DanCampbell

Hello

10 posts in this topic

Hi All,

This is my first post and I would like to start off by saying I really like this site. I have been looking for a hobby for a while and I want to try my hand at lure making. I am reading through posts in an attempt to choose the correct tools. I want to start with top water plugs and poppers.

I look forward to reading through the information you all have posted.

Take care

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to TU,

I think you have chosen a good hobby and found the right place to get all the information you would ever need.

A very important step in getting started is choosing the correct wood. There is a lot of information on here about lures and the things needed but not very much about the woods to start with. Make sure you choose a wood that is strong enough for the fish you will be fishing for, or one that can be made strong enough for the fish you make them for. If you use a wood that is too heavy you will not be able to achieve the desired action and castability you might want in a topwater bait. Make sure you get wood that is kiln dried or at least has a very low moisture content.

You talked about the tools needed, and that will all depend on the type of wood you will be making plugs out of.

Tell us a little about your location and the type of fish you like to fish for and there will be a lot of members that willing to offer advice whenever you need it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to TU dan.

This thread is a good start for tools required:

http://www.tackleunderground.com/forum/hard-baits/13262-tools-tools-more-tools.html

But to start with, apart from simple hand tools, you should invest in a Dremel drill. They are not the cheapest drill on the market, but I hope you learn from my experience, cheap drills are very expensive. You will burn out the first one half way through your second body. You will then step up a few dollars, but within a month you'll be shopping for a Dremel.

I bought a cordless, as I wanted to do waters edge adjustments to lips etc. I've had it a year and it is going strong. But just cutting one balsa body is enough to drain the battery. So a regular corded Dremel and a bunch of assorted bits is my advice for your first purchase.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for

I live in northern VA and like to fish for bass in lakes around the Culpeper area, I just found a quiet little spot called Crockett park with a pretty lake.

I have a dremel tool, I also have a Grizzly mini lathe on order. What I do need to learn about is airbrushes and compressors. I don't mind spending money on good equipment but I want what others have used with good results.

I really thank you for the advice and information you gus post.

Thanks a lot.

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's some airbrush links to start you off. This list is just a sample of the information available here:

http://www.tackleunderground.com/forum/hard-baits/12085-quick-painting-question.html

http://www.tackleunderground.com/forum/hard-baits/10515-airbrush-prices.html

http://www.tackleunderground.com/forum/hard-baits/8852-airbrush.html

http://www.tackleunderground.com/forum/hard-baits/8446-air-brush-recommendations.html

The secret is to find the key words and then search on them. Multiple word searches will get the list down to something specific. I found the above by searching - iwata paasche compressor.

There is another ton of info on compressors, as it comes up quite often. Try - compressor quiet trap regulator - these words in various combinations should get you some useful bed time reading.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a good topic on lathe chisels.

http://www.tackleunderground.com/forum/hard-baits/13069-lathe-chisels.html

Let some of the other guys give some direction on types of wood to use with a lathe.

Here is the wood lathe tips tutorial that Redg8r.

http://www.tackleunderground.com/forum/hardbait-how/5188-kb-basic-wood-lathe-tips.html Click the PDF file attached.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That sounds great,

I will read through the links and start thinking about an airbrush.

I was holding off on buying any painting equipment until I turn out a good lure shape, I have never used a lathe and will have to buy a book or take a class to get the in's and out's down pat. I plan to use eastern red cedar for my top water lures but I will rip some 2X4's to practice with.

White pine is pretty cheap.

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just don't get the brilliant idea to use pressure treated wood for you lures. The fumes are deadly, and the fine dust from sanding is bad for you, too.

Sharp tools are the key to successful, and, more importantly, safe turning.

A dull cheisel will grab in the wood and flip back at you faster than the speed of light.

Lathe cheisels do not make good forehead ornaments.

Read the tutorials, and go slow. You'll get the hang of it in no time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the advice, I will only use untreated wood.

I have a table saw that I am using to rip the boards with but I think I need a fine toothed blade to get the cuts looking better. I will check it out.

Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That table saw will come in handy if (when) you decide to start making crankbaits wiith Lexan bill, you might want to read the tutorials by hazmail in the Member Submitted Tutorals, Hardbait How To section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now