eyelets

31 posts in this topic

Here is the skinny..............

Water resistance means water will bead up on it and be shed like a waxed car. However, the material is water soluble and will eventually break down.

Water proof means the coating is not water soluble, therfore not breaking down from exposure.

...oh....and another thing.....

Water proof doesnt mean water proof in all circumstances. According to some astm specs, water proof can mean many different things. You would need the spec number that the epoxy company claims to be in compliance with to really tell.

For example, one spec that I know of for a seal material claims water proofness to a depth of 10 meters in 70 f. mineral free water. (I work for a medical device manufacturer). This is probably not usefull info but may help you win on Jeapordy.........

Sonny

Edited by Sonny.Barile

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rofish,

I wish the industry would be more uniform in it's wording and descriptions, without having to resort to ASTM specs. I spent fifteen minutes reading all the specs. on all the glues that Home Depot had on their rack, trying to figure out which was truly waterproof. I finally figured out that ASTM 1 was the most waterproof rating, but the others were still called waterproof.

Confusing, like being a little pregnant, don't you think? After all, to me, either a glue is waterproof, in which case you can immerse it in water and never have a failure, or it's not.

But, then again, what do I know? :nuhuh:

Mark

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Being a little pregnant would also mean that the respective person would give a little bit of birth?:?

To me, things are clearer now. What we have to learn out of this thread, thanks to Mark, is that 2ton epoxy is reliable for crank makers while 5 min. Devcon (and I assume it goes for other brands of 5 min. epoxy as well) might be good, or might be not.

5 min. Devcon will fail over time, if immersed in water. But for how long? Days, months, years? And do you keep your lures immersed for days when you go fishing? After a fishing day, they have the chance to dry.

I think it would be interesting to find out if the specs for the 2 ton epoxy will change in the official site of the producer, after Mark has shown them a confusing aspect.

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The problem will only arise if the protective topcoat is breached and water gets inside AND the lures are not air dried out before storing for the next trip (You'll have to write instructions to insert with the lures that you give away or sell)(do people actually return freebees if they get a problem!). This assumes that you are not using '5min' for a top coat, for which it is not recommended because it yellows with time (UV light problem I think).

But the worst thing you could possibly do, in light of this whole discussion, would be to leave your lure sitting in the sun, on a rock, to dry out. That is guaranteed to break the seal and let water in next time you use it. I think someone mentioned this not long ago, so sorry for the dplication, but well worth mentioning.

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Yeah.....the UV thing is a whole other learning experience......lol

Interesting note: I went to Lowes today and saw a loctite product labeled 50 minute epoxy.....and it said it would be "water-proof" if cured more than 24 hours.

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