finlander

wood type and sizes for turning?

13 posts in this topic

Haven't posted here in awhile but I just aquired an ancient Shopsmith and am eager to turn a few baits. Is cedar too frail? Should I start with a thick piece, like 2 inches for safety? I have cedar pieces ripped down to like 1 " square now but am not sure if it is safe to use those. Other wood choices? Prolly going to make jerk/pull baits from turned stock. Thanks.

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Finlander,

I turn cedar baits all the time down to 1". I use both Western Red Cedar and Eastern White Cedar. I just make sure there is no splits or bad knots. I have never had a problem and have made many, many baits this way.

Rod

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But I would be STARTING with 1" square stock. Would I need to keep the speed down? I took this Shopsmith cause it had the lathe capability. It has been years since I have used one. Just looked over your pictures. When do you find time for the rest of your life, and shovel snow?? There are alot of lures there....:worship:

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Finlander,

I still don't think you would have a problem as long as the wood was not split or any big knots. I keep mine the same speed all the time. The key to the whole deal with a lathe is keep your tools real sharp and you will feel like your cutting butter. However, I have a midi-lathe that I bought just for lure making and it is much smaller than a shopsmith.....

Rod

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ceadars good to turn. make sure its knot free. turn at high speeds with sharp tooling. use a good dust collecter. we sand blanks in the lathe turning. . sandpaper is 150 grit, this does not raise grains. sealer and primer adheres well this way. enjoy and wear glasses, be safe

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Hi,

Would you guys please post where you get your Cedar, I would like to buy some eastern red cedar but I am not having much luck searching on the web.

Thanks

Dan

PS

I would like to have some blocks 7/8" X 7/8" and 1"X1" to turn on my mini lathe. I have a table saw and can rip some boards down if I can find them.

Edited by DanCampbell
More info

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I've turned 1x1 blanks of various cedars with no problems. Like the other guys said, sharp tools, no knots, spin them fast. The only time it might be a problem is if you were turning very long, thin blanks.

Andrew

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i believe its eastern white cedar.

western red cedar.

try a local lumber yard.

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I turn cedar all the time. Start with 1x1 blanks and turn down just below 3/4" round, never had a problem yet. I also make wooden ink pens, turn those down to 3/8" round, will sometimes get a blow out on that, but nothing dangerous, just pi$$es me off cause it waits until I'm almost done.

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Do you play Jimmy when you turn???:sauced: It is 24 years old, the Shopsmith. I have made pens too. I can turn them on the lathe or vertically on the drill press. Havent done that for a few years either. Those are made from a harder wood. I will go gently and try a few this week. I'll have to try a 'specialty' store for more wood choices. I just have this red cedar sitting that I had ripped awhile back. Thanks for all the replies.

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I use Cedar exclusively for my topwater musky baits. You shouldnt have any problems if you follow the suggestions others have offered.

To get reasonably priced cedar you can buy 2"x2"x8' (actually 1 5/8"x 1 5/8")at most lumber yards for around $4-$5 a piece. You may have to pick through them to get the ones without knots or splits, but they work well. Another option is to get 4"x4"(3 5/8"x 3 5/8") x 8'. For those I either rip down on the table saw to get whatever sizes I am looking for, or just turn down if I'm not looking to go much smaller diameter.

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