joshuaclayton

Iawata HP-C Mac Valve Air Hose

11 posts in this topic

Ive finally descided to get the HP-C with the Mac valve and since i already have a shop compressor I was wondering what kind of connection from the gun to the shop compressor would i need in order to still use the compressor for other chores :cry: and i keep hearing about regulators Im not dumbstruck can someone help me.

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I don't know what your mainline pressure from you compressor is. But most are in the range of 90-110 regulated. I wouldn't subject the airbrush to that much pressure. I would get a inexpensive regulator and take off from the mainline, and set this regulator to the upper limit you would use to airbrush 50-60.

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Sounds like you may want either a manifold or a quick disconnect so you can attach more than one tool or change tools more easily. For the airbrush, an adjustable pressure regulator with gauge is about $20 at home centers, likewise a moisture trap. I don't think anyone can say what adapters you need; that depends on your specific configuration. But most home centers also carry the necessary adapters. I recommend Teflon plumber's tape on all connections. Most Iwata brushes have a recommended max pressure of around 45 psi. I haven't heard of damaging an airbrush with higher pressure (some guys use up to 60 psi) but I use 40 psi max with my Iwatas. You can dial that in on your pressure regulator and use the MAC valve on your airbrush to fine tune the air you need for various paint shots. JMHO, if the compressor is handy at the bench where you can easily adjust its regulator, there's not much need for an airbrush with a MAC valve. It's a fairly expensive feature that does the same thing.

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And there are air valves that you can screw into the airhose just before the airbrush to regulate the air further. But I must admit I love the mac brush I bought, a Master brand Iwata knockoff I bought from Airbrushdepot.com. It's nowhere near the quality of an Iwata, but it does the job, for less than half the price. They sell Iwatas, too, and other brands, and lots of accessories.

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Well, here's an unsolicited recommendation about airbrushes. I've used Paasche, Badger and Iwata. Right now, I use an Iwata HP-B+ with a .2mm tip and a Revolution B with a .3mm tip. If I had to pick just one airbrush for painting crankbaits, it would be the Revolution. Why? The inexpensive Revolution has exactly the same flawless build quality and excellent control as the HP. Its .3mm tip almost never clogs and I can use it for everything from color basecoating to decently fine detail work. Dump the paint in the top and shoot it. No worries about thinning or shooting thicker pearlized paint. Not as fine a spray pattern as the HP, but fine enough for 99% of crankbait painting work. The Revolution B is just "right sized" for painting crankbaits as a hobby. Not fussy, high quality construction, easy to clean, and the B cup holds the right amount of paint. IMO, it's a steal at around $70. Airbrush prices go up as the tip sizes go down. It's not about the quality of construction, which tends to remain more or less constant through each manufacturer's models.

Edited by BobP

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Appreciate the info but I should have informed yall of the shop compressor which is a 150psi tank which will regulate down to 30psi for sure because I checked. Im curious of what the moisture trap prevents or maybe allows does it promote a more consistant spray.

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Moisture trap does what the name implies and doesn't impact the spraying, other than removes the moisture from the air'

Some regulators have an addition outlet (threaded hole with plug)that is the tank pressure. If your regulator does have an additional outlet, that is where you can attach another regulator and trap. You would set this regulator to the upper limit of what would be used while airbrushing maybe a little higher if you have a long hose. If your regulator doesn't have an additional outlet you will have to place T fitting in the line running from the tank to the existing regulator. If you want a dedicated line to provide pressure for the airbrush.Which operates independently from the existing regulator

Edited by KcDano

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I use a 150 psi commercial 6 gal nail gun compressor. I put a moisture trap with a regulator on it. The moisture trap will catch any water that is in the air supply to the air gun and on older tanks it will catch and small rust partials.

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I don't paint, but I some knowledge of air compressor maintenance. If you add oil or live in an area with high humidity, a moisture trap is a must. I have seen that oil mist right after oiling the piston/cylinder and would think a moisture trap would prevent the oil from contaminating your paint.

KC, can you confirm that as fact or fiction? Thanks Dano.

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Yes, if it operates in high humidity a trap will stop the water and some of the oil. Coalescing filter will catch the oil.

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Joshua, water vapor under high pressure in your compressor tank condenses into water as it is released into lower pressure inside your airbrush hose, then is pushed through the airbrush and onto your crankbait, splattering the surface. The same principle applies to oil if you use a compressor that has to be oiled. So the ideal setup is to have an oil filter (if needed) and a moisture trap connected to the compressor. They are inexpensive and sold at most home centers that carry compressors and air tools.

You also want a regulator to control air pressure. Maybe your compressor already has one. You only really need one regulator somewhere in the system so you can run your airbrush at between 30-50 psi. But the finer control you have over air pressure, the better you can control the airbrush spray pattern. Finer lines and shading work best at lower pressure. That's why a MAC valve on an airbrush is handy. Compact in-line regulators that attach between the airbrush and its air hose are also available, as are pressure regulators that attach to the compressor outlet and have a twist knob and a psi gauge. It's about control + convenience + cost. Airbrushes with MAC valves are the most expensive option but perhaps the handiest. An in-line regulator is also handy but may be a little unwieldy connected to the airbrush. The regulator on the compressor is the cheapest but is not handy if you are running a big compressor over in the corner, 6 ft away from your airbrush. All of them work. You need at least one of them. You can mix and match them as you choose for convenience.

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