jimmie7915

lacquer question

13 posts in this topic

Hello again guys.I am thinking of switchung over to the lacquer paint and was wandering if anyone here would mind pointing me in the right direction as to where to get some from. I found some at a taxidermy place but I really like the mettallics and the color shifting paints . I appreciate the help and thanks again!

Jimmie

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we use lacquer based in canada. try a paint maufacturer or your local auto body shop. its slowly being phased out insome areas.. for production runs its very cost effective

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Woodie thanks alot! I tried the loal automotive paint shop and I can get it there.The only problem is, is it's $62 a pint and thats the smallest amount I can buy there. I was hoping to find some a little cheaper than that!

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wow we buy basic colors greens, yellows, blacks its only 10 dollars a quart. gallons are 34 dollars. im in canada though.

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Where do you live Jim, sounds like the same price as here (Aus), It's a bloody scandal what they can charge and get away with it- we pay $12.60 for a syringe of D2T here, I send to Perth (2000 miles away) for it, I could probably get it in cheaper from US, 14000 miles away. pete,

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I purchased a clearcoat lacquer (DupliColor I think) from Auto Zone or one of those. I used it to mix my own colors and it thins great with Lacquer Thinner or Acetone. The quart can dost about $20 and if you just mix an ounce or two of the basic colors it will paint a lot of baits. Colorant/pigment for the paints was found at a large specialty paint shop (not automotive specialty but like industrial) and they gave me one or two ounces of each basic color pigment for free. They are the experts so just ask if they have colorant in the back that is compatible with lacquer or solvents. Then if you need the pearl pigments the ones that are sold on the auction site for automotive paints work great. They sell 25g bags of powder pearl or shifter pigments and they shoot through an airbrush with no problem. A 25 gram bag of powder pigment will mix about a half gallon of paint.

I went and checked the can. It is DupliColor BSP300 Clear Coat.

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Thanks again everyone I will check the pigments out and see what I can come up with. Haz, to answer your question I am in the states in Ohio.I was looking at some automotive mettallic paint so I am guessing that is why the cost is high!

Jimmie

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has anyone tried lacquer paint on small jigheads? I was thinking about dipping them one at a time. the heads are oval shaped 1/16 oz. for tying calftail hair. The jigs I like the looks of, have a transparent like thinned look for the color coat. I was thinking it could be lacquer. Anyway does anyone have another source other than auto zone? I like the thought of buying clear lacquer, and having multiple pigments on hand to create the shade I want. Sources for lacquer and pigments, is what I'm interested in I guess. I have tried powder and vinyl, but still like the looks of a little transparency.

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You have to watch it when you use lacquer on jig heads that contact plastic, it will react and give you a nice gooey mess.

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This evening I found quarts of clear lacquer at Home Depot. 9.99 and made by minwax. They are in a black can. The solvent based pigment paste I have, works great with it. I thinned it a little and added a little extra pigment and it seems to be working great. Before I dipped them in the lacquer, I dipped them in bare metal primer that I sprayed out of a can.

I have not tested it with soft plastics yet.

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Hi

In the UK what you term 'Laquer' I believe is 'Cellulose', I use what we call 2K paints as cellulose products are phased out now here however we can still buy cellulose thinners (virgin thinners) and this is how stupid it is I can buy a 2k 'convertor' which converts the 2k back to cellulose :eek:. 2k paints need the addition of a hardner so they are a 2 part paint whereas cellulose paints do not.

Beware !!!! cellulose paints are toxic in many ways not only from inhalation but they are highly flamable so precautions are needed before use plus as bassn1 says they are a solvent base so will do serious harm to certain plastics. That concludes the downside of 'Laquers', here is the upside, they shoot beautifully through the smallest nozzel and dry almost instantly so paint jobs are very quick. The pigments in the paint are the best you will ever get and you rarely have to put several coats on to get the required coverage. You can also make a 'Laquer' transparent by using a laquer base which is what the paint is made of before the pigment is added. A lot of members here have serious concerns over the health implications of laquer paints and rightly so but if you take the required steps there should not be a problem, do not skimp on the respirator, buy a good one with the corect cartridge for use with solvents.

'Laquers' 'Cellulose' whatever you want to term them get a thumbs up from me :yay: and you should be able to get hold of them without too much trouble at a reasonable cost although I have to say they are expensive but they do go a long long way because when you buy them they are very thick and you will be thinning at least 60/40, 60 being thinners 40 being paint and most of the time even more.

As a footnote if laquers are used forget topcoats with a solvent base as they will dissolve your paint job. There are no better paints for the special effects you mention and whatever you see in the motor industry will be available to you.

Edited by philB

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The old lacquers are nitro-cellulose and newer lacquers are acrylic. The nitro stuff is harder but more prone to crazing and cracking. The nitro is still used, but not to the degree it once was

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